#1
Searched, nothing really came up.

Thesis:

In Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and The Hobbit, while encountering a series of difficult adventures, the protagonists gradually change, developing heroic characteristics while recognizing their roles as leaders.

I'm writing an essay on an idea that the Fellowship of the Ring and the Hobbit shares and just wondering if I could strengthen it, tweak, edit, etc ...

Any advice/suggestions are appreciated.


BTW. I know this is the pit, but I thought it was worth a try.

EDIT: It's on an essay question btw., it's MY thesis that I'm writing for an essay, and I'm just curious if it's makes sense, strong, grammatically incorrect, etc.
Last edited by DGen92 at Jan 6, 2010,
#4
Well The Fellowship of the Ring and The Hobbit should be italicized. That's a start.
#6
I always thought that, while definitely growing into their leadership roles, were not the greatest thinkers of their time.

I mean, why didn't anyone just suggest riding the Eagles to Mordor?
#7
I had the same question last year but for an exam. ^ and dude the eagles didnt do it in the firts place because the eagles werent aware at the start and probaly wouldnt help. Im a lotr nerd do not argue with me
------------------------------------------------------------------------
your insane, but reasonable
#8
Quote by captaincrunk
I'd report but someoen probably already has by now. We have a thread for this man, search real quick?


Could you tell me the name of that thread?
Because I can't seem to find it.
#9
Quote by phlip999
I always thought that, while definitely growing into their leadership roles, were not the greatest thinkers of their time.

I mean, why didn't anyone just suggest riding the Eagles to Mordor?

They didn't use eagles because the eagles didn't want to interfere in the wars of men/hobbits/elves/etc...

That and the fact that the Nazgul had their Fell Beasts that would have torn an eagle to shreds mid-flight.
#10
Quote by XianXiuHong
You do realise that's about one of the easiest essay questions you'll get.

It's basically plainly telling/explaining to you what it wants without any ambiguity.
I think he wrote the question himself, which is why it's bloody awful.

I don't think any decent English teacher would set a question as vague as that.
#11
Quote by phlip999
I always thought that, while definitely growing into their leadership roles, were not the greatest thinkers of their time.

I mean, why didn't anyone just suggest riding the Eagles to Mordor?


Why didn't Gandalf just teleport him and Frodo into Mount Doom. "Yo, Sauron, you're doin' a great job and Ima let you finish...but the Ori are the best disembodied villains of all time. All time!"
#12
My essay question on LOTR:

"What can Tolkien's essay 'Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics' tell us about The Lord of the Rings?"

Yours is now officially pish.
#13
Lol, the essay might as well be 'in this book, there is character development'.

Write about something interesting, something which, I dunno, doesn't happen in every other book ever.
#14
I like the thesis that The Hobbit and LOTR are a metaphor for Tolkein's own homosexual tendencies, and his favoritism of interracial sex.

Seriously...Think about it...


I mean, Dracula by Bram Stoker can be argued as merely a reflection of Stoker's homosexual relation with Oscar Wilde.
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#15
Quote by DGen92

In Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and The Hobbit, while encountering a series of difficult adventures, the protagonists gradually change, developing heroic characteristics while recognizing their roles as leaders.


I'd work on the whole first paragraph. On an essay with the first sentence you're supposed to restate the question, and then in the thesis it is supposed to be a map to your three body paragraphs. I'd mention what you're planning on talking about to make up your thesis, like 'traits at beginning of book,' 'transitional traits,' and 'heroic traits' not exactly like this but something similar. Then in the third paragraph you can add a little bit of a fun fact type thing such as "Tolkien wrote the Hobbit characters into the middle earth stories to represent the home front in World War Two."


This is just the way we were instructed to do introductory paragraphs in AP European History, the intro paragraph is by far your most important in any essay though.


Wait if you're writing it on what ideas the two books share? Look into the symbolism of the LOTR, some people suggest that Gandalf is a symbolic Jesus character, others say that the whole thing is supposed to be WW2. You could also talk about the problem of addiction regarding the Ring with Smigil/Gollum and Frodo and Bilbo.
Due what you want as long as you vote Due!
Last edited by tayroar at Jan 6, 2010,
#16
I'd use Tolkiens full name, and put it after the titles, like

"In The Fellowship of the Ring, and The Hobbit, written by JRR Tolkien, the protagonists..." so on, and so forth.
#17
The LOTR and the Hobbit are both reflections of Tolkien's observations of men and their coming of age in the trenches of France during WW1.
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#18
Quote by Tubyboulin
I'd use Tolkiens full name, and put it after the titles, like

"In The Fellowship of the Ring, and The Hobbit, written by JRR Tolkien, the protagonists..." so on, and so forth.

That just makes it incredibly boring, like you're ticking off points on a list. Do something more general for an introduction. Perhaps something about the development of heroes in fantasy novels, the motif of them coming unexpectedly from a simple country upbringing and turning into a great hero etc, then make that relate specifically to your points about LOTR.
#19
Quote by SmarterChild
That just makes it incredibly boring, like you're ticking off points on a list. Do something more general for an introduction. Perhaps something about the development of heroes in fantasy novels, the motif of them coming unexpectedly from a simple country upbringing and turning into a great hero etc, then make that relate specifically to your points about LOTR.

I was under the impression he was asking for help with a Thesis, not an introduction. Sorry if he wasn't.

TS, if it's the full first paragraph your looking for advice on, then yeah, do what this guy says. Teachers hate essays with a boring opening.
#20
Quote by DGen92
Searched, nothing really came up.

Thesis:

In Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring and The Hobbit, while encountering a series of difficult adventures, the protagonists gradually change, developing heroic characteristics while recognizing their roles as leaders.

I'm writing an essay on an idea that the Fellowship of the Ring and the Hobbit shares and just wondering if I could strengthen it, tweak, edit, etc ...

Any advice/suggestions are appreciated.


BTW. I know this is the pit, but I thought it was worth a try.

EDIT: It's on an essay question btw., it's MY thesis that I'm writing for an essay, and I'm just curious if it's makes sense, strong, grammatically incorrect, etc.


Idk what english class you're in right now, but just for reference i'm in 11th grade AP Lang/Comp (so you can choose to disregard or listen to me based off of that)

Your thesis is aight but you could execute it in a much more "classy" way:
For instance:
"In both The Fellowship Of The Ring and The Hobbit, Author J.R.R. Tolkien depicts his main characters as unlikely heros who gradually begin to take on strong roles as leaders as they face arduous challenges throughout their adventures and gain the respect of their comrades."

But I don't know what your prompt is and I haven't read either of those books in like 5 years so yeah...
Last edited by Schism1985 at Jan 6, 2010,
#22
Quote by phlip999
I always thought that, while definitely growing into their leadership roles, were not the greatest thinkers of their time.

I mean, why didn't anyone just suggest riding the Eagles to Mordor?