#1
Hey Guys, I'm not sure what to do really. I have been playing guitar for about 5 - 6 years now, and as i started at an early age (and didnt really commit myself to a practice routine) have only really improved a great deal in the last 2 years, however im still not satisfied with my playing. Im a good player but im not really fast when it comes to 'shredding'. I'm not overly keen on the music that 'Shredders' such as Steve Vai etc. make but would love to be able to do it. I went to a guitar teacher before who was obviously very very good at this kind of stuff but the only problem was that he was well... mental. I mean he was actually scary! But anyhow im wondering what you guys think would improve my playing more, Teaching my self using lessons on this site, books, dvds etc. or Going to see the crazy bloke. Cheers
#2
Quote by Wild_Beast
Hey Guys, I'm not sure what to do really. I have been playing guitar for about 5 - 6 years now, and as i started at an early age (and didnt really commit myself to a practice routine) have only really improved a great deal in the last 2 years, however im still not satisfied with my playing. Im a good player but im not really fast when it comes to 'shredding'. I'm not overly keen on the music that 'Shredders' such as Steve Vai etc. make but would love to be able to do it. I went to a guitar teacher before who was obviously very very good at this kind of stuff but the only problem was that he was well... mental. I mean he was actually scary! But anyhow im wondering what you guys think would improve my playing more, Teaching my self using lessons on this site, books, dvds etc. or Going to see the crazy bloke. Cheers


Just because he is good, doesn't mean he can teach. I'm actually rudimentary compared to a lot of guitarists, even my own students, but I can teach it - its just that what you practice at that's what you'll perfect. I mean dont get me wrong I can play fast when needed, I just don't practice it, because of my student load, at the end of the day, the last thing I want to do is play more guitar. I'm more a singer songwriter now, and so I spend my personal music development more on the side of my vocals and songwriting.

Point is, being self taught can be hard, no one is there to tell you whether youre right or wrong. Find a good technique book, like maybe something by Troy Stetina, such as Speed Lead for the Guitar, and a metronome, and commit to self discipline, and youll be fine. If you need an online metronome there's one at metronome-online.com that several of the Academy Students use.

I hope this helps - stay away from the crazy guy.

Best,

Sean
#3
Quote by Wild_Beast
Hey Guys, I'm not sure what to do really. I have been playing guitar for about 5 - 6 years now, and as i started at an early age (and didnt really commit myself to a practice routine) have only really improved a great deal in the last 2 years, however im still not satisfied with my playing. Im a good player but im not really fast when it comes to 'shredding'. I'm not overly keen on the music that 'Shredders' such as Steve Vai etc. make but would love to be able to do it. I went to a guitar teacher before who was obviously very very good at this kind of stuff but the only problem was that he was well... mental. I mean he was actually scary! But anyhow im wondering what you guys think would improve my playing more, Teaching my self using lessons on this site, books, dvds etc. or Going to see the crazy bloke. Cheers


If you go to a teacher or an academy you have to be sure that he is a good teacher, not a good player

If you want to teach by yourself, you can check books and DVDs like "Rock Discipline" by John Petrucci, "Terrifying Guitar Trip" by Paul Gilbert or the Brett Garsed's DVD (I forgot the name)

P.S.: sorry for my bad english
#4
Quote by Sean0913
Just because he is good, doesn't mean he can teach. I'm actually rudimentary compared to a lot of guitarists, even my own students, but I can teach it - its just that what you practice at that's what you'll perfect. I mean dont get me wrong I can play fast when needed, I just don't practice it, because of my student load, at the end of the day, the last thing I want to do is play more guitar. I'm more a singer songwriter now, and so I spend my personal music development more on the side of my vocals and songwriting.

Point is, being self taught can be hard, no one is there to tell you whether youre right or wrong. Find a good technique book, like maybe something by Troy Stetina, such as Speed Lead for the Guitar, and a metronome, and commit to self discipline, and youll be fine. If you need an online metronome there's one at metronome-online.com that several of the Academy Students use.

I hope this helps - stay away from the crazy guy.

Best,

Sean


This.

I'm self taught as well. I've only been playing for like..... maybe a year and half? Something like that, I forget.

Anyway I can play like some technical thrash stuff now. I never took lessons, I almost NEVER even do online lessons.

I DO suggest taking lessons because then you can read sheet music and you'll understand scales and all that. I dont, I SHOULD take lessons just for those reasons alone but I dont wanna.

If I wanted to SHRED like a mother****er I would for sure. But I'm perfectly happy being a rhythm guitarist and doing an odd lead here and there.
Fire it up, let the engines roll!
It's time to burn it down!
Keep bleeding on till the day you die!
Forever love it loud, yeah!
#5
Quote by Bazookajoe_666
This.

you can read sheet music and you'll understand scales and all that. I dont, I SHOULD take lessons just for those reasons alone but I dont wanna.


When parents come to me asking should their child learn to sightread, I say no.

They should first fall in love with the guitar, learn to love it by doing all the things that make it fun and watch as they become more and more confident - then when their internal hunger to know more, surfaces, then they have an actual reason and personal desire to learn to sightread.

Thats when I apply David Oakes - Music Reading for the Guitar, and they are playing and reading charts within a couple of months - but they also knew all their scales, modes keys, notes on the neck and chords and theory before they ever reached the point where they said "Hey I wanna learn to read music now".

Point is, learn it when it's personally meaningful to YOU.

A byproduct of successful learning, is the unsatisfied constant hunger to learn more.
#6
I'd say you're better off trying to learn on your own. I'm not that much of a shredder myself but I'm working on it. I've only had 8 actual guitar lessons and most of those were for fingerstyle acoustic anyways
#7
I learned on my own for about 3 years now. I don't regret it, however I would love to take lessons to see what I could learn.
Agile AL3000
Douglas WRL90
SX SR1 STD Plus
J&D Strat
Squier Tele
Sammick TR2
Douglas Draco
Peavey JSX
Bugera V5
TWANGED VJ
#8
if you have the true desire to learn you will seek out a teacher.
it is true that our learning comes from within,and we need to apply ourselves to do this.but learning is like hairdressing.
you can be the best hairdresser in the world but you can only cut your own hair so well!
let a teacher play the role in your learning but don't expect them to play your role in learning,if you can distinguish the roles, then your answer will come !
#9
Well, I've always had private lessons and with my current teacher it almost killed my passion for guitar. He hardly turns up anyway and I just get loads of theory thrown at me. My playing, as in songs etc, has actually gotten worse even though my theory knowledge has improved... Plus, he's never put me in for a grade exam even though my old teacher a few years ago got me to Grade 3 in a couple of years... I should be Grade 5 at least by now but he just keeps putting off. So my dad's spent 20 quid a week for nothing, basically. It's gone on far too long, and though I'm glad I understand a canny bit of theory, I really want to stop the lessons for a while and rediscover my love for the guitar, learning songs again and stuff.
I would rather be flawed and wise, than perfect and blind.