#1
I've never used one of these but it just occurred to me, how the hell do these things work? I know it's supposed to "tune" your guitar up however many half steps, but I don't see how it does that. Wouldn't putting one on barre the entire guitar at that fret? So then how can you play with the lower frets?

I realize I probably sound like a retard right now, but I want to find out.
#2
you aren't able to play the frets behind the capo, that's one of the disadvantages
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#3
Yes it does barre one whole fret unless you get a special one like Andy Mckee has that only barres certain strings. But most will just barre all strings on one fret and you can't play lower, but that's the point of the capo - to play higher not lower.
#4
You don't play the lower frets. It's a quick way to up-tune the guitar.
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#6
yeah... *cough* this is gunna be kinda awkward for you, you cant. it does barre the fret. u cant play above it, and even if u tuned up manually, u still couldnt play notes lower than the guitars tuning.


edit: no, u simply only put the capo on when a fret above 5 is played, meaning it makes no difference.

the capo is simple. it covers everything within the parameters u set it too. its kind of like, oh i dont know. the searchbar.
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Last edited by bananahammock at Jan 1, 2010,
#7
Quote by guitarhero_764
Oh, so in this tab for instance:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/p/porcupine_tree/trains_tab.htm

Where it says capo fifth fret, do I just treat the 0's as the fifth fret and play down there?

You treat the capo like the nut and play like you normally would. So open strings would actually be the 5th fret.
You can always play without one and actually barre with your index but it takes real strength from the other fingers, and good thing about that is you can go to the low notes if you want (some songs require a capo though because you use all 4 fingers with the capo, which means without it you would need 5 fingers).
#8
Quote by tenfold
You treat the capo like the nut and play like you normally would. So open strings would actually be the 5th fret.
You can always play without one and actually barre with your index but it takes real strength from the other fingers, and good thing about that is you can go to the low notes if you want (some songs require a capo though because you use all 4 fingers with the capo, which means without it you would need 5 fingers).

Alright thanks.

I can't even barre 6 strings my finger doesn't go that straight for some reason so I would need a capo.
#9
Quote by guitarhero_764
Alright thanks.

I can't even barre 6 strings my finger doesn't go that straight for some reason so I would need a capo.

That is odd, I'm gonna assume you just need to practice barring more. You'll still need to learn how to barre, capos can't act as an alternative all the time.
#10
I can do barre chords, but the strings I usually have my other three fingers on will sound muted if I take them off.

I just wanted a capo so I could play that song
#11
You'll build more strength and soon you should be able to barre all of the strings. Just a tip if you don't know yet, you should put most of the force into the middle of your finger, as opposed to both the ends. Enjoy your capo though.
#12
One reason songwriters use capos is so they can easily change the song into a key that fits their voice as not everybody has the same range.
#13
As Disaronno says... Let's say you've learned a song in "G", and someone wants to sing it in B-flat. Instead of re-learning the tune in such an awkward key, just capo "up" 3-frets...

A lot of Bluegrass music is based in keys like "G" where you can do all the standard licks and runs on open strings. However, not everyone sings in "G".... (I don't!)

There are clever capos like the "third hand" that allows you to select individual strings. Instant "open" tunings are possible.
#14
Quote by tenfold
You treat the capo like the nut and play like you normally would. So open strings would actually be the 5th fret.
You can always play without one and actually barre with your index but it takes real strength from the other fingers, and good thing about that is you can go to the low notes if you want (some songs require a capo though because you use all 4 fingers with the capo, which means without it you would need 5 fingers).



So if open strings are the 5th fret then 1 on the tab would be the 6th fret and so on right?
#15
Quote by stevve
So if open strings are the 5th fret then 1 on the tab would be the 6th fret and so on right?


That's correct.................
#16
Quote by stevve
So if open strings are the 5th fret then 1 on the tab would be the 6th fret and so on right?

Yes. You just have to convince yourself that the capo is the nut, and forget about position markers because those will usually mess you up.