#1
why can some people pick up sweeps so easily and others cant? i know people who have been playing guitar for over 20 years and havent even come close yet there are people who can pick it up in a few years. can someone explain this?

EDIT: i know peoplewho went to music college and they know all about theory so dont give me that bull ****
Last edited by Riffofthebeast at Jan 4, 2010,
#2
Some people are just naturally geared for guitar. and also their technical skill level accounts for most of it.
Just because someone plays for 20 years doesn't mean they have good technique, but nowadays with all the information available, anyone can pretty easily get good technique.
#3
I learned how to about 6 months ago... and at that time I had only been playing for about 1 1/2 years. But I'm not a very good guitarist, it's just that I can sweep =S
Some people at school think I'm kinda good just cuz they've seen me sweep but like... they don't know shizzat haha xD
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#4
some people dont need to learn sweep picling for the kind of music they play so they dont really focus on it and osle whether they anchor their hand is important
#5
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Because some people practice slowly first, and develop a good technique.

Others refuse to learn theory and claim they play with real feeling like Hendrix and SRV.



How dare you diss Hendrix and Stevie!!!! And just because someone doesn't learn theory doesn't mean they have bad technique. Hendrix and SRV both played with all the most complex theory (jazz and blues based), but they just didn't know what it's all called. They used arpeggios, diminished 7th chords, blues notes, inverted chords, modes, key changes, etc. They just did it all by ear, rather than by learning it in a textbook manner.
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#6
Were you assigned the task of defending dead musicians? I don't think he dissed them, just the people who claim to play with feeling as he said; the people who think theory will hurt their creativity.
#7
Quote by gatechballer
How dare you diss Hendrix and Stevie!!!! And just because someone doesn't learn theory doesn't mean they have bad technique. Hendrix and SRV both played with all the most complex theory (jazz and blues based), but they just didn't know what it's all called. They used arpeggios, diminished 7th chords, blues notes, inverted chords, modes, key changes, etc. They just did it all by ear, rather than by learning it in a textbook manner.


People like you make me laugh.

It was directed not at SRV and Jimmi but at people who site them as examples of why you don't need either theory or technique other than "what is most compfortable for you".
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#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr

It was directed not at SRV and Jimmi but at people who site them as examples of why you don't need either theory or technique other than "what is most compfortable for you".



theory is very important, yes. technique? not so much... unless you're going for all speed, then yes "good" technique is important. but thankfully there's enough guitarists that don't see much value in that kind of playing and are plenty happy enough with expressing themselves through playing however they feel is best for their kind of music/style.

theory is quite important though.
#9
I think 'good technique' is evident when a player has great tone/phrasing/control/consistency in their playing.

Playing very fast or playing arpeggios with economy picking technique doesn't necessarily translate to 'good technique' - just a grasp of that technique.

I see a lot of people focusing on the specific mechanics of a technique a little too much, at the expense of other elements. So you get some guys on Youtube playing sweep arpeggio's at impressive speeds, but when you clock it to a metronome, its not really in time, it doesn't groove, they have no vibrato to speak of, and the tone is shrill/thin. When they slow down, their playing sounds much worse in fact.

Any who, point is - if you really focus on a technique like economy/sweep picking, you could get it down pretty quickly. Spend 3 months doing it 2 hours a day, and you'll have it down for sure. Many people have been playing for 20 years, but never worked on 1 mechanical excersise for 2 hours a day over 3 months Thats just the beginning though - to really control and incorporate it into a professional level improvisational/performance style would take a lot more work.

Having a grasp of theory and training your ears can only be of benefit to any aspiring guitarist / musician
#10
Quote by tenfold
Some people are just naturally geared for guitar. and also their technical skill level accounts for most of it.
Just because someone plays for 20 years doesn't mean they have good technique, but nowadays with all the information available, anyone can pretty easily get good technique.


This.
#11
How fast someone learns a certain technique depends on 1 thing mostly: How much time is put into the technique. Those guys that have played for 20 years and can't sweep, that's because they haven't practiced it as much as other people. I'm another example. I've been playing for around 12 years or so and I can sweep, but I'm not the best at it. If I want to learn a sweep section of a song I can probably do it, but it's just not my picking technique of choice. I'm more primarily an alternate picker.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#12
Quote by Junior#1
How fast someone learns a certain technique depends on 1 thing mostly: How much time is put into the technique.

Not really. Maybe to a small extent but it's really the quality of the practice.
Someone could practice 6 hours a day sweep picking and not be focused, like playing it while watching tv, and not learn it for years.
On the other hand, someone could spend 30 minutes a day on it being extremely focused and practicing correctly and be quite good at it in like 2 months.
#13
Quote by tenfold
Not really. Maybe to a small extent but it's really the quality of the practice.
Someone could practice 6 hours a day sweep picking and not be focused, like playing it while watching tv, and not learn it for years.
On the other hand, someone could spend 30 minutes a day on it being extremely focused and practicing correctly and be quite good at it in like 2 months.

Yeah that's true. So I guess to sum it all up: The more time you spent practicing properly, the faster you will get it.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#14
Frankly sweep picking isn't applicable to that many styles of music. I can sweep well enough if I really need to, but I probably have a use for it about twice a year. It's one of those things that bedroom shredders get all excited about that isn't really all that important in the real world.
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#15
It's great for chord arpeggios in jazz, only ascending or descending though. otherwise, I agree.
#16
Quote by hippieboy444
It's great for chord arpeggios in jazz, only ascending or descending though. otherwise, I agree.


The issue there is that it's very hard (or maybe I just find it hard?) to sweep with a swing feel. Sweeps seem to want to always be straight rhythms.
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The Illegal Les Paul
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“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
#17
It has to do with the cordination of the person aswell as the effectiveness of the practice they do. Its best just to start slow and work the speed up after you get it accurately. Accuracy b4 speed!
#20
Quote by Even Bigger D
The issue there is that it's very hard (or maybe I just find it hard?) to sweep with a swing feel. Sweeps seem to want to always be straight rhythms.


Well, I meant more in a modern tune. If you do it fast enough, the increment that makes swing feel distinct that it could be done, maybe.
#21
Quote by Even Bigger D
Frankly sweep picking isn't applicable to that many styles of music. I can sweep well enough if I really need to, but I probably have a use for it about twice a year. It's one of those things that bedroom shredders get all excited about that isn't really all that important in the real world.


Any technique is applicable to any style of music, all you need to do is find a set of notes that it's easiest to play it with.
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