#1
I know thats not what they are called but I have been messing around with these things I would call reverse power chords sort of. Its like lets say the shape is:

A-2
D-4

U know simple. I would do something like:

A-4
D-2

Like swap the notes u know. I was wondering what is that called. What kind of chords are those? Is it a distinct kind?
#2
Do you mean :

e X
B X
G X
D 4
A 2
E X

and

e X
B X
G X
D 2
A 4
E X

If so then the 'reverse power chord' is actually an interval of a minor third.
#3
It's called a minor third.

The power chord is a perfect fifth.
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#4
^As he said, it is a minor 3rd interval.

Taking the lowest note as the root, in your case, C#, you could say that it is a C# minor chord without the 5th. Although the correct convention is to call it a dyad.

A dyad being a 2 note "chord", defined by the interval betwen the pitches.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Jan 5, 2010,
#5
The first one is a minor third.

A true "reverse" power chord (inverted) would be like
e X
B X
G X
D 7
A 7
E X
which is the first inversion of
e X
B X
G X
D 2
A 0
E X
Just taking the top note and putting it on the bottom, which makes it a fourth interval now.