#1
Whenever me and my dad or one of my friends jam it's usually one of us playing the rhythm and one of us playing leads.

Usually when we play we figure out the key of the solo by the first chord that's played. So if the first chord is E we play in the key or E if the first chord is A we play in the key of a, etc. It sounds fine and doesn't sound out of key But I still feel like that's the wrong way to do it.

Any help?
#2
Actually, many times, that IS the way you find the key of a song. Many bands will often start the song with the chord of the key name. However, the other way to do it is just figureing out what sharps they play. Sit there, let them play through it once or twice, figure out what sharps they have in the progression and use that to figure out the key.
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#3
Thats the correct way to do it. Beware though, occashionally a song does not start on the tonic and might start on the third instead. The best way to truly analyze the key of a song is to figure out the chords in a song, and see what key it is accordingly. But for simple rock and blues jams you will do just fine by the first chord of the song. Hope this helps!
#4
The proper way to do is to see what chords there are and choose your notes/scales based on those chords and what you expect would fit and what doesn't. And maybe add/subtract whatever notes you want as it isn't an 'exact science' when to comes to composing music.
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#5
A song will usually start on the first chord of that key, but just in case it doesn't you can look for two major chords only a tone apart and they will be the 4th and 5th (for a major key).

For example, if you have the chords: C G D G in a song, it's NOT in the key of C. What you have to do is find two major chords a tone apart and then count backwards. Here we have C and D a tone apart and so we can work backwards and say it's in G major.

Just learn the to harmonize the major scale:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Major, Minor, Minor, Major, Major, Minor, Diminished

(ok, posting this screwed up the numbers there, they're supposed to be over the words...)
Last edited by chainsawguitar at Jan 2, 2010,
#6
Quote by chainsawguitar
A song will usually start on the first chord of that key, but just in case it doesn't you can look for two major chords only a tone apart and they will be the 4th and 5th (for a major key).

For example, if you have the chords: C G D G in a song, it's NOT in the key of C. What you have to do is find two major chords a tone apart and then count backwards. Here we have C and D a tone apart and so we can work backwards and say it's in G major.

Just learn the to harmonize the major scale:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Major, Minor, Minor, Major, Major, Minor, Diminished

(ok, posting this screwed up the numbers there, they're supposed to be over the words...)


You mean like this:

  1     2     3      4     5      6       7
Major, Minor, Minor, Major, Major, Minor, Diminished

Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
Last edited by Simsimius at Jan 2, 2010,
#7
so if i played Em G D C what would the key signature be? what do you mean count backwards
#8
Quote by kaylband
so if i played Em G D C what would the key signature be? what do you mean count backwards

G Major.

By backwards he meant look for 2 chords a whole tone apart, then take the lower of the 2 and go down a fourth.
Like if you looked at a song and saw F and G, those would be the IV and V (4 and 5) of the key, and you would go down a fourth from the lower one (F) to find the key is C.
#10
Quote by chainsawguitar


For example, if you have the chords: C G D G in a song, it's NOT in the key of C. What you have to do is find two major chords a tone apart and then count backwards. Here we have C and D a tone apart and so we can work backwards and say it's in G major.



Well you can see it has 1 F#, in the D chord and the other chords don't have any sharps so if you know G major has 1 sharp you can figure it out in 3 seconds
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