#1
Is it possible to isolate or separate the vocals from a song track? If so, how?

Although the songs I would like to use are mp3s, I am open to using other audio formats. I intend to use these isolated/separated vocal tracks with Microsoft Songsmith (a program that generates melodies to fit vocal tracks).

If it is not possible to isolate or separate vocals from song tracks -- or, if the program that would make this possible is not readily available -- then is it possible to download vocal tracks from popular songs online for free? If so, where?

Thanks.
#2
First off, there is no 100% successful way to get the vocals or any other instrument separated from a stereo recording. Depending on how it's mixed, you can try to use Audacity with a plug-in called Voice Trap if the vocals are the only thing in both the left and right channels (so it sounds like they're in the center). Some older songs, like a lot of early Beatles stereo mixes, have the vocals panned on one side with the instruments panned on the other, so you can easily isolated them in audacity.

It's pretty rare to find isolated tracks from popular songs, but if you google for a multitrack or a capella version of it, there's a small chance you may find something. If the song is on Rock Band, you can probably get the vocal track pretty easily from that.
#3
Its never 100% sucessfull and it usualy sounds like garbage. The way the sound engineer finished the track off depends on if you can split the two tracks. I would recemend $2 karaoke song
-PV14 Mixer
-Crown XTI 1000 Amp
-Two PR15 mains
-Shure SM58
-Dbx compressor/gate
#4
Wait a sec... you want instrumental versions of songs... without vocals? Or you want just the vocal tracks?

To get just the vocal tracks... good luck. You'll need to get the master recordings from the studio.

To eliminate the vocals, your best bet is, as corvette said, to download a karaoke version from iTunes for $0.99. You'd be amazed at the variety of tracks they have on iTunes for karaoke versions.

It's either that or futz about with some software plugins, or doing it manually, separating the channels, inverting the phase on one, recombining, blah, blah, blah. In the end, you lose what effectively amounts to the center 'channel' coming through the speaker. That means, not only do you lose the vocal, you also lose much of the bass and the kick drum as well, and the vocal effects, which are usually panned, are still there. So, even after all that, you'll still have artifacts.

Just pay up $0.99 and be done with it.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Look it up on youtube. I tried it, didn't like it one bit. I do not know if I said it above, but most songs you can not do this to.
The thing that sucks with karaoke is the song key. If you have to transpose it to a key thats right for you, you might be SOL. They pretty much come in just one key. Actualy I believe most songs are already transposed in easier keys because a lot of karaoke singers are not that great.

Oh but then again, you can change the key with certain software.
-PV14 Mixer
-Crown XTI 1000 Amp
-Two PR15 mains
-Shure SM58
-Dbx compressor/gate
Last edited by jc71corvette at Jan 5, 2010,
#6
Quote by jc71corvette

The thing that sucks with karaoke is the song key. If you have to transpose it to a key thats right for you, you might be SOL.


Of course, you face the same limitations if you can successfully (more or less) remove the existing vocal track.

A lot of times, Karaoke versions will be produced in different keys. And yes, other times, it is the software that will do that for you.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.