#1
Okay, so I don't know where this fits in quite, so feel free to move it if I'm wrong. Anyway, I've been playing for a little more than a year now, and I was quite ignorant at the start of my playing. I wasn't very theory inclined, and now that I see completely how important it is, I feel that I must learn it. However, my budget is limited, I live in the middle of nowhere, with the nearest teacher 1 hr away, and, as I said, my budget is low. My question's basically are:

1) Where do I start? I know my pentatonic scales and that's it.

2) What are some free online resources I can use to learn (besides UG) or cheap books I should buy to get started on this?

Thanks in advance, I'm sorry if this is in the wrong spot/has been posted before. I couldn't find much of anything with the search.
#2
1) Where do I start? I know my pentatonic scales and that's it.
Know your Major scale, the most important chords (I, ii, IV, V), how they relate to the major scale and how they are made. This especially includes intervals.
It is regrettable that you learnt the pentatonic before the Major scale..

Learning to read sheet music I think will be the most important skill as well, as a lot of theory uses names that refer to sheet music rather than an insturment (other than piano)

2) What are some free online resources I can use to learn (besides UG) or cheap books I should buy to get started on this?

Theory for the contempory guitarist - Capuzzo

there are heaps of resources online, just google it.
Last edited by mdwallin at Jan 2, 2010,
#3
Yeah, I forgot. I DO also know my major scale, that's the W W H W W W H right? Thanks for the book suggestion, I'm going to look it up right now.
#4
Quote by Duality Ninja
Yeah, I forgot. I DO also know my major scale, that's the W W H W W W H right? Thanks for the book suggestion, I'm going to look it up right now.

yup, it is.

can you read sheet music? I think that may be the next step for you, then chord assembly.

Once you get that, you know how to solo w/ scales or knowledge of the key. You can find the key of a song if you need to, you can make your own chord progressions and melodies without having to use too much trial and error.
#6
The core of theory is this, in order:

Intervals
Chord Construction
Diatonic Theory
Application

Learned it this order you understand note relationships in common theory language (Intervals, basic scales, basic chord fundamentals), then you learn common ways they are stacked to harmonies (dyads, traids, extended chords, etc...), then you learn how all of this is all found in the Major scale and how it is used to note only relate notes together but also how chords can be related to each other in a Key (Diatonic Theory).

Learned in any other order will just make it inevitable that you'll need to go back and start at the beginning, IOW like you're chasing your tail. So learn them in that order

Use this: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/ and read these lessons, in this order:


Intervals
Chord Construction
Diatonic Theory/Modes

In that order you'll see one lesson picks up where the last one left off. Read them 3 times before moving to the next one. There's a lot of material there and if you skim over it you'll be right back here asking the same questions again and again, so if you're going to take the time to learn it...take your time!

That will get you pretty far in theory and show you the lingo and understanding to be able to talk theory with many 'in the know'. Since Theory is a communication tools, you'll be able to communicate better, and you might be able to communicate with music better too.

Once you're done with them, put it to the test and start looking at the other concepts on the page and see how it all ties together in application and further concepts, and music.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Jan 2, 2010,
#7
Quote by Duality Ninja
Okay, so I don't know where this fits in quite, so feel free to move it if I'm wrong. Anyway, I've been playing for a little more than a year now, and I was quite ignorant at the start of my playing. I wasn't very theory inclined, and now that I see completely how important it is, I feel that I must learn it. However, my budget is limited, I live in the middle of nowhere, with the nearest teacher 1 hr away, and, as I said, my budget is low. My question's basically are:

1) Where do I start? I know my pentatonic scales and that's it.

2) What are some free online resources I can use to learn (besides UG) or cheap books I should buy to get started on this?

Thanks in advance, I'm sorry if this is in the wrong spot/has been posted before. I couldn't find much of anything with the search.


For free, I'd suggest Mike Dodge. Hes done a good a job as any I've seen.

For applying things to the guitar, I'd suggest starting with Notes on the Neck, learn them, get them down solid.
#8
Quote by Sean0913
For free, I'd suggest Mike Dodge. Hes done a good a job as any I've seen.

For applying things to the guitar, I'd suggest starting with Notes on the Neck, learn them, get them down solid.


Thanks again Sean.

Part 1 of the Intervals tutorial covers learning the notes on the neck/fretboard. It explains simple Intervals (whole step and Half steps), the Cycle of Notes (the note name order and accidentals) and how it's applied to the fretboard to learn the note names of each of the frets. And it shows you relative ways of learning and memorizing them.

That's pretty much the start of it all. You don't need to memorize every note in a day but if you understand the simple process of how to find them, a good chunk of the notes are found very easily and the rest can be found relative to the easy ones.
#9
Quote by MikeDodge
Thanks again Sean.

Part 1 of the Intervals tutorial covers learning the notes on the neck/fretboard. It explains simple Intervals (whole step and Half steps), the Cycle of Notes (the note name order and accidentals) and how it's applied to the fretboard to learn the note names of each of the frets. And it shows you relative ways of learning and memorizing them.

That's pretty much the start of it all. You don't need to memorize every note in a day but if you understand the simple process of how to find them, a good chunk of the notes are found very easily and the rest can be found relative to the easy ones.


Mike, please check your in-box for a PM. I know you've taught for more years than I have, but I hope what I have to share will be of real value to you. It's clear that you are passionate about teaching as I am. Teaching, as anyone that knows me, is my life's calling. When I run my school and Im teaching others, Im doing what I was born into this world to be doing.

Best,

Sean
#11
Quote by Sean0913
Mike, please check your in-box for a PM. I know you've taught for more years than I have, but I hope what I have to share will be of real value to you. It's clear that you are passionate about teaching as I am. Teaching, as anyone that knows me, is my life's calling. When I run my school and Im teaching others, Im doing what I was born into this world to be doing.

Best,

Sean


I don't see anything in my in box yet Sean. But I'll keep my eyes open for it.

Yep, I have always loved teaching. Keep up the good work.
#13
Quote by Sean0913
Mike, it should be there, have you received it yet?


No, I don't have anything in the in box yet. Strange.
#14
Quote by MikeDodge
No, I don't have anything in the in box yet. Strange.



Double hit ya this time, wherever theres a message possible you got one waiting. Did you click the "My Profile" yellow box? For some reason the site has two places to PM someone, and most people use the My Profile. But this discussion forum page may read Private Messages 0 - under the login box....confusing.