#1
I've been thinking a lot this couple of months, and I wanna be a music teacher instead of a chef. Actually, I'm studying culinary arts for my diploma. My dad wanted me to study management but I have zero interest in it but have slight interest on cooking. Thing is, I'm 20 this year, and I have no papers that will help me get into a music college (I've never actually taken formal lessons and exams). If I were to start going to lessons and taking exams, I'm gonna need a minimum of grade 5 to qualify myself into a music course and getting that grade 5 is gonna take me ages (though I dunno how long will it take). Should I just forget becoming a guitar teacher? If you were me, what would you do? I have personally spoke to a professional musician and he told me I definitely need a degree and above to teach.
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#2
I made a post recently How did YOU get into teaching? Have a read through some of the replies and you'll realise that you don't necessarily need qualifications to teach.

So long as you have the ability to communicate effectively, have the knowledge to share and the drive to make it happen; then you can teach.
#3
It depends where you want to teach, if you want to become a music teacher in schools you will need a degree.

If you want to become an instrument tutor I don't think you need any formal qualifications just the attributes Myshadow46_2 stated.
#4
My friend went from grade nothing to a qualified full time teacher in about 2 and a half years after he'd set his heart on it. He did the London Royal College of Music exams, all self taught and didn't study music at uni. I dunno if that helps...
To be honest I don't really see the point in studying an art at uni, you can learn all the necessary stuff to teach all off your own back, without having to fork out silly money for tuition fees.
#5
I'm going through something very very similar atm. I have no formal qualifications but I am currently doing my music theory grade 5. How easy this is to pick up depends mainly on your basic knowledge of music theory (scales, chordal make up etc). I have picked it up quite quickly but a lot of it is putting names to things I already knew.

By the way I'm 23 this year and have a qualification in Accounting but I would rather gouge my eyes out that be in that career for the rest of my life. I figure if try now and fail then at least I won't look back later and wish I did.
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#6
Quote by bonzo_lives
I'm going through something very very similar atm. I have no formal qualifications but I am currently doing my music theory grade 5. How easy this is to pick up depends mainly on your basic knowledge of music theory (scales, chordal make up etc). I have picked it up quite quickly but a lot of it is putting names to things I already knew.

By the way I'm 23 this year and have a qualification in Accounting but I would rather gouge my eyes out that be in that career for the rest of my life. I figure if try now and fail then at least I won't look back later and wish I did.

Wait, you can actually go straight into music theory grade 5 instead of going through grade 1,2,3,4?
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#7
Yes you can. Well in the UK any way not so sure about the rest of the world.
Fender P Bass Mex

Guitar Set Up
Fender Strat Mex (Modded)
Toadwords Leo Jr
Vox Wah V847
Electro Harmonix LBP-1
Line 6 FM4
Boss DD-20
TC Electronic Tuner
Orange Tiny Terror(ist)


Check out my band
www.asparagusnow.com
#8
I was in the same boat as you, I had been doing the music without any actual proof for years. I decided to do a higher diploma first. I did that intensively for a year and that took me up to theory level 7 which meant I was then eligible to go for a degree. I then choose my degree and ive just started that. The other good thing about this route is, you learn so much while your doing the higher diploma about yourself as a musician that you might not necessarily have learnt with out exploring things.
#9
Quote by Divalicious
I was in the same boat as you, I had been doing the music without any actual proof for years. I decided to do a higher diploma first. I did that intensively for a year and that took me up to theory level 7 which meant I was then eligible to go for a degree. I then choose my degree and ive just started that. The other good thing about this route is, you learn so much while your doing the higher diploma about yourself as a musician that you might not necessarily have learnt with out exploring things.

Ah I wish I could take that path, but I need the grades before getting into a music college, wtf. Anyway, I asked a local music store today, he told me the ABRSM exams are every 6 months once. I thought they were monthly!
MY GEAR
Ibanez SA160QM
Laney HCM10
Squier Bullet Strat
MXR Carbon Copy
Zoom Tri Metal
Modtone Flanger(mini)
EHX LPB-1
Korg Pitchblack
Timtone acoustic
#10
I'm gonna revive this old thread.

I've been looking around, and found this music college. It's a local one. Apparently they accept people without certificates and all that. It's for people who couldn't afford to enrol themselves into a music school and take tests. I'm considering to join after I finish studying culinary arts which is end of this year. They will have an audition to see if you're good enough to join them. What are things that they usually check during an audition?
MY GEAR
Ibanez SA160QM
Laney HCM10
Squier Bullet Strat
MXR Carbon Copy
Zoom Tri Metal
Modtone Flanger(mini)
EHX LPB-1
Korg Pitchblack
Timtone acoustic
#11
I haven't got ANY music grades, and i've just been accepted to one of the best courses in the country.

And if you're 20, who cares what your dad wants? You're an adult, you can do what you want to do. Cut the apron strings!
#12
Quote by Broken-pick
I'm gonna revive this old thread.

I've been looking around, and found this music college. It's a local one. Apparently they accept people without certificates and all that. It's for people who couldn't afford to enrol themselves into a music school and take tests. I'm considering to join after I finish studying culinary arts which is end of this year. They will have an audition to see if you're good enough to join them. What are things that they usually check during an audition?


Make sure they're an accredited school, first. Nothing worse than shelling out thousands of dollars just to find yourself with a worthless degree. You've probably already done this, but it's worth the reminder.

They'll probably test your proficiency in your chosen instrument, as well as your knowledge of scales and theory, and probably some keyboard proficiency as well.
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Quote by MuffinMan
Jesus was all like "To those about to rock, I salute you." then he grabbed his mighty axe and rocked the Romans out really hard. Of course they were strict classical music so....
#13
If you want to teach in the school system, there is no way around getting a degree.

Now, your degree doesn't *have* to be in music - at least in Ontario - unless you want to teach beyond grade 10. That means that, technically, you could teach elementary school music or a grade 9 music course, even though your degree is in Math or something. Now, the reality is that you'll likely find yourself competing for that job with someone who has a degree in music, and guess which one will get hired.

About needing good grades to get into a university music program....

First, a friend that I did my music degree was actually going back to school. He had his first degree in Engineering. He stated that some of the counterpoint classes and stuff were every bit as difficult as anything he ever did in engineering.

Second, your music degree will require you to take non-music courses as part of your graduation requirements. In order to be successful in those academic courses, you need to be a successful student going in. Otherwise.... no degree. You've just wasted your time and money.

I don't think I know of any university that requires you to actually have papers saying that you have completed such-and-such a grade in conservatory training or whatever; nor do they care how you got to where you are. They just care about whether you have what they expect of their entrants to the program. This is usually:

- a playing audition - typically somewhere between grade 8-10 Royal Conservatory of Music. If I were you, I'd err towards the top end.
-sight-reading - yes, real notation
-ear training - identifying intervals (perfect fourth, minor sixth, whatever) and chord qualities (major, minor, dominant, dim7).
-perhaps an interview
-academic grades consistent with most other university programs.

When I decided to go into music, I had basic note-reading, and the facility to play a boat-load of rock music, and a couple of very simple classical pieces. My ear was awful. My theory was already relatively good. From there, it took me two years - practicing roughly 3 hrs a day, with weekly instruction from one of Canada's best players - to get good enough to get in.

So, you don't need to spend 10 years or start studying as a child to get in, but in any case, it takes a LOT of work and dedication to get there.

CT


CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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