#7
That's about as DIY as you can get without jamming a metal rod connected to your multimeter into the tube socket.
#8
Quote by warrenduane
That's about as DIY as you can get without jamming a metal rod connected to your multimeter into the tube socket.


No, DIY is strapping a resistor across the cathode, and measuring plate V so you can actually get a proper bias reading.

That item will work on your amp for it's intended purpose, but realize the readings you'll get are only one half of the story.

There's no way to get a plate voltage reading, so you'll just be ballparking it anyway.
#9
Do you even have to bias a deluxe reverb, with my deluxe it isnt necessary, well not because you replaced the tubes anyway. If you have a problem with the sound then you should check it.
Last edited by sstony at Jan 7, 2010,
#10
Yep, you have to.
If you don't, it's not like the world will implode, but you're risking either drastically short tube life (too hot), or a pretty lifeless, sterile( IMHO) sound (too cold).

For the most part, fixed bias amps require biasing.
#11
Quote by Rutch
Yep, you have to.
If you don't, it's not like the world will implode, but you're risking either drastically short tube life (too hot), or a pretty lifeless, sterile( IMHO) sound (too cold).

For the most part, fixed bias amps require biasing.

I´m not disagreeing with you but I´ve had my deluxe since 85 amd have never had it biased and it sounds just like the day I bought it. But I think the next tube replacement I´ll have it checked.