#1
Okay, I got these scale formulas from a ug lesson:

Ionian Mode 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
Dorian Mode 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1
Phrygian Mode 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Lydian Mode 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1
Mixolydian Mode 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1
Aeolian Mode 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Locrian Mode 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 1

Does this mean that if I applied these formulas to the C Major scale, then I would end up with C Dorian, C Phrygian, C Lydian, etc.?
Call me Andrew. It's my name.

Quote by theogonia777
i fond God too, man! i sat next to him on the bus once. he told be the meaning of life and then gave me a pretzel. i can't remember what the meaning of live was, but it was a good pretzel, man!
#4
Quote by GoIrish668
Okay, I got these scale formulas from a ug lesson:

Ionian Mode 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1
Dorian Mode 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 1
Phrygian Mode 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Lydian Mode 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1
Mixolydian Mode 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 1
Aeolian Mode 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1
Locrian Mode 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 1

Does this mean that if I applied these formulas to the C Major scale, then I would end up with C Dorian, C Phrygian, C Lydian, etc.?



yes that is exactly what it means
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#6
Quote by tenfold
Well yeah but you need a modal backing vamp to make it modal.


You dont have to vamp just to make something modal you know...

And the goal of learning modes is almost never to play modal music
#8
Quote by tenfold
What other way is there?


You could just play a melody without a backing that suggests chords/a vamp and resolves to the correct tonic.
#9
Quote by timeconsumer09
You could just play a melody without a backing that suggests chords/a vamp and resolves to the correct tonic.
That's cheating!

But really, implying a vamp and then pretending there was no vamp is kind of ridiculous. No, there isn't a rhythm guitar playing the vamp, but you're still playing as if there were.
#10
Quote by timeconsumer09
You could just play a melody without a backing that suggests chords/a vamp and resolves to the correct tonic.

Possibly, but you will eventually need a backing, and that will have to be a modal one.
#15
Quote by tenfold
Yeah like 40 years ago. Just saying it's very unlikely, thus the generalization.

generalizations are bad.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's cheating!

But really, implying a vamp and then pretending there was no vamp is kind of ridiculous. No, there isn't a rhythm guitar playing the vamp, but you're still playing as if there were.
Cheating? I'd say its a darn sight harder! Playing over a vamp you don't have to worry about trying to make it sound modal or resolving to the wrong place - the vamp does it for you and leads you to resolve to the right place, assuming you have and even vaguely decent ear. I'd say trying to make something sound properly modal without any backing is a lot harder - at least it is for me.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No you won't. Implied chords are perfectly valid.


Not valid for the person who asked the original question. To make use of this, youd have to have a well developed sense of the mode to start with to understand how best to imply the modal tonality. These aren't rudimentary solutions, but come with time patience practice and experience.

This guy doesn't seem to know the modes that well to start with, so in practical terms, that detail is useless relative to the knowledge and experience level of the TS.
#18
Quote by Sean0913
Not valid for the person who asked the original question. To make use of this, youd have to have a well developed sense of the mode to start with to understand how best to imply the modal tonality. These aren't rudimentary solutions, but come with time patience practice and experience.

This guy doesn't seem to know the modes that well to start with, so in practical terms, that detail is useless relative to the knowledge and experience level of the TS.


How is that useless? He can construct any mode now, which is where you should start when learning modes, and now he should learn how to apply them. It is pretty dumb to think that modes can only be used over a certain vamp. Learning to apply the modes is not that hard, look up the theory, and apply it. The end. Better to tell him how it is before he becomes one of the morons who "plays" E phyrgian D dorian and B locrian over a C major progression.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#19
Quote by blueriver
How is that useless? He can construct any mode now, which is where you should start when learning modes, and now he should learn how to apply them. It is pretty dumb to think that modes can only be used over a certain vamp. Learning to apply the modes is not that hard, look up the theory, and apply it. The end. Better to tell him how it is before he becomes one of the morons who "plays" E phyrgian D dorian and B locrian over a C major progression.



Laughing, at that last statement, so true! But the reason its useless for him is because it's running before he even learns to walk. How is he going to imply chords before he even knows how to intelligently understand and play the modes over a vamp? Implication and getting modal with a melody and no backing track is not the first step, its several layers in after you've experimented enough to understand the tonal center of that mode and make use of the characteristic tones, and to make the melody in such a way that it doesn't WANT to pull back to the Ionian.

As for the last statement, I explain to students that they are playing the notes of x mode which has the FUNCTION of an extended Ionian because of the chord progression.