#1
Like the title says, can anyone give me some information on these chords. I've been playing with them a lot but I dont know much about them other than the notes that are used to make them up. For example, what key could i solo in order to be in key with this chord progression etc.

Chord 1 to Chord 2

here is chord one
EGD

here is chord two

DAE


I guess maybe I could play in C major pentatonic? I dunno....
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#2
Looking at the first note of each as the root:
Em7 or Eø. It's pretty ambiguous without the fifth though. It all depends on context.
Dsus2. This one is missing the fifth too.

I was going to write them with different roots, but decided it was pointless, because those are pretty much the most functional roots.
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#3
Quote by food1010
Looking at the first note of each as the root:
Em7 or Eø. It's pretty ambiguous without the fifth though. It all depends on context.
Dsus2. This one is missing the fifth too.

I was going to write them with different roots, but decided it was pointless, because those are pretty much the most functional roots.

The Dsus2 isn't missing the fifth, the A is the fifth.
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#4
Quote by CHOCOmoney
The Dsus2 isn't missing the fifth, the A is the fifth.
Haha right. Thanks. Brain fart...
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#5
So if I wanted to adds some lead parts to it, which key would I solo in, and what scales could I use?

Noted: -E and D are the root notes
- the second chord is Dsus2 and A is its fifth
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"
#8
Niiice, why E phrygian?
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#9
Quote by wHere_aM_i
Niiice, why E phrygian?


The notes of the chords are all part of E phrygian.

You could use E minor pentatonic ...it depends on the sound you're after.
Last edited by SJPitrellifan at Jan 6, 2010,
#10
But, aren't all the notes of E phrygian the same notes found in other modes such as D dorian?

Maybe its anything that falls into the key of C maj, which are all those modes?

What kinds of things are in the key of C maj?

Maybe I'm overthinking things? Its good to ask questions.....
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Last edited by wHere_aM_i at Jan 6, 2010,
#11
Quote by wHere_aM_i
But, aren't all the notes of E phrygian the same notes found in other modes such as D dorian?


Yeah, but what key are you in?
#12
is E Minor pentatonic in the key of C maj???
"I have a large fridge at home and I've been eating alot of pork chops"
#13
Quote by wHere_aM_i
is E Minor pentatonic in the key of C maj???


Nope. E minor is the relative minor of G major.

A minor is the relative minor of C major. And they aren't the same keys, they just have the same notes/number of sharps/flats in them.

It's all about where your tonic or root note is.
#14
So given that we know its all about the tonic or root note. How would that help me with respect to my situation, or in this case, the two chords i mentioned above? In orther words, you must have used that to determine E phrygian as the scale to "solo" in but what do the root and tonic note of the chords have to do with getting e phyrgian. Do you understand?
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#15
Quote by SJPitrellifan
Nope. E minor is the relative minor of G major.

A minor is the relative minor of C major. And they aren't the same keys, they just have the same notes/number of sharps/flats in them.

It's all about where your tonic or root note is.

technically couldnt E minor pentatonic be in the key of C?

all the notes of E minor arent in the key of C, but all the notes of E minor pent. are in the key of C.

so he could use the E minor pentatonic.

but just like someone already said, its all about the sound hes after.

EDIT: his chord progression inst strictly in the key of C anyway. E phrygian means theres an F, but there is no F in Em7 or Dsus2.

it could be in the key of C, the key of G, or the key of D.
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Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Jan 7, 2010,
#16
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
technically couldnt E minor pentatonic be in the key of C?

all the notes of E minor arent in the key of C, but all the notes of E minor pent. are in the key of C.

so he could use the E minor pentatonic.

but just like someone already said, its all about the sound hes after.

EDIT: his chord progression inst strictly in the key of C anyway. E phrygian means theres an F, but there is no F in Em7 or Dsus2.

it could be in the key of C, the key of G, or the key of D.


No.

The key of a piece of music is determined by the note that the piece wants to resolve to. TS's progression can't resolve to C because it doesn't have one to resolve to. To use E minor Pentatonic the progression would resolve to an Em chord, which it does; Em7. Yes, the notes of E minor pent are in C maj, but the scales are constructed differently so sound different. C maj is 1 2 3 4 5 6 7, E minor pent is 1 b3 4 5 b7
#17
Quote by SJPitrellifan
The notes of the chords are all part of E phrygian.

You could use E minor pentatonic ...it depends on the sound you're after.

The notes are also part of C major, D Dorian...and B Locrian.

Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
technically couldnt E minor pentatonic be in the key of C?

all the notes of E minor arent in the key of C, but all the notes of E minor pent. are in the key of C.

so he could use the E minor pentatonic.

but just like someone already said, its all about the sound hes after.

The notes from the E minor pentatonic can be in the key of C but if you were in the key of C those notes would no longer be called the E minor pentatonic.
#18
Quote by wHere_aM_i
Niiice, why E phrygian?


I applied the music theory I know, and teach guitar and music theory every day and it fit. For you to understand why, you should have a strong understanding of triads, chord construction, diatonic harmony, Modes, and their relative and parallel approaches.

I don't know of an effective way to shortcut you through to the conclusions I made, I can only tell you that those are skill sets that you should have.

Now, my approach to teaching these concepts are quite different, but for someone that is in your situation, here are some other ways that you might want to assemble the knowledge:

Select whatever path seems best to you, and go learn to write out any major key - Use whatever method you feel works best for you. Then go start writing pages of them, however long it takes. Maybe someone else has a different idea, but there are plenty of lessons here, that I am sure can ultimately get you to the same place.

Next, take a key and start working out all the modes within the key, and spell them out. Do that for as long as it takes to become second nature, and have a solid understanding.

Then - using whatever method you have to learn all your triads, learn to spell them out correctly.

Using these skills you can then apply any notes and any chords to try and figure out for yourself what's going on and what you can play.

Those are the skills which I used in analyzing what you had there.

Hope this helps you learn to understand what you should do if you want to be able to learn and apply theory in a systematic way. Assuming that you don't take lessons and want to learn everything from lessons available here etc. Mike Dodge has a number of self study type lessons that might be an option.
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 7, 2010,
#19
Why E Phrygian

Bad Bad teaching.

If TS assumes this exclusively E Phrygian, then he would not know that the most (aesthetically) important interval b2 gives the typical Phrygian character.

Even less ambiguous would be a b2 in conjuction with a b5 (Even though Locrian is hardly ever implied, it's still important to know.

In this it would be an F.

To TS


Use Em pentatonic over it or a regular Em scale.

You could use E Phrygian as well, but without a b2 interval, the whole character of what is 99% of the time implied with Phrygian is obsolete.

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#20
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Why E Phrygian

Bad Bad teaching.

If TS assumes this exclusively E Phrygian, then he would not know that the most (aesthetically) important interval b2 gives the typical Phrygian character.

Even less ambiguous would be a b2 in conjuction with a b5 (Even though Locrian is hardly ever implied, it's still important to know.

In this it would be an F.

To TS


Use Em pentatonic over it or a regular Em scale.

You could use E Phrygian as well, but without a b2 interval, the whole character of what is 99% of the time implied with Phrygian is obsolete.
For God's sake, this.

IT IS NOT PHRYGIAN, NOR IS IT MODAL AT ALL. It certainly could be if you altered it a bit, but it's far too ambiguous. There's not even an F in there anywhere, which is the only thing that separates the phrygian mode from the minor scale, aside from the fact that phrygian is modal and the natural minor scale makes MUCH more sense in this situation.

Looking at the notes you have (EADG), you could be in the key of C, Am, F, Dm, G, Em, D, or Bm. Well, this doesn't help much, so now you have to look at the chords. You have an Em7(no5) (or Eø(no5)) and a Dsus2. If these are the only chords in the whole song, this narrows it down to Em, D, or Dm. It's really completely up to you where you go from here. You can probably forget about the Eø, since the b5 in it is more essential to the tonality of it than of the 5 in the Em7. This eliminates Dm. Depending on how the melody/lead line go, you can make the song either in D or Em.

To be honest though, you could really make the song in any of the above mentioned keys, just with most of them you'd have to do a bit of manoeuvring in the melody line to determine the tonality.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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Last edited by food1010 at Jan 7, 2010,