#1
Intervals.

Example:

e|----0-------------|(E)
B|----1-------------|(C)
G|----0-------------|(G)
D|----2-------------|(E)
A|----3-------------|(C)
E|-------------------|(X)


I understand that the Interval from C of the A string to the E of the D string is a Major 3rd, and the Interval from the E of the D string to the G of the G string is a Minor 3rd, thus making the Major Triad.

However the G of the G string to the C of the B string would be a perfect 4th, and that, I know is not correct. This seems contrary to interval inversion, because if I inverted the C an octave higher (as in the chord) then i have a perfect 4th.
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#2
You just calculate from the root mate...

C > E = major third
C > G = perfect fifth
C > C = perfect octave

You see? That's just an octave, nothing about a perfect fourth... That's not how you should see it.
It's just a duplicated note, nothing else. You're thinking too difficult.
#3
G to C actually IS a perfect fourth. doesn't matter what strings it's on, or how many frets you moved. If the G is the lower note, C is the perfect fourth. but we don't call it a Csus4 because you're looking at two notes WITHIN a chord. the note of C functions as the root/octave within a chord.
#4
Quote by frigginjerk
G to C actually IS a perfect fourth. doesn't matter what strings it's on, or how many frets you moved. If the G is the lower note, C is the perfect fourth. but we don't call it a Csus4 because you're looking at two notes WITHIN a chord. the note of C functions as the root/octave within a chord.


You're right on that.
#5
Quote by STE 969
However the G of the G string to the C of the B string would be a perfect 4th, and that, I know is not correct.
You damn well better believe it is! A perfect fifth inverted is a perfect fourth.

Play a power chord (with the octave). You'll notice that the distance between the 5th and the root an octave up is a perfect fifth.

Edit: Damn, they beat me to it. Good advice.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jan 7, 2010,
#6
My mind is all over the place...

How would I know what the root of an unfarmiliar chord is?
How would i calculate these unfarmiliar chords?
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#7
Also, my wording is quite terrible. I know that it is correct that an inverted perfect 5th becomes a perfect 4th... >.<
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#8
Quote by STE 969
My mind is all over the place...

How would I know what the root of an unfamiliar chord is?
How would i calculate these unfamiliar chords?
Fixed.

But, to answer your question, you'd look at all the notes, and see if it fits a logical pattern. Sometimes chords are ambiguous without context, and can be seen a few different ways.

Quote by KoenDercksen
You just calculate from the root mate...

C > E = major third
C > G = perfect fifth
C > C = perfect octave

You see? That's just an octave, nothing about a perfect fourth... That's not how you should see it.
It's just a duplicated note, nothing else. You're thinking too difficult.
Just thought I'd quote this simply to emphasize how true it is.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jan 7, 2010,
#9
Thanks for the help!

No doubt I'll be back here soon for my next confusion episode!
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#10
As a general rule of thumb, when figuring out an unfamiliar chord, try rearranging the notes into stacks of 3rds to see what it is in root position. Sometimes a particular note may be missing, but you can figure it out if you remember that most chords are root-3rd-5th-7th-etc. If instead of a 3rd you have a 2nd or 4th and the rest is in 3rds, you have a suspended chord.
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