#1
My google-fu is probably weak, but I can't seem to find a decent "lesson" or "tutorial" on arpeggios. I'd like to work up and down the neck a bit and most of the youtube lessons I've seen are just guys burning up and down the fret board. I'm still relatively new.

I realize arpeggios are basically walking chords up the neck, but I still don't know all the notes on the neck well and thought it might be a good way to learn and work my hands out.

Thanks!
Edwards Les Paul 92
Roland Micro Cube
Marshall JCM 900 4501
#2
All you need to know REAAALLLY is that they're broken up chords.

You then need to know your chords, and your fretboard. Hahaha.

http://www.guitar-dreams.com/guitarlessons-req-view_fulllesson-lessonid-12.html

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/arpeggios_guide_part_1_-_learn_your_arpeggios.html - Second link on google under "lessons on arpeggios".
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#3
Do you understand how chords are constructed and know how to find intervals on the neck? If you do then for a major arp - take C for an example - you can find your root note (C), then play a Maj 3rd above it (E), then play a minor 3rd above that (G), and a Major 3rd above that (B) and you've got yourself a Major 7th arpeggio. Go up a semitone (min 2nd) from your B and you're back to your root note a octave above where you started.
#4
Yeah, I know I need to learn my fret board. It would make it much easier. I just figured as I was playing through an arpeggio I could learn the notes and make it a fun way to learn it, and get a good hand workout.

I started out playing a woodwind, where I only was concerned about playing one note at a time and had maybe 20 different fingerings for all the notes. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around the guitar. it's a whole different mentality.
Edwards Les Paul 92
Roland Micro Cube
Marshall JCM 900 4501
#5
It might be easier to start out learning triads - that covers basic chord construction and will help you learn the neck.

Then you can extend that to learning their inversions, and when you put them together you'll start seeing arpeggios across all 6 strings. Then you just modify them slightly to form different types of arp - with extensions etc


The other thing to do is start learning to find intervals if you can't already. If you can play a power chord you can already find a 5th. If you can tune by ear you can already find a unison. Start recognising what all your octaves and unisons look like and you've suddenly drastically reduced how much effort you need to put into learning the notes.

Don't forget if you learn one E string you know both, and the notes repeat above the 12th fret - so you only actually need to learn 5 strings up to the 12th fret in any case, and if you learn all the natural notes you will almost by default know the sharps and flats, as you can find them easily from the natural note.
#6
Quote by zhilla
It might be easier to start out learning triads - that covers basic chord construction and will help you learn the neck.

Then you can extend that to learning their inversions, and when you put them together you'll start seeing arpeggios across all 6 strings. Then you just modify them slightly to form different types of arp - with extensions etc


The other thing to do is start learning to find intervals if you can't already. If you can play a power chord you can already find a 5th. If you can tune by ear you can already find a unison. Start recognising what all your octaves and unisons look like and you've suddenly drastically reduced how much effort you need to put into learning the notes.

Don't forget if you learn one E string you know both, and the notes repeat above the 12th fret - so you only actually need to learn 5 strings up to the 12th fret in any case, and if you learn all the natural notes you will almost by default know the sharps and flats, as you can find them easily from the natural note.


This.

Also, if you played woodwind, I'd hazard a guess at your ear being relatively good in terms of relative hearing. So you may know what a perfect fourth interval sounds like already, we don't know.

There are lots of different types of arpeggio too, it can get almost silly, the fingerings.
Quote by santa_man99
THANK you. I love you forever.


Quote by DrFuzz
Why are you researching for Christmas? It's only Ma- HOLY CRAP WHERE'S 2009 GONE!?!?!?


Quote by ilikepirates
You're right, that is weird. You win.