#1
I have a 1976 4001. The bridge pickup would seem to have lost a ton of volume, even since I've had the bass (which has been about a year). I love the bass, but the loss of the tone of this pickup is not too favorable, so I have been looking for replacements. The Rickenbacker shop is closed, so I haven't been able to get pricing on their own replacements.

I've seen the Seymour Duncan SRB-1n and SRB-1b replacements (Seen here ), and was just wondering if these would have a good "Ric" tone. I'm a fan of the tones of Rics in general (and formerly my own). I like the fact that these are noise cancelling, and such. Anyone know much about these pickups vs. the replacements from Rickenbacker?

I just read under the Rickenbacker Guitar/Bass care manual from their website that pre-1984 selector switches almost cut the output of the treble (from what I read). Anyone know anything about this either?

Could any other Rick owners help me out here?
#2
Ive heard the SD's don't sound anything like a Rick.

But yet again that's a vintage you've got their. Im not going to say hang it on the wall or in a glass case or anything but keep it original, think in 30 years how much you could sell it on for if you wanted to.
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#3
The SD bridge pickup doesn't fit the pickup ring on ricks you have to use the plastic one they provide. The best thing you can do is go to rickenbacker. They sell replacement parts although they'll cost you an arm, leg and most of your liver.
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#4
Quote by fatgoogle
Ive heard the SD's don't sound anything like a Rick.

But yet again that's a vintage you've got their. Im not going to say hang it on the wall or in a glass case or anything but keep it original, think in 30 years how much you could sell it on for if you wanted to.


I'd love to keep it original...but I need a bass to play. :P

I think I will go for the Ricks, waiting for their shop to open...
#5
Pickups don't usually "die" on their own, so I'd have a technician look at the wiring on your bass before you spend money on a pickup swap. It may be a simple wiring problem.
#6
Quote by FatalGear41
Pickups don't usually "die" on their own, so I'd have a technician look at the wiring on your bass before you spend money on a pickup swap. It may be a simple wiring problem.


I had it in the shop, they looked at the wiring, and cleaned up the electronics a bit. Didn't help.
#7
In that case, you are stuck with replacing them. I'd stick with the stock pickups from Rickenbacker. I've never heard the Duncan replacements, and the only other replacement pickups I know of for the Rick are by Bartolini, which probably aren't going to give you a vintage Rick tone.

The later Rick 4003 has a push-pull pot to give the newer bass that treble cut sound of the old 4001 models. Getting rid of the treble cut was one of the changes that Rick made when they brought out the 4003 models.
#9
remember to keep the old pickups if you do decide to replace them; if it comes time to sell it it will maintain it's value.