#1
Well, I have been playing for two years and taking lessons for two years. At the moment, my skills are limited to pentatonics, and major scales, and Im just starting to grasp this whole "tonal centers" or modes as most of you call them. I can play my pentatonics at a decently fast speed, I have my tasty licks, I know the idea of tapping. What I want to work on, is Sweep Picking. Basically, I want some arpreggios to practise, like starting with 3-string and work up. Any ideas?
#3
the only advice I can give you is to practise it really SLOOOOOWLY in the beginning. dont expect any improvement too fast.
#4
http://www.vimeo.com/8148725

If you know theory you can find your own sweeps on the neck, just think of a chord then find the notes in the order of the chord on the neck in a position that's close together.
#5
I'm not going to take the time to tab this out in this little text box. Why? If you're going to learn arpeggios you should be able to piece together triad chords and at least be <i>able<i> to find the notes on the fret board in many different positions.

Anyways, start with a personal favourite of mine of a Dm sweep arpeggio. I usually start out on the A on the 1st string. So go A,F,D and ascend back. Then after you have this cleanly add on up to the 4th string and end on F on your 4th string. Ascend back up. Got this down? Add on the D on the 5th string. And then you can screw around a bit. With this knowledge of how to do this and just playing around will open up more doors to you than just sweeping itself.

Understand?

And the reason I didn't give you any specific shapes is because I want you to think. What is an arpeggio and what notes are really making up what I play? How versatile can I be?
#6
Quote by Christian Davis
I'm not going to take the time to tab this out in this little text box. Why? If you're going to learn arpeggios you should be able to piece together triad chords and at least be <i>able<i> to find the notes on the fret board in many different positions.

Anyways, start with a personal favourite of mine of a Dm sweep arpeggio. I usually start out on the A on the 1st string. So go A,F,D and ascend back. Then after you have this cleanly add on up to the 4th string and end on F on your 4th string. Ascend back up. Got this down? Add on the D on the 5th string. And then you can screw around a bit. With this knowledge of how to do this and just playing around will open up more doors to you than just sweeping itself.

Understand?

And the reason I didn't give you any specific shapes is because I want you to think. What is an arpeggio and what notes are really making up what I play? How versatile can I be?



Sorry but... nice alliteration
#7
Quote by Christian Davis
I'm not going to take the time to tab this out in this little text box. Why? If you're going to learn arpeggios you should be able to piece together triad chords and at least be <i>able<i> to find the notes on the fret board in many different positions.

Anyways, start with a personal favourite of mine of a Dm sweep arpeggio. I usually start out on the A on the 1st string. So go A,F,D and ascend back. Then after you have this cleanly add on up to the 4th string and end on F on your 4th string. Ascend back up. Got this down? Add on the D on the 5th string. And then you can screw around a bit. With this knowledge of how to do this and just playing around will open up more doors to you than just sweeping itself.

Understand?

And the reason I didn't give you any specific shapes is because I want you to think. What is an arpeggio and what notes are really making up what I play? How versatile can I be?

yea, thanks, i can figure out my own apreggios, i meant to say excersises lol, but these are good tips
#8
Quote by jacobguitar123
Well, I have been playing for two years and taking lessons for two years. At the moment, my skills are limited to pentatonics, and major scales, and Im just starting to grasp this whole "tonal centers" or modes as most of you call them. I can play my pentatonics at a decently fast speed, I have my tasty licks, I know the idea of tapping. What I want to work on, is Sweep Picking. Basically, I want some arpreggios to practise, like starting with 3-string and work up. Any ideas?


well sweeping is basically or is economy picking but to avoid a mess just learn basics

there are basic patterns when it comes to sweeping and im talking about your right hand =O well im not sure if i can post up a example i will try so here it is

http://i626.photobucket.com/albums/tt347/Phrygian12/Swe-eeep-page1.jpg

its a 5 string arpeggio but i broke them up to 3 shapes to practice.
when attacking them in down and up stoke motion it should feel like one motion
rather then a series of separated down's and up's.

a note to point out is on the last triad you notice that the starting note is attacked with a down but when repeating it should be a up stroke completely(thats probably confusing but i think you'll understand what im talking about)

also its good to start out by practicing them in eighth notes and then work up to sixteenths

let me know if that was of any help to you at all.
#9
Quote by jacobguitar123
yea, thanks, i can figure out my own apreggios, i meant to say excersises lol, but these are good tips



If you want exercises, try learning the song "Neoclassical Sweeps", you can take multiple parts of that as an exercise.

I may be wrong, but i think the whole intro is just 3 string sweeps.
#10
I subscribed to Guitar Player magazine for about 10 years from the late 70s to the late 80s.

I had never heard of anyone using the term "sweep picking" in any way until recently. Seems to me from the descriptions that it's just a fairly standard method of playing arpeggios using combinations of strokes.
Not dissimilar to what would be called "cross-picking" in bluegrass...
#12
Quote by Bikewer
I subscribed to Guitar Player magazine for about 10 years from the late 70s to the late 80s.

I had never heard of anyone using the term "sweep picking" in any way until recently. Seems to me from the descriptions that it's just a fairly standard method of playing arpeggios using combinations of strokes.
Not dissimilar to what would be called "cross-picking" in bluegrass...


Wouldn't call the two techniques similar really. Sweeping picking is just playing arpeggios with the right hand doing one sweep down and up again hitting each string once (well, once again with the upstroke) and any other notes on a string filled in with legato. With sweep picking you're never going to have any notes ringing into the next either. The emphasis is on really good muting to make sure that its just a smooth, fast run through single notes to make sure you hear one at a time.