#1
So I came up with a really nice riff yesterday, and after putting some power chords underneath the melody, I wanted to try writing a solo over the top of it. Its in the key of E Minor, but apart from playing notes from that scale I really don't know what I should be doing. So any advice would be appreciated.
#3
If you can afford it I'd say invest in a loop pedal for your practicing/writing.

I find it incredibly helpful to throw down a chord progression on my loop pedal and just jamming over it. It will help with creating musical melodies as well as lyrics.

If it's in Em and has some beefy power chords under it then the Em pentatonic should be all you really need to create a simple but effective solo.

I should practice playing lead more :-(
#4
In terms of simple phrasing you can put a little solo melody in at one "segment" of the Em pentatonic scale then move up the fretboard and mirror that melody with higher notes and you can always end the solo by descending/ascending back to the root note.
#5
Quote by reallink
So I came up with a really nice riff yesterday, and after putting some power chords underneath the melody, I wanted to try writing a solo over the top of it. Its in the key of E Minor, but apart from playing notes from that scale I really don't know what I should be doing. So any advice would be appreciated.


That's a hard question, but I'd say experiment and go at it by ear. Its hard to tell just by a description.
#7
Thanks for the tips guys. I've been working on some of this stuff and ended up with a really nice slow lick that sounds really nice
#8
Another thing you could try is a harmony bit. Just because you have something that you like now doesn't mean that you can't improve on it any. Believe me when I say this. I made this one song that my bro and I wrote so much better just by taking the basic idea and working it out with another idea I had.

One thing you can do with harmonies is take and create a solo using nothing but chord tones. Don't go too over the top with this, because what you can try is playing the next note in the chord above the one you're on. Typically, this will be a third, but not always when you start moving into chords with higher extensions. You'll also have some more difficult fingerings because of this.

Another form of harmony that works really well is harmonising in thirds. You can create some cool stuff but you're better off trying to move outside the box with harmonies than just doing thirds.
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#9
try having a structure for your solo. Vary points of tension and release for your solo and save the most intense parts for near the end of the solo.
#11
Ok. Here's what I would do if I were you.

a) RECORD the riff. It really helps to do that.
b) Improvise on it. During improvisation, you often come up with interesting stuff or a dominant melody that will make your solo stand out. RECORD your improvs.
c) Once you have the basic idea of the song going, add some colour to it. Some tapping licks, pentatonic stuff, legato, etc
d) Structure your song. Try to make your solo tell a story. Add some arpeggios over power chords. And I don't mean brutal sweeps or anything. Just some simple arpeggio melodies will make your song stand out. Try that.
e) after 40-50 takes, you will have your solo ready