#1
So, I found this random jack adapter ages ago and its been sat in my room as I thought it might come in handy one day. The adapter is basically one 1/4" jack input that splits the signal into two and is sent to two 1/4" outputs. Now, I was just wondering what it would sound like if I used it to play pedals in parallel to each other, Like this:



Would there be any benefits of this?

The reason I haven't done it is because I don't have enough Jacks to play around with, So I can't really try it out, and I also don't have a jack adapter that can pull the two signals into one (the opposite to what I have right now).
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#2
should work...it would be like using a couple of A/B boxes I think. Don't know how well it will sound though
#3
you mean these?



I have a feeling those jacks are built to mix two mono signals into one stereo jack and vice versa.
but it'll cost all of £1:50 or something to try it.
#4
Quote by PussyPunk182
I also don't have a jack adapter that can pull the two signals into one (the opposite to what I have right now).

Any one of 'em should do it
#5
haha, well what kind of sound would you expect? I was hoping to use it a bit like a FX loop, putting reverb and delay in one line and overdrives etc in another. I know it wouldn't be the same, but keeping them separate might change some thing? I don't know, I just like to experiment
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#6
Quote by jimRH7
you mean these?


I have a feeling those jacks are built to mix two mono signals into one stereo jack and vice versa.
but it'll cost all of £1:50 or something to try it.


Umm, Kind of. It's like a loose version of them. I'll put a pic up. It's virtually the same though. Pic in a sec.

Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
Last edited by PussyPunk182 at Jan 5, 2010,
#7
Quote by PussyPunk182
haha, well what kind of sound would you expect? I was hoping to use it a bit like a FX loop, putting reverb and delay in one line and overdrives etc in another. I know it wouldn't be the same, but keeping them separate might change some thing? I don't know, I just like to experiment
Your delay repeats/reverb trails will be clean. Might go into problem without a proper splitter/mixer.
These go to eleven...
#8
I've heard this causes phasing issues as well as an overly weak signal, but who knows?
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#10
Yeah mixing them back together with a splitter is a crap shoot. But you can always try it. Also splitting the signal right after the guitar is a recipe for tone suck. I depends on the output impedance of the pups and the input impedance of the pedals.
#11
Ok, well I have a small mixer that my dad gave me from when he used to film marriage videos and stuff and then cut them. It's a small 6 track mixer, with vol sliders, bass/treb knobs, those clipping gauge things. Really basic I think - (although I don't know much about mixers). So If I put the jacks from the pedals into two inputs of the mixer, then what do I do?

This is starting to come out sounding kind of useless, but I really want to try it out. I like experimenting
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#12
ok well you plug the first chain to the first channel and second to the second channel.. you put your designed settings on the EQs or leave em at 0 meaning they do nothing... you leave the PANs at 0 too... then you just plug mixers out to the amp

you can control your volume of each of the chain with it's vol fader.. pretty easy eh??
#13
Quote by PussyPunk182
This is starting to come out sounding kind of useless.

This. I can guarantee you this will not improve your sound in any way. It will make it different, yes, and I guess you may find it pleasing, but it is not going to be a better tone like you might get from an effects loop, like you had said before.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#14
If this is all running to an amplifier with a monophonic input, there will be phase cancellation issues. I've also found that use of Y-adapter cables results in noticeable gain loss and tone suckage. If you have a pedal with stereo outs and/or AB/Y box and an amplifier with stereo inputs and/or a second amplifier, these types of experiments tend to turn out more favorably. Also, the results may be passable if you are thinking of plugging directly into one of the stereo channels of your father's mixer and monitoring yourself through the mixer's headphone jack or a pair of external speakers connected to the mixer outs.
#15
Okay, well thankyou very much for all of the help. I've decided it'll be a lot of work for me to get my head around this - I don't know why but recently I've noticed I find much harder to understand this kind of stereo/mono/mixer/odd adapter stuff hard to get into my head.

But following this I've realised this thread has attracted some helpful UG'ers on the subject and I have another question which I could ask here. I am making a cabinet amp and I am hoping to wire it in stereo and mono so stereo effects can be used. Can someone explain to me how stereo effects are used, how to rig them up, and what I'm going to need to use them? Please include something on linking from a head to a cab. If I don't get many replies I'll just start a new thread but this should help keep the board a bit tidier.
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#16
You are making a "cabinet amp" and need stereo vs mono wiring advice? You are ambitious.

Is a cabinet amp a combo? You need two amps to make stereo, or a stereo amp. Stereo FX pedals will have two outputs.
#17
Quote by fly135
You are making a "cabinet amp" and need stereo vs mono wiring advice? You are ambitious.

Is a cabinet amp a combo? You need two amps to make stereo, or a stereo amp. Stereo FX pedals will have two outputs.

I think he means a speaker cabinet.

TS - No offense but you've demonstrated a pretty poor knowledge on these types of things already, so I wouldn't take on a project that big quite yet. But if you must stereo just means two jacks on the speaker cabinet with 2 speakers on one jack and 2 on the other (this applies to 4x12s only.) You would need two amp heads, as Fly135 said, though.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#18
Ok well don't worry about it. You're right, I have very little experience in wiring etc at the moment, I just like to experiment and I hadn't had the chance to do what I wanted - as I've never really had the resources to learn first hand. I'll just do a mono I guess. I'll do more research into it. Thanks for everyone's help.
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
Last edited by PussyPunk182 at Jan 7, 2010,
#19
Quote by PussyPunk182
Ok well don't worry about it. You're right, I have very little experience in wiring etc at the moment, I just like to experiment and I hadn't had the chance to do what I wanted - as I've never really had the resources to learn first hand. I'll just do a mono I guess. I'll do more research into it. Thanks for everyone's help.

Ya I'm getting into this stuff too, but I heard people on here talk about stuff for over a year before I tried my hand, and I still only do very simple wiring things, nothing too complex. Just take it little by little. First get a handle on soldering, and series/parallel circuits, then move on from there.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!