#1
How are some ways to effectively change keys? How do I know which key to go to next? I don't know anything about changing keys so ANY tips at all would be very much appreciated, thanks!
Gear:
Ibanez VBT700 V-Blade
Ovation Celebrity CSE24
Line 6 Spider III 15 watt
Line 6 Spider III 50 Watt
(working on getting rid of these amps...)
Crybaby Wah 535Q
MXR fullbore metal
#2
One way is add the Dominant for the new key. For example, if I were going key of C major to D I could add an A7 and then go to D.

For you to make use of this knowledge in situations, you'd want to know:

How to compose any Major scale
How to determine the chords that can be built from each note of that major scale (Creates a Harmonized Major scale - a selection of chords that work well within it.)
How to label the chords in Roman Numeral or some sort of notation which allows you to know the Dominant chord in each Key.

And away you go!
#3
thank you very, very much =]
Gear:
Ibanez VBT700 V-Blade
Ovation Celebrity CSE24
Line 6 Spider III 15 watt
Line 6 Spider III 50 Watt
(working on getting rid of these amps...)
Crybaby Wah 535Q
MXR fullbore metal
#5
In addition to what Sean said about the perfect cadences (V7-I) keys that are common to go to are keys with a similar number of sharps and flats.

For example, if you are in C then there are 0 sharps or flats. So keys you might want to go to are F (1 flat), Bb (2 flats), G (1 sharp), D (2 sharps) or their relative minors.

Obviously you can go to any key you want but the more different the keys are, the harder in general it is to make it sound smooth. Also, a lot of making key changes sound smooth is the melody on top.
#6
Quote by 12345abcd3
In addition to what Sean said about the perfect cadences (V7-I) keys that are common to go to are keys with a similar number of sharps and flats.

For example, if you are in C then there are 0 sharps or flats. So keys you might want to go to are F (1 flat), Bb (2 flats), G (1 sharp), D (2 sharps) or their relative minors.

Obviously you can go to any key you want but the more different the keys are, the harder in general it is to make it sound smooth. Also, a lot of making key changes sound smooth is the melody on top.


True. Here's a few other facts about key changes - Key changes which modulate a step or two higher, can make a song seem less boring without the listener being instantly aware of the key change. A good example of this, , is George Strait's Amarillo By Morning.

Cheap Trick's Surrender has not one, but two key changes in it gradually getting higher, which elevates the song to a different level, energy-wise without the usual association with key change being immediately obvious.

Hope this helps!
#7
you guys are the best =]
Gear:
Ibanez VBT700 V-Blade
Ovation Celebrity CSE24
Line 6 Spider III 15 watt
Line 6 Spider III 50 Watt
(working on getting rid of these amps...)
Crybaby Wah 535Q
MXR fullbore metal
#10
You could use a jazz progression that goes II V I (relativev to the key you're changing to). If you want to go from say key of E to key of D, the progrssioin would be E A D. This works because the A is diatonic in both keys, and is a very neutral interval from both E (perfect 4th) and D (perfect 5th).

EDIT:
In addition to the II V I progression, you could just follow the circle of 5ths
/4ths to your desired key. This is also very common in jazz.
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Last edited by CHOCOmoney at Jan 6, 2010,