#1
hi guys. i was wondering what the difference b/w a les paul studio and an LP standard.

Some say it's the pickups, some say it's the binding, some say the wood. but i want to know the main difference and whether or not it matters when playing?

If i get an Epiphone (Standard or studio), will it have the same differences as the Gibson ones have??
#2
studio is made to work, not to be fancy. less expense on the finish and less glitter on the machinery, basically... they're built for clear tone and good intonation more than extreme durability or showiness.
#4
The difference is pickups and aesthetics.
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#5
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
The difference is pickups and aesthetics.



NO

The Les Paul Studio is designed for a studio musician. This means that the guitar is targeted toward guitar players more concerned with tone and playability than cosmetics thus eliminating unnecessary expenses that go into a model designed for performances. For this reason, the elements of the Gibson Les Paul that contribute to tone and playability (a carved maple top and standard mechanical and electronic hardware) are retained, while elements that do not (binding on the body and neck as well as ornate inlays) are not.

Early models from the late 70's featured dot fret markers on top of ebony or rosewood fretboards, neck and body binding, and the introduction of a painted Gibson logo. In the mid 80's the dot markers were replaced by trapezoidal inlay. In the early 90's the option of an ebony fretboard was discontinued, but they are now available on the classic and alpine white finishes.

[edit] Electronics
The Les Paul Studio features the same electronics as the Custom model. This includes two pickups (one at the bridge position and another at the neck), a volume control unit for each pickup, a tone control unit for each pickup, and a three-way selector switch. A standard 1/4-inch guitar cable jack is located at the bottom rim of the instrument.

The pickups currently installed in this model are the Gibson 490R Alnico magnet humbucker in the neck position and the Gibson 498T Alnico magnet humbucker in the bridge position. The Studio Lite version of the Les Paul was equipped with ceramic magnet humbuckers (496R/500T).
#6
Quote by DavidBenyamin
NO


So basically, you told me that the difference between the Les Paul Studio and the Les Paul Standard, is a lack of binding, painted Gibson logo (aesthetics) and Modern Classic series pickups (The Standard has burstbuckers).

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My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


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#7
I think that not having a binding is the main reason why the studios are cheaper. I think the bindings are done by hand and are therefore expensive.
#8
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
So basically, you told me that the difference between the Les Paul Studio and the Les Paul Standard, is a lack of binding, painted Gibson logo (aesthetics) and Modern Classic series pickups (The Standard has burstbuckers).



Excuse me, it turns out I suck at english.
#9
Studios, Standards and Customs as well as some other LP archtop models are all basically the same. Most of the differences are in the cosmetics of the guitar most use the same pickups some might be weight relived or chambered depending on the guitar. I have played a lot of Studios that were just as good if not better than their more expensive counterparts. If you want a decent inexpensive Studio check out the Faded ones they are much cheaper because they lack the expensive Nitro finish and perform very well. Try several out there are decent and better ones in the line.

Studios usually come with the usual 490T and 490R set of pups.
New Standards are chambered with Burstbucks.
I think the LP Custom comes with 57 Classics
The Supreme which IMHO is the best LP available only has the 490R AND 498T pick ups.
I am sure there are exceptions with each guitar depending on what Gibson might have decided to do at a certain time. They are always adding special editions here and there that will be outside the norm.

As far as build quality and wood quality I do not think there is any difference at all.

John
#10
what genres are you interested in PFP? i have a faded studio which suits classic rock and blues tones perfect as it has burstbucker pro pups. the finished studios (wine and the white models etc) have the alnico 490T and 490R they are a little hotter and brighter. also the faded is all mahogony and the finished studios are a maple cap.
#11
Tokai Love Rock is better than the Studio anyway.
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#12
what genres are you interested in PFP? i have a faded studio which suits classic rock and blues tones perfect as it has burstbucker pro pups. the finished studios (wine and the white models etc) have the alnico 490T and 490R they are a little hotter and brighter. also the faded is all mahogony and the finished studios are a maple cap.


i'm interested in the Les Paul because of my interest in playing the blues. problem is i can probably afford an epiphone more easily than a gibson. what i want to know is that do these same differences exist in epiphone versions.??
#13
A Gibson Les Paul Studio is made of the lower grade cuts of wood that are considered either not resonant enough, too heavy or simply not pretty enough to be used in a Standard model. A common beliefe is that these cuts of wood aren't treated as well as the wood used in Standards either, but without watching every piece of wood like a hawk it's not possible to actually tell this really. Either way, the end result is that the wood in the body, neck and fretboard of Studios is lower quality than that used in Standards. Wood grade is slightly subjective though so it is possible for the occasional Studio to turn up with wood effectively the same quality as that in a Standard or for a Standard to be made with sub-par wood, but on average the Standard will have better body, neck and fretboard woods. Ironically, because of this, a Studio is a much worse choice to record with while in a live setting where the foibles of the Studio's wood won't be so obvious it may be more preferable to use the cheaper Studio model instead. Because of this I prefer to think of the Studio as a rough-and-ready gigging guitar than a ''studio'' instrument.

Beyond that, there are of course the finish and pickup differences as many people have already pointed out.

Some people - myself included - will argue that they seem to not take so much care over the core construction of Studio/Vintage Mahogany/Faded models, or perhaps they don't spend quite so long going through quality control. Either way, in my experience it's easier to find a poorly finished and poorly constructed Studio than it is to find a poorly constructed Standard. Then again there are plenty of Studios around that have no apparent construction or finishing flaws. I think when shopping for a Studio you just need to double-check everything, pay just a little more attention to it.


If you're looking at Gibsons, I really think it's worth the extra money to buy a Standard, Classic, Traditional or so on instead of a Studio, especially if you are actually recording.



In the case of Epiphones, it's not such a huge difference. Epi LP Studios come with no binding, dot fretboard markers and uncovered pickups (based on the design of the Gibson '57 Classic pickups - the same as the Standard has, just the ones ont he Standard have covers). It also seems Epi Studios may get the less attractive cuts of wood than the Standards which have transparent finished (part of the reason the Standards that don't have solid finishes tend to cost quite a lot more than the solid-finished Standards). So in the case of the Epiphone models, the differences are much more just aesthetic. To be on the safe side I'd still advise you (or anyone else looking at the Epi models) to buy a Standard if you have the money for it, but there's no real shame in having an Epi Studio.
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#15
Ever heard of a Spec Sheet...?
(Read Next Post)

So basically, looks or tones.
***Save money > Better Tones***
(we have a winner)
Spend Money > Better Looks

Lol..
Last edited by [EricS] at Jan 4, 2010,
#16
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Features:

* Mahogany body
* Maple veneer over carved top
* Alnico Classic humbuckers
* Chrome hardware
* Grover tuners
* 24-3/4" scale
* 1-11/16" nut width
* Set mahogany neck
* Slim-tapered neck profile
* Rosewood fretboard with trapezoid inlays
* Body/neck binding
* LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge/stopbar tailpiece

Epiphone Les Paul Studio Electric Guitar Features:

* Set mahogany neck
* Rosewood fingerboard
* Mahogany body with carved top
* Hot open-coil Alnico Classic humbuckers
* Dot fingerboard inlays
* LockTone Tune-O-Matic bridge and LockTone stopbar tailpiece
#17
[quote="'[EricS"]']Ever heard of a Spec Sheet...?
(Read Next Post)

So basically, looks or tones.
***Save money > Better Tones***
(we have a winner)
Spend Money > Better Looks

Lol..

i don't get your sign language. please write in complete english. thank you.
#19
These threads come up at least once a month. I promise you that any information you could possibly want can be acquired by using the search bar on these forums or by using google. It would only take a few minutes, and would be much faster than waiting on us to give people the same answers again. If there is anything that you CAN'T find that way, however, ask a specific question and I or someone else who owns a Les Paul or knows about their construction can help you.
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Beat the recession by soldering your strings back together! What's more, the extra metal vibrating back and forth will add to your tone... and what could be more metal than more metal!?!

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Plz uz reel wurdz bcoz wen u tipe lik this its hard 2 red.