#1
what would you call this??

for all those music buffs...

D|--2--------2---------------------|
A|--2--------2---------------------|
E|--1--------3---------------------|


i know its a chord, i dont know if 'theoretically' it exists, but im wondering what you would call it if you had to write it down on a score.sometimes when you come across a riff or a lick, they have the weird chords above to tell you what key its in, and i just wanna know if this is anything (chord name), and if it is, be kind and explain? thanks
#3
I'd call it E5/F and E5/G, but I'm sure people who know more than me will know more complicated names.
#4
^Without context these are what you would probably call them.


First one could be Fmaj7#11 without the 3rd and 5th, as a #11 is more common in a chord with major tonality(rather than calling it [b5]). It could be other things, without context its hard to say.

Second one is more than likely Em/G.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Jan 3, 2010,
#5
first is Fmaj7b5 and second is G6. this is of course assuming the bass notes are the roots, otherwise they could be inversions of simpler chords.
#6
The second one could just be an inverted Em really.
I know now what I knew then, but I didn't know then what I know now
#7
The first one doesn't have a third so it could be Eaddb9/F or E-addb9/F depending on what you pick for the third. Or it could be FM7(b5) if you add an A or F-Major7(5b) if you add an Ab.

The second one is G6 or E-/G. Both of these are common.
#8
wow i didnt expect to get some help...so thank you
its a little hard to catch, but i think i understand most of it.

so im guessing the first one is called Fmaj because the root is of that chord is F, and the 7 means its the 7th note of that scale...right?
#9
Quote by killer puppy

so im guessing the first one is called Fmaj because the root is of that chord is F, and the 7 means its the 7th note of that scale...right?


Not exactly. For example both minor 7th and dominant 7th have flattened sevenths but you're on the right track.
Last edited by d1sturbed4eva at Jan 3, 2010,
#10
the first one isn't too uncommon in classical music in linear harmony. It's clearly function as an extremely diminished chord. It has a root, a diminished 5th, and a major 7th. You'll be hard pressed to find a name for it in pop music, although if you really wanted to, yes, you could call it an Fmaj7#11, but without a 3rd I'd find this one hard to believe since you virtually never drop a 3rd in jazz harmony (which is virtually the only place an Fmaj7#11 would really occur.)


My guess is, you wouldn't call it anything, and it'd function like a diminished chord based on F. You could move any of the 3 notes chromatically or diatonically up or down to form another chord, and it would simply be known as the chord that preceded it.


But that's my 2 cents. that's the beauty of theory.
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#11
Quote by UtBDan
the first one isn't too uncommon in classical music in linear harmony. It's clearly function as an extremely diminished chord. It has a root, a diminished 5th, and a major 7th. You'll be hard pressed to find a name for it in pop music, although if you really wanted to, yes, you could call it an Fmaj7#11, but without a 3rd I'd find this one hard to believe since you virtually never drop a 3rd in jazz harmony (which is virtually the only place an Fmaj7#11 would really occur.)


My guess is, you wouldn't call it anything, and it'd function like a diminished chord based on F. You could move any of the 3 notes chromatically or diatonically up or down to form another chord, and it would simply be known as the chord that preceded it.


But that's my 2 cents. that's the beauty of theory.


woww...i should read more...another quick question, what does 11 stand for?
#12
Quote by UtBDan
since you virtually never drop a 3rd in jazz harmony (which is virtually the only place an Fmaj7#11 would really occur.)



Actually it's not uncommon to drop the third in jazz, opposed to general belief.

The 2nd chord is clearly a first inversion E minor chord.