#1
hey plp. wassup?

im thinking of upgrading from my squier....ive had it for two years now. but i was hoping to skip the "intermidiate" guitar, and just buying a really good guitar that will last me for years before i even want to replace it. something i can take to gigs, and record with.

so basically i guess im asking whats the best professional guitar, for the price. and by this i mean some guitars are good, but overpriced like gibsons in my opinion
(i think...). so what do you guys think?

oh and i would like to play hard rock, classic rock, and blues. and since i want a good guitar i guess price range is over 500 dollars....im not really sure how much a good guitar is...
#2
is it everything over $500? give us a cut-off budget for us to work with.
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#3
hm. really need a whole lot more info. do you like tremolo systems, or hardtails? any body woods you like or really dislike? single coils ok, or are you a humbucker guy? any body shape preferences? prefer shorter or longer scales? and do you know how high your price range can go, or as close to $500 as we can get it? i'm positive this forum can come up with a good list of guitars to check out with all this info.
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#4
yea sorry guys i just wasnt sure about the budget.
i would say ideally 700-1500.
as for preferences, im not to picky but im sure i want humbuckers, and a solid body guitar. i dont have a wood preference but i like fast necks(maple i think like on fenders) cause ive played some glossy ones that slow me down in my opinion, and the neck not too wide like on sg's.


i hope that helps.

thanks again!
#5
how about you name some of your favorite bands too? those are some pretty broad styles.
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#6
well some of my favorite bands are guns n roses, jimmy hendrix, eric clapton, cream, led zeppelin, pink floyd, black sabbath, deep purple.

but basically the sound im going after is guns n roses appetite of destruction. i want to do hard rock. not to thrash like metallica though.

some guitars in my opinion give too much of a sharp sound like in some heavy metal, i want something that flows....i dont know if that made sense
#7
Your best bet is to go out and try guitars new and used until you find something you going to want to keep. Don't make your decision by the price high priced guitars are not necessarily the best.

When I get asked to play, I gig with what ever guitar I feel like hauling to the gig. Some guitars I take most people wouldn't consider gigging with like my Jay Tursers etc. You do not need a pricey guitar to gig or last a long time! My cheap Hondo "STING" I bought 30+ years ago still looks as good as it did when I got it and I love gigging with it because it is a real head turner. I have friend who trashes high end guitars all the time, in a short time. I take pride in taking care of my gear and that is the key to making it last! A lot of these guitars that national bands use have been repaired and rebuilt many times in the years they have been using them.


John
#8
the problem with that is that i dont know how diffirintiate from a crap overpriced guitar and a good guitar. so i was hoping to get some suggestions, but after that yea defenitivly ill go to the store and try them.
#9
I think you are a great candidate for a PRS SE guitar. They are great for the money in my opinion and make great hard rock guitars. I think the necks feel better than Les Pauls but that is just my opinion. I had a '01 Gibson LP Studio and one of the first Santana SE's when it was the only SE in production. I used to play it more because of the neck feeling smaller overall and the body being lighter even though it was a solid mohagany piece like the LP. The LP sounded bettr but I think that was because of the Gibson Humbuckers used. There are even better SE models made now plus you can find some cheaper american PRS models that can fit into the top of your budget. That models I had would be kind of like the Custom SE 22 they have now in the way it was setup.

Ibanez makes great guitars with way faster and thinner necks if you are into that type of guitar. A lot of people that play metal love the RG series but there are other model lines that are great. I have a RG I play now but I'm wanting to get a new 2010 S model coming soon because they are going to a standard 24 frets in that line instead of only the S Prestiges having them. The S also has a ZR tremelo system that uses a ball bearing system which people seem to like better than the regular edge typd trem found on many of their other models.

Schecter guitars are really great if you like the necks. They have beautiful finishes and use quality parts even on their lower end instruments. You can get a great guitar with brand name pickups, sometimes coil-tapping, and usually grover or locking tuners standard. That just depends on the model line you look at. I wish more companies would embrace the coil-tapping as Schecter and ESP seem to have here recently.

There are ESP's, Jackson's, Gibson's, Fender's, Agile's, Hamer's, Dean's, and many many more companies so I'm stopping right here because I could go on and on. You might want to look at Musician's Friend, then make a wishlist of guitars you like, research them, and print out the list to take to some stores for you to refer to and try these instruments out. That's my advice. Good Luck!
#10
ok. well any preference on bodystyle or weight?

i recently have been tinkering on the Carvin website. you can get a VERY good guitar for very reasonable price. however 700-1500. thats double the price. thats like asking recommend me a car anywhere from a honda to a BMW. you have a world of options.

however any carvin is good and quality. ALSO, its pretty much custom. you can select thier BOLT model (just an example) and add anything. specific woods, finishes, inlays, FRET SIZED AND MATERIALS (i found that quite nice, most people dont offer that), etc.

if you are good with your hands and stuff, you can assmeble the guitar yourself which takes about half the initial price off. i might do that myself. (all holes and cutting are already done, it literally is a bolt together job and setup action etc....but only if your comforatable doing that kinda think to save money).

Godins make some SICK guitars. G&L makes some SICK guitars.

fenders are solid guitars. cant deny it. however i maintain a good carvin, g&l, or godin just shats on any fender. thats just me.

you can get a gibson, but you say they are over priced. i do like the SG raw powers though. cheaper for gibsons too.

you can maybe pick up a cheaper PRS?

for that money i would try out as many guitars as you can. ALSO, do you have a quality amp? the guitar wont really matter if your running it through garbage. better a mediocre guitar through a fantastic amp than a fantastic guitar through a mediocre amp IMO. cause your not getting your worth out of that 1500 guitar if you cant hear it cause your crap amp sound is smothering the 1500 sound.
#11
By the sound of it, something like a Gibson SG Standard would suit you. It's not quite at the top of your price range (so I would assume you could comfortably afford it), it's very versatile, they come with fast Gibson 60's necks, it'll last you for basically forever and it's really good value for money in terms of the spec and build quality you get. The only thing is Gibson guitars tend to vary wildly so you need to get down to a store and play a few to make sure you get a good one - buying online isn't smart unless you're happy with the idea that you may have to keep returning several guitars until you eventually get sent a nice one that fits you.

That's what I'd start with anyway. At least give a Gibson SG a try in a shop, see how it takes you. It's such a good all-round guitar it's a great point to start at; if you find it sounds too bright or too dark or something about the feel of it puts you off it's then easy to tell what you should go for. It's a really good yard stick to measure your preferences by.
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#12
PRS: SE series. Short for Student Edition. These are PRS's lowest end models, which makes them the guitar equivalent of a low end BMW. Try one out, they're awesome.

Schecter: Depending on what looks and pickups you want, I'd go with the C-1 Blackjack (comes with or without a whammy bar), Tempest Classic, Solo-6 Classic, V-1 Classic (if you're into V's), C-1 Artist II, the soon-to-be-released C-1 custom, or the very-recently-discontinued C-1 Classic. VERY IMPORTANT: UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD YOU EVER BUY A SCHECTER WITH A LICENSED FLOYD ROSE. THERE IS NO WAY YOU'RE EVER GOING TO GET THOSE TO STAY IN TUNE.) If you want a whammy bar on a schecter that works for hard rock, do a little extra googling and find the C-1 Blackjack FR. That's the only temolo equipped Schecter that fits your requirements that will stay in tune and sound good without some major aftermarket upgrades.

Ibanez: Pretty much any of the Prestige models, depending on exactly what you're looking for. The same warning about Schecter's licensed floyds applies to the Ibanez Edge III, even though the edge takes a while to get to that point. My personal reccomendation would be this in the finish of your choice, but any ibanez costing OVER 1000 dollars will do just fine as long as you pick properly. Try them first.

ESP: You don't play metal. These guitars exist solely so that people can use them to play metal. Don't buy an ESP. As amazing as the necks are, they're a bad fit for you.

Gibson: Don't buy anything from the Raw Power series and you should be fine. It is important to note that Gibson necks are extremely thick. Other than that and a few quality control/overpricing issues, they're fine.

Jackson: See ESP

Dean: See Jackson

Carvin: I've never had the privelige of playing one, but I'm told that they're incredible. Plus they give you the option of picking exactly what you're looking for in a guitar. My personal dream: California CT6 in blueburst with gold hardware on a plain maple top, with a Wilkinson tremolo.
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#13
Quote by FrustratedRocka
PRS: SE series. Short for Student Edition. These are PRS's lowest end models, which makes them the guitar equivalent of a low end BMW. Try one out, they're awesome.
They're not that awesome (I've played eight of them to date: they've all been utter shit) and they're only like a low-end BMW if the car in question was the result of a cut and shut job. The PRS SE guitars are not worth looking at, ever. For the same money there are a ton of copy brands that make proper PRS copies (full carved tops included) which are outright better in every respect than the PRS SE guitars. With a PRS SE, you're getting something that is the build quality of any standard Epiphone or ESP-LTD guitar only without the carved top, with actually worse electronics and twice the price because it's got the PRS reputation slapped on it. Even if the PRS SE guitars were half the price, they would not be worth it when Tokai give you a better guitar, much closer to an actual PRS for less than half what a PRSE SE costs. Even Vintage do a better PRS copy than PRS do with the PRS SE line.
More to the point, a PRS SE guitar is nowhere close to being a pro guitar.

Schecter:
You tell him not to bother with ESP but you give the go-ahead to Schecter?

Ibanez:
See above comments about Schecter, only even more so as Ibanez are even closer to ESP than Schecter are.

ESP: You don't play metal. These guitars exist solely so that people can use them to play metal.
Tell that to Ronnie Wood and Richie Sambora, both ESP endorsees with signature ESP guitars.

It is important to note that Gibson necks are extremely thick.
No they're not. The 50's necks are only marginally thicker than a Fender neck and the 60's slim taper necks are in fact slimmer than a Fender neck on average (specifically at the lower frets; at the higher frets they're about the same).
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#14
Just spitballing, but a new Gibson SG as has been stated before would be a good option.

I'd also look into used American PRS guitars. I'm almost positive you can pick up a Mira in your price range, and possibly a Custom 22/24, depending on your preference.

Another Gibson to look at, honestly, would be a Les Paul. The smooth tone you're describing just about screams LP to me.
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#15
A USA Fender Strat is about as good and versitile a guitar that you can buy. You can probably get a used one for $500-600. If you want a humbucker in the bridge, go with the Fat Strat, or you can easily mod the regular strat and put in any pickup you want.
I own 2 PRS's, a Gibson SG STD, and 3 USA Strats. The Strats play and sound every bit as good as the more expensive ones.
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#16
+1 on the PRS SE. Awesome quality for your $
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#17
The only problem with the PRS SE comments saying that they are bad is that's just someone's opinion. The only comment made about them that's not totally true is the one stating that they are copies. They are not copies at all. They are just made in a Korean factory versus an American PRS factory. I'm pretty sure I read some articles about Paul going over there to inspect and lay out the process used for these guitars. That makes them real PRS's that say PRS on the headstock. That's like saying a made in Mexico Fender Strat is just a Fender Strat copy. I've never seen someone say that because it's not true. Most people will agree that the build quality of a SE is above that of an Epiphone Les Paul type guitar. Epiphone is just used as an example for comparison in that last statement.

I don't like the other comments made bashing the other brands either. Some people like edge trems vs. floyds vs. something like a kahler vs. something like a zr. You can get almost any trem to stay in tune if setup properly from the start.

TS one person may not always like what another person likes and that's why you should go play multiple instruments before making a choice. That also why I made the suggestion of making that wishlist, doing some research as your doing now, and play some you have interest in.
#18
Quote by FrustratedRocka

Schecter: VERY IMPORTANT: UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD YOU EVER BUY A SCHECTER WITH A LICENSED FLOYD ROSE. THERE IS NO WAY YOU'RE EVER GOING TO GET THOSE TO STAY IN TUNE.)



A mate of mine, has a Schecter Omen 6 extreme FR, and he's FR stayed in tune all the time..? It's about setting it up right..?
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#19
To Threadstarter;

you could probably get some nicer shit used, if the fact that it's previously owned deters you, than stick with something new.

When you go to a guitar shop, play each guitar unplugged first, if sounds and/or feels like shit, or it just doesnt feel right to you, move on to the next one.

for that kinda money, you dont want to dump your money into a piece of shit and end up not liking it

if it sounds and feels nice unplugged you have yourself a good guitar, regardless of brand because you can always do pickup swaps


My list of reccommendations that everbody else has probably mentioned

Gibson:

LP Classic/Standard (used)
SG Standard
Explorer
Flying V

Fender:

American Deluxe Stratocaster/Telecaster new or used, depending on how much you are willing to spend. (You can go HSS strat or with a telecaster you can install a JB jr or hotrails or any other minibucker of your choice in the bridge.)

you would still get that big humbucker sound if you have a decent amplifier

for that price range you have an array of cool options to choose from, dont be biased on a brand, keep an open mind

there are some really good jacksons, ibanez' schecters and esps and anything else for that price range, so it really is your call, you gotta research yer shit.

we cant really tell you what to like and shit, but none of the guitars are bad, it's just different strokes for different folks more or less.
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Last edited by LPstudioWRz28 at Jan 7, 2010,
#20
Quote by seth's daddy
A USA Fender Strat is about as good and versitile a guitar that you can buy. You can probably get a used one for $500-600. If you want a humbucker in the bridge, go with the Fat Strat, or you can easily mod the regular strat and put in any pickup you want.
I own 2 PRS's, a Gibson SG STD, and 3 USA Strats. The Strats play and sound every bit as good as the more expensive ones.


This is also true!

TS there are other many guitar brands that use coil tapping. That can give you even more versatility if you find a guitar you like with that feature built in. There's nothing like being able to go from double humbucking to single coil mode on the fly.
#21
Actually I will throw this in too: Fender American Deluxe SSS Strats have every combination of singlecoil and humbucker tones available to them. The HSS option is there too if you need a more hard-hitting bridge tone and better vibrato action (the HSS has a roller nut), but the SSS version can do humbucker tones well enough for most classic rock uses. Really great, all-round guitar. The only drawback to them is they are very much jack-of-all-trades, masters-of-none. Really worth checking out though.
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#22
Quote by Quaned
A mate of mine, has a Schecter Omen 6 extreme FR, and he's FR stayed in tune all the time..? It's about setting it up right..?


I would hope that people could have trem equiped guitars that stayed in tune or there would be no point in owning one. I know plenty of people that use different trem types that maintain their gear without tuning problems. I use fixed bridges but that's another personal preference example.