#1
I don't think this belongs in the tone sticky because this is far beyond the realm of tone, and I genuinely think that this is open for interpretation and discussion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3w9HISAagoM

That's the song. The main thing I'm interested in is the octave/doubler effect that Bellamy is getting. Best I can get at it is that he might be using some type of amp switcher with three amps. One of which is put at the normal range, one of which is octaved down, the other of which is octaved up.

But I don't know about that.

Any help would be appreciated.
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#2
i looked this up a while ago, and i think he uses a pitch shifter and a sequencer to drop the note an octave and then raise it up again. You were closer than I was though. I thought he was using some sort of digital delay effect.

EDIT: http://www.musicradar.com/tuition/guitars/how-to-make-a-muse-map-of-the-problematique-style-guitar-sound-215249/2
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Last edited by psychokiller99 at Jan 3, 2010,
#4
I'm kinda hoping to replicate the sound with a live set up.

Any more help?
GEAR
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Last edited by Weeping_Demon7 at Jan 4, 2010,
#5
Any more help?
GEAR
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#8
Quote by WtrPlyr


I thought the slicer didn't come out that long ago?
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#9
^That's correct. I'm not saying Matt uses it (he uses a very complex synth path for it) but for someone who's looking to recreate that kind of effect the Slicer could do a pretty good job.
#10
Quote by WtrPlyr
^That's correct. I'm not saying Matt uses it (he uses a very complex synth path for it) but for someone who's looking to recreate that kind of effect the Slicer could do a pretty good job.

Could you add an octave pedal before it and get the sub octave kinda doo dad?
GEAR
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#11
I tried looking up this effect a while, it ended up hurting my head the number of different theories there were.
Quote by Kozlic
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#12
Quote by Forkman
I tried looking up this effect a while, it ended up hurting my head the number of different theories there were.

Did you come across anything?
GEAR
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#14
Sounds like it's just run through an appregiator.
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#15
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
Did you come across anything?

From what I remember you won't be able to recreate the effect exactly as Matt spent a large amount of money on synthesizers and sequencers etc.

""Map of the Problematique," we ended up putting down the guitars first because Dom was out of town. That song was originally all done on keyboards and I really wanted to hear it on guitar, but it was impossible - there was no way to play the keyboard part on the guitar. We spent about two days back-engineering what the keyboard part was on guitar. So it is actually a guitar that is going through three different modular synths that are opening up at different times. Two of the synths are routed into different pitch shifters - one is an octave up, the other is an octave down. Then we chose what octave we wanted to hear based on which synth we wanted to open up at which time. We had like an ARP 2600, some other things and a little spring reverb that was sort of playing the high octave. It was all done with hardware and the guitar was split into three: One went into the ARP 2600, Korg MS-20 and and EMS Synthi AKS."

I copy pasted this off some guy on a Muse forum who I thought got closest to the sound:

Quote by some guy
normal people who dont own a nord modular (e.g. everyone else) can use the effect if they have an effect pedal that has MIDI IN and whammy functionality across 2 octaves.. you also need a midi sequencer like cubase or logic to program the midi steps

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=gYAVzSviktY
an example of me playing it when i first wrote the patch with my pod xt live

aaand

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=sQPB9bxvPvI&feature=related
playing the song with my band after tweaking the patch i made.

i used cubase to sequence the whammy
Quote by Kozlic
Music doesnt need to be quality to be good.


Press eject, give me the tape, if you know what's good for you
#16
Quote by Forkman
From what I remember you won't be able to recreate the effect exactly as Matt spent a large amount of money on synthesizers and sequencers etc.

""Map of the Problematique," we ended up putting down the guitars first because Dom was out of town. That song was originally all done on keyboards and I really wanted to hear it on guitar, but it was impossible - there was no way to play the keyboard part on the guitar. We spent about two days back-engineering what the keyboard part was on guitar. So it is actually a guitar that is going through three different modular synths that are opening up at different times. Two of the synths are routed into different pitch shifters - one is an octave up, the other is an octave down. Then we chose what octave we wanted to hear based on which synth we wanted to open up at which time. We had like an ARP 2600, some other things and a little spring reverb that was sort of playing the high octave. It was all done with hardware and the guitar was split into three: One went into the ARP 2600, Korg MS-20 and and EMS Synthi AKS."

I copy pasted this off some guy on a Muse forum who I thought got closest to the sound:


Damn that last one is pretty good.
GEAR
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#17
if you have an autoriff with a user option that allows you to set up 16th notes, you could pull this off. there are 3 different patterns that are used in this song in addition to the normal distortion, so i had three different user autoriffs on my boss gt-10 with these settings for the autoriffing, with C as an example (- is down an octave, + is up):
1. C- C C+ C C+ C C- C C+ C C+ C C- C C+ C
2. C+ C C- C C+ C C+ C C- C C+ C C- C C+ C
3. C+ C C+ C C- C C+ C C- C C+ C C- C C+ C
so, i organized these into 4 patches, one for each autoriff and one for normal distortion. the only downside is that i need to keep on stomping on the pedal while playing guitar and singing, but it sounds pretty good. Also, master bpm = 125, tempo = 43, attack = 17. good luck!
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