#1
OK, so a random question i know, but i was playing today and wondered just how hot those tubes get..
so if your playing for say 2 hours and pushing the tubes pretty hard, (lets say a 7 on a scale of 10) with no real breaks..how hot in Fahrenheit are the tubes getting? I'm sure one of you gear masters out there knows

Thanks
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#3
don't rest your ball sack on them you'll singe the hair and melt ya sack
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#4
I dunno man, but my new Vox Night Train gets pretty hot after maybe 30 minutes of steady play. Way hotter than my Mark IV. I guess it's because the Mark IV has a cooling fan, but still. the Night Train melted ice cream that was sitting on the cabinet!
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#5
It makes all my switches and knobs and screws, basically the whole amp hot.

maybe around 2-250 degrees F
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#7
Quote by Clinical Notes
don't rest your ball sack on them you'll singe the hair and melt ya sack

It would take a real man to put them on there for a minute...sadly after the minute you'll no longer be a man
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#8
my hybrid marshall 8080 combo melted a piece of candy that i left on it, and it was hard getting it off of the amp at first but umm yeah they can get extremely hot if you're playing a high wattage amp loud enough, definitely not something you'd want to touch
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#9
more importantly, who gives a shit about farenheit?
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#10
474C -885 F Red heat, visible in the twilight
525C Red heat, visible in the daylight

thats for metal, tubes filaments might get this hot though
Last edited by Tempoe at Jan 6, 2010,
#11
I've measured the EL84s in my amp at 285 degrees F (140C). I imagine on a hot stage in a combo some tubes might get well over 300.

I don't think those 4-500 degree figures are relevant here, the heaters will glow orange but they are in a vacuum. I don't think the outside of the tube would get nearly that hot.
#12
Quote by Tempoe
474C -885 F Red heat, visible in the twilight
525C Red heat, visible in the daylight

thats for metal, tubes filaments might get this hot though


the metal probably does, however theyre in a vaccuum, so only radiated heat will reach the glass, so i think theyd get to around 150C ish
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.
#15
I'm a bit of a chemistry nerd so I'll bite on this one...

There is no real conversion here if I was to do a rough estimation (and I mean rough...), using a simple thermodynamics equation q=cdT where q is heat, c is heat capacity of the medium, so let's say... we measure only the heat that is dissipated from a tube's plate, lets say a tube has a plate dissipation of 21 watts if you bias it to 70% max dissipation... which is 21 joules of heat energy per second. The change in temperature that this causes is dependent on the plate, it's composition and it's mass. If you're really curious, you can do this calculation yourself by looking up the heat capacity of the plate material (idk what they're typically made of) and it'll give you your answer in celsius, but keep in mind that this number doesn't really tell you a lot, it tells you how much heat you dissipate per second, obviously if you're playing for several hours, it's going to get much hotter and also, it doesn't take into account all other tube elements that radiate heat.
#16
Quote by stevo_epi_SG_wo
more importantly, who gives a shit about farenheit?

This. Most arbitrary scale ever devised.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#17
Quote by al112987
I'm a bit of a chemistry nerd so I'll bite on this one...

There is no real conversion here if I was to do a rough estimation (and I mean rough...), using a simple thermodynamics equation q=cdT where q is heat, c is heat capacity of the medium, so let's say... we measure only the heat that is dissipated from a tube's plate, lets say a tube has a plate dissipation of 21 watts if you bias it to 70% max dissipation... which is 21 joules of heat energy per second. The change in temperature that this causes is dependent on the plate, it's composition and it's mass. If you're really curious, you can do this calculation yourself by looking up the heat capacity of the plate material (idk what they're typically made of) and it'll give you your answer in celsius, but keep in mind that this number doesn't really tell you a lot, it tells you how much heat you dissipate per second, obviously if you're playing for several hours, it's going to get much hotter and also, it doesn't take into account all other tube elements that radiate heat.
...

in english please.
#18
^ That was english. He just used real units like Joules and degrees centigrade instead of the hilarious ones like calories and fahrenheit.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#19
Quote by bubb_tubbs
^ That was english. He just used real units like Joules and degrees centigrade instead of the hilarious ones like calories and fahrenheit.
I was joking.
#20
I'll give you 2 experiences my friend had with his tiny terror
1. The plastic orange badge on the tiny terror (combo) melted after a few hours gigging
2. later, he decided to experiment so he left the amp running and in about an hour or 2he'd managed to toast a piece of bread which was sitting on the tube.
#21
Quote by p o e
I dunno man, but my new Vox Night Train gets pretty hot after maybe 30 minutes of steady play. Way hotter than my Mark IV. I guess it's because the Mark IV has a cooling fan, but still. the Night Train melted ice cream that was sitting on the cabinet!


+1

The Night Train gets hotter than any other amp I've owned.
#22
Quote by Roc8995
I've measured the EL84s in my amp at 285 degrees F (140C). I imagine on a hot stage in a combo some tubes might get well over 300.

I don't think those 4-500 degree figures are relevant here, the heaters will glow orange but they are in a vacuum. I don't think the outside of the tube would get nearly that hot.


That sounds about right ..

The KT-88s in my amp run 230-250 degrees F. In standby they're about 140 degrees F.
That's the outside temp of the glass.
#23
Quote by al112987
I'm a bit of a chemistry nerd so I'll bite on this one...

There is no real conversion here if I was to do a rough estimation (and I mean rough...), using a simple thermodynamics equation q=cdT where q is heat, c is heat capacity of the medium, so let's say... we measure only the heat that is dissipated from a tube's plate, lets say a tube has a plate dissipation of 21 watts if you bias it to 70% max dissipation... which is 21 joules of heat energy per second. The change in temperature that this causes is dependent on the plate, it's composition and it's mass. If you're really curious, you can do this calculation yourself by looking up the heat capacity of the plate material (idk what they're typically made of) and it'll give you your answer in celsius, but keep in mind that this number doesn't really tell you a lot, it tells you how much heat you dissipate per second, obviously if you're playing for several hours, it's going to get much hotter and also, it doesn't take into account all other tube elements that radiate heat.


that has nothing to do with chemistry, as usual, it's physics to the rescue!
Get off this damn forum and play your damn guitar.