#1
Recently I sat down to jam with a buddy and I just didn't feel great about my playing. Granted he's been playing on n off for 8+ years, and I've been playing about 4 months.
It didn't really put me down saying "wow, I suck" it was more of a "hey, you need to practice more". So I decided I want to try and do a solid schedule, keeping time and everything. No wandering off. Usually when I sit down, I run my warm up exercises and then look around for stuff to do. I want to have what I'm going to do set and ready so I don't even touch my computer. So far I can come up with this

1.) Warm up( stretches, picking etc etc 5-10)
2.)Scales/notes (run through scales, saying each note as I play it)
3.) Learn a song
4.) Practice what I know( just a refresher 5-10 min)
5.) Attempt at ear training? I find this uttterly impossible at this stage. I mean I try but idk. Any tips?
6.) Learn something new

Anyways that's what I can think of for now. Please suggest anything how to clean this up, or things I should def look at doing in there.
#2
Write your own music or improvise at least half of the time. Seriously, you're playing will take off if you create your own music. So I would say after you go through your scales, improvise using them.
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#3
just asking a question, i warm up for about 1 hour, i feel it wastes a lot of my time, for how long do you guys warm up for?
Join the Guitar Religion
#4
Quote by gatechballer
Write your own music or improvise at least half of the time. Seriously, you're playing will take off if you create your own music. So I would say after you go through your scales, improvise using them.


What this guy said; improvising is a great way to become familiar with the instrument (not to mention it's a lot of fun)

Also, playing songs with the track going in the background is a good way to learn to keep time and it really tightens up your playing.
#5
I've been doing some improvising on A minor pentatonic. Nothing crazy, but I got a cool solo kinda down. Thanks for the suggestions, keep em coming.
#6
Quote by igordubai
just asking a question, i warm up for about 1 hour, i feel it wastes a lot of my time, for how long do you guys warm up for?


you don't need to warm up for a whole hour. Anywhere between 5-30 minutes should do it. But it also depends on what you consider a warm up. Some people just do scales, some do chord progressions, some have lengthy finger exercises, some warm up by playing a song they can play perfectly already. So it really depends on the person. I spend about 10 minute going through scales and arpeggios, then like 5 on some chord progressions.
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#7
I know it's going to sound like new age BS, but I think one of the first things you have to do is come up with a list of goals for yourself, both long term and short term. Everyone playing guitar has different goals. Some people just want to play campfire songs, some people want to shred, some people are more interested in composing than guitar playing. So I think you should start out with your goals. Create some goals for 2010, like learning specific songs, learning a specific scale all over the fretboard, learning the notes of the fretboard, etc based on your current ability. Then create a plan that will get you there. Keep your list of goals nearby every time you practice to keep you focused.

There are some really good threads similar to this on UG that will help you create a practice schedule once you know what your focus is.

Like I said, could just be my new age BS, but I think practice schedules are highly customized to the individual guitar player.
#8
Quote by jsepguitar
I know it's going to sound like new age BS, but I think one of the first things you have to do is come up with a list of goals for yourself, both long term and short term. Everyone playing guitar has different goals. Some people just want to play campfire songs, some people want to shred, some people are more interested in composing than guitar playing. So I think you should start out with your goals. Create some goals for 2010, like learning specific songs, learning a specific scale all over the fretboard, learning the notes of the fretboard, etc based on your current ability. Then create a plan that will get you there. Keep your list of goals nearby every time you practice to keep you focused.

There are some really good threads similar to this on UG that will help you create a practice schedule once you know what your focus is.

Like I said, could just be my new age BS, but I think practice schedules are highly customized to the individual guitar player.



This is very TRENDY NEW AGE BS!!!......but, honestly......he's right. However cliche it sounds, this is the best way to go. If you're writing songs, give yourself a deadline. It really helps motivate you to stay on track.
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#9
well I'm def looking to make my own music. I picked up guitar to play songs I make, and create something on my own. Only thing I see in playing others songs is maybe learning a few things, grabbing a small block of notes to incorporate into your own licks.
#10
I don't think the goal setting stuff is new age BS at all. To me if you have goals, you are focusing your efforts, putting the energy where it will help achieve what is most important for your playing. Without goals, you are just kind of drifting around.
In order to have goals, you must first have observations which lead to the goals - such as observations about an area of your technique that is not good enough, or an observation about your improvising. This observing - paying attention to what you are doing, is key, I mean really key, to your development as a musician.
So, goals = good.

To the guy that asked about warm-up time. For me - 5 mins stretching, followed by 25 mins of warm up. I've tried 15 mins for warm-up, and it works, but I find that my playing definately feels better after the 25 minute version. I think an hour is definately overkill, and could be detrimental in that by the time you are done with the warm up, you could be starting to lose that initial burst of momentum and enthusiasm you have when you first pick up the guitar for the day.
#11
Quote by jmeyer1022
well I'm def looking to make my own music. I picked up guitar to play songs I make, and create something on my own. Only thing I see in playing others songs is maybe learning a few things, grabbing a small block of notes to incorporate into your own licks.


If your goal is to write songs you need to know a decent amount of theory. Of course there are accomplished guitarists that claim to not know any theory, they're exceptions rather then reality.

The truth is you don't need to know any songs to be able to write them but it definitely helps. You should atleast analyize songs if you're not going to learn any. Gives you new ideas to work with.

Also you've been only been playing 4 months. You can't really expect to be the person like I don't know, where everyone says "Damn, that guy can play guitar." I've been playing for 4 years and I'm nowhere's near where I want to be. All I can say is practice, consitantly.