#1
I was a bit confused on the whole interval thing. From what i know already can i just assume that an intervals are just so many notes in a scale before you reach an octave for example lets say 1 and 4 are octaves, can i assume that 2 and 3 are intervals?
#2
intervals aren't really the notes themselves they are more like the distance between the notes and there are different names for larger or smaller intervals i just dont remeber them anymore;p
#3
an interval is the space between two notes... whats so confusing about that?
example:
your root is C, so your (major) third is E and your perfect fifth is G ... just look at your guitar dude. try to visualize stuff like that, makes it lots easier
#4
Quote by Tim.Paragon
I was a bit confused on the whole interval thing. From what i know already can i just assume that an intervals are just so many notes in a scale before you reach an octave for example lets say 1 and 4 are octaves, can i assume that 2 and 3 are intervals?


Intervals


In music, the term interval is used to describe the distance between two notes. Intervals are named according to how many notes they encompass.


Ascending intervals:
ascending intervals are calculated by counting from the root up (forward through the scale)

C D E F G

C up to G is a 5th


C D E F G A B

C up to B is a 7th


Descending intervals

descending intervals are calculated by counting from the root down (backward through the scale)


C D E F G A B C

C down to G is a 4th


C D E F G A B C

C down to B is a 2nd


5 different interval types:

- Major
- minor
- diminished
- augmented
- Perfect


The intervals as found in the Major scale:

C major scale



C major scale / intervals


PU       M2       M3       P4        P5       M6       M7        P8   


P = Perfect
M = Major


minor, diminished and augmented intervals:

minor, diminshed and augmented intervals can be understood by comparing them to the Perfect and Major intervals.


minor intervals are 1/2 step smaller than Major intervals.

C - E = Major 3rd
C - Eb = minor 3rd

diminished intervals are 1/2 step smaller than perfect or minor intervals

C - G = Perfect 5th
C - Gb = diminished 5th

C - Eb = minor 3rd
C - Ebb = diminished 3rd

augmented intervals are 1/2 step larger than perfect or Major intervals

C - G = perfect 5th
C - G# = augmented 5th

C - E = Major 3rd
C - E#= augmented 3rd


Harmonic & Melodic intervals:


Harmonic intervals occur when 2 pitches are played simultaneously.


( harmonic interval of a Major 6th )


Melodic intervals occur when 2 pitches are sounded in succession.


( melodic interval of a Major 6th )
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 5, 2010,
#5
Good post GuitarMunky...

can u guys elaborate on why memorizing intervals are important? what are the applications??
Guitar.
#6
Quote by morethanever
Good post GuitarMunky...

can u guys elaborate on why memorizing intervals are important? what are the applications??
Well, you need to understand intervals, and how notes relate to each other in melody and harmony. I don't know how to explain why it's important, but I can tell you that it is absolutely necessary.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by food1010
Well, you need to understand intervals, and how notes relate to each other in melody and harmony. I don't know how to explain why it's important, but I can tell you that it is absolutely necessary.

The why is pretty easy, it helps you understand the major scale, singing and harmony etc., modes and how they relate back to the major scale, and I can tell you that intervals are absolutely necessary if you choose to study counterpoint.
#8
Quote by morethanever
Good post GuitarMunky...

can u guys elaborate on why memorizing intervals are important? what are the applications??

They're the building blocks of music - how difficult would it be to read, write and speak if you didn't know the sound that two adjacent letters made?

Same principle really, the goal in playing the guitar is to know what sound you're going to get when you move from one note to the next...if you can do that then you can play just about anything. Intervals are that shift in pitch that occurs when you change notes, and the important thing about intervals is that they're constant - a major third will always sound the same relative to any root, it's always the same difference in pitch from your starting note.

So, if you know what intervals sound like, understand how they work and know how to spot them on your guitar then eventually you'd be able to play a note and from there know where to go to get whatever sound you wanted.
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