#1
Hey guys, here's my problem:

I placed my thumb/rested it ON the pickup, diagonally (not exactly straight on it), but it started hurting my thumb (on the left side of my nail), and it started annoying me (to have to rest it for a couple of seconds before restarting), so I decided to place my thumb exactly straight (across the pickup) on the pickup. It didn't hurt, but after my practice session, my thumb hurt like HELL. It's like if I pulled that muscle... (it hurts in my palm, you know that muscle that goes into your thumb or something, I dunno how to explain it, but that's where it hurts).

Anyways, my thumb position ain't right technique if it hurts right? So...how/where do you place/rest your thumb??

Sorry for the confusing thread, but it hurts and I don't want to stop playing bass, so I want to know how to correct myself here

Thanks!
"You have brains in your head,
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You can steer yourself,
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You're on your own,
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And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
#2
I usually rest it on the pups, when I'm playing the higher strings i move it onto the E string, but it has never hurt my thumb.
My bass has a thunb rest built on it, which for some retarded reason is under the strings
#3
you have a problem. instead of fixing it, go for what is by some considered better technique and pull an Adam Nitti- thumb flat on unplayed strings, or or hovering-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SoLqaQmlx1Y

watch his thumb as he starts to finger the notes, as opposed to the sweeping intro.
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Last edited by the humanity at Jan 4, 2010,
#5
Quote by the humanity
you have a problem. instead of fixing it, go for what is by some considered better technique and pull an Adam Nitti- thumb flat on unplayed strings, or or hovering-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SoLqaQmlx1Y

watch his thumb as he starts to finger the notes, as opposed to the sweeping intro.


Oh, sorry, I forgot to mention it in my OP. I do place my thumb on the E string when Im not playing it, but I never drop my thumb below the E string. Should I?

Oh, and my thumb is OK when it's on a string, when it's on the pups (straight) , it makes me get cramps and pull that muscle after. If it helps, hears how I mute the strings...

E - I don't mute any other strings
A - I put my thumb on the E string.
D - Thumb on E string, plucking mutes the A string.
G - Thumb on E, Ring finger on A, plucking mutes D.

Is this good technique?

Ps: I was only playing the E string mostly (Another one bites the Dust), and the way I place my thumb when I play the E string is bad.

What should I do with my thumb, how can I improve my technique??

EDIT: Sorry, watched the video...

1. Holy shit that's a lot of strings.
2. So, bringing my thumb down would do the trick, but how would I pit my thumb when I play the E string?
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
Last edited by Rancid Ivy at Jan 4, 2010,
#6
Just don't over do it, Maybe stretch it more. I'm okay, I have ligament laxity.

Make sure you rest it more often, .
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#7
Sounds like you might be anchoring your thumb on the pickup. You just want to hover. You're probably putting lots of pressure on it that doesn't need to be there. Just barely graze the pickup when resting and you should be cool.
#8
^ indeed, off of the E, just hover.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#9
Okay, so right now, I'll practice my arse off until I get this technique right on:

E string - Thumb hovers, no muting
A string - Thumb on E string (therefore muting it also)
D string - Thumb on E string (mutes E, plucking mutes A)
G string - Thumb on A string (mutes E + A, plucking mutes D)

Sound like good technique??

Ps: I don't wanna make a whole other thread about it, so I'll ask here:

Is it normal that I hear whenever I fret ? For instance, I play Another One Bites the Dust, and when it goes 0 3 0 5, I hear the clicking of the frets loudly (it's even on the amp, but not TOO loud). I think it only happens when I play an open string and then a fret..

Ex: This buzzes: -0--5--0--2
This doesn't buzz (too much): 5--6--7

I'm thinking it's low action, but I'm asking just to make sure!

Ps: It also buzzes when I fret too hard :P
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss
Last edited by Rancid Ivy at Jan 4, 2010,
#10
Try raising your action, and cut your trebles, unless you want that click. But yeah, try floating thumb.

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#11
i sugest anchoring with the joint of your thumb instead of the end of it (if thats what your doing)

or use floating thumb
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#12
yeah guys, thanks! I'll cut the treble a bit, raise the action, and I'll try using floating thumb for a bit, and then try what the perdestrian said maybe.

Thanks for all, you guys are awesome!
"You have brains in your head,
You have feet in your shoes,
You can steer yourself,
any direction you choose,
You're on your own,
And you know what you know,
And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go."

- Dr. Seuss