#1
Hey all, I'm looking everywhere for a good Contemporary Music College. So far Berklee looks the most promising. Does anyway happen to know where I can find a list of Modern Music Colleges? Thanks in advance.
Learning more about music and all its glory one post at a time.
#2
Humber College in Toronto has a really good jazz program, if you're into jazz. It's pretty close to Michigan, although I guess it depends where in Michigan you live.
#3
Im sorry dude, but berklee is sort of a joke.

If you want to major in guitar, the only respectable majors are classical or jazz.

Berklee is the only school that offers contemporary guitar, and its for a reason. Every real college knows that actually offering a major in contemporary guitar is ridiculous
#4
I noticed that you list your location as Michigan. Normal colleges offer music programs. Look into U of M and MSU. I like the idea of staying in-state (despite the fact that I don't go to school in PA) as you're not really at any kind of advantage if you go to a state school elsewhere and it's markedly less expensive, but other nearby schools are probably good as well.

You could also look into Juilliard. (The "haha" is directed at their admission requirements, which make Yale look tame, not you.)
#5

Berklee is the only school that offers contemporary guitar, and its for a reason. Every real college knows that actually offering a major in contemporary guitar is ridiculous


look at the jazz guitarists (and general musicians) berklee has produced. There you get a strong background in jazz harmony in addition to whatever contemporary music stuff you want to persue (though its rare to go 100 percent jazz, many students do as much jazz as a jazz major elsewhere and also get some contemporary experience). they also have a fair deal of contemporary classical music.
Places like North texas (also amazing jazz progam) and Miami (IIRC) also have contemporary music.
#6
Quote by tubatom868686
Im sorry dude, but berklee is sort of a joke.

If you want to major in guitar, the only respectable majors are classical or jazz.

Berklee is the only school that offers contemporary guitar, and its for a reason. Every real college knows that actually offering a major in contemporary guitar is ridiculous



Well, I looked into Berklee 'cause Chris Caffery (TSO, Savatage) and Steve Vai both attended there.... and they both play the kinda music I'm aspiring to play (at least in style.... lol).

Also I asked for a list because I may be moving to the south within the year (GA, FL, or SC) so any contemporary schools down there are welcome as well. Thanks again for any help.
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#7
Quote by esiewertjr
Well, I looked into Berklee 'cause Chris Caffery (TSO, Savatage) and Steve Vai both attended there.... and they both play the kinda music I'm aspiring to play (at least in style.... lol).

Also I asked for a list because I may be moving to the south within the year (GA, FL, or SC) so any contemporary schools down there are welcome as well. Thanks again for any help.

Berklee just went WAY up on my list. Hall of the Mountain King is one of my favorite albums.
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#8
Indiana University has an extremely good jazz program.

If you're really wanting to jump into the industry, I heard Musician's Institute was a pretty good place. I talked to someone who went there and he said it wouldn't be worth the money though but it will teach you how to be a better player and hopefully get you gigging soon.
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#9
What is your ultimate goal by going through a program such as this? Your answer will be a huge factor in what sort of program you should apply for.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by axemanchris
What is your ultimate goal by going through a program such as this? Your answer will be a huge factor in what sort of program you should apply for.

CT


In the best way possible, I'd have to say, I want to KNOW music.... I want to have a foundation in theory but I want to master the guitar the best that I can....sure I want to play fast...but I don't wanna play fast if it doesn't sound good. I want to take classical style elements (I'm very much influenced by Vivaldi) and put them in a modern rock/metal atmosphere.
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#11
Okay, so the degree or diploma is unnecessary in order to achieve your goal.

What I would do in that situation is to contact someone who is a killer private instructor and see if you can study with them. They'll teach you theory too, probably, if they're *that* kind of player.

Maybe, like going to college, even consider moving to another town so you can study with that person for a year or two or whatever.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by smartalec007
Berklee just went WAY up on my list. Hall of the Mountain King is one of my favorite albums.

Too bad Criss Oliva played on that album then, huh?

I go to Western Michigan University, which has a huge jazz program. There are very few colleges that do "contemporary" music programs, which I assume you mean to be rock. If you plan on pursuing music in college, you best brush up on your classical or jazz chops.
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#13
Honestly, I considered that. Lol I wanted to be taught by Chris Cafferey then I saw he went to Berklee so I figured that would seem like the more...realistic idea lol. The thing is I will most likely consider both, but I really can't consider both unless I'm able to accurately weigh the possibilities.
Learning more about music and all its glory one post at a time.
#14
My friend is currently wrestling with the question of which school to attend and all the guitar teachers he's consulted with seem to think that Wayne State is the place to be in Michigan.
#15
Quote by tubatom868686
Im sorry dude, but berklee is sort of a joke.


This is the first time I have heard this from anyone. I'm suspecting this person has some kind of vendetta.

Berklee is top notch.
#16
Apparently Duquesne (in Pittsburgh) has a top notch jazz program.
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#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I noticed that you list your location as Michigan. Normal colleges offer music programs. Look into U of M and MSU. I like the idea of staying in-state (despite the fact that I don't go to school in PA) as you're not really at any kind of advantage if you go to a state school elsewhere and it's markedly less expensive, but other nearby schools are probably good as well.


I know several people who have come out of the music program at UMichigan and had good experiences, although they were studying composition rather than performance. (The performance program may be good as well, but I don't know anyone who's done it).
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#18
I think a contemporary course is just as relevant to a musician as a Jazz or classical. It really depends on what your future playing focus is and how the course would help that focus. Unfortunately I am from the UK so I can only recommend UK schools. The last time I checked, Berklee is regarded as one of the most respected schools in the WORLD. This is due to its outstanding level of education, in all areas, classical OR contemporary.
#19
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I noticed that you list your location as Michigan. Normal colleges offer music programs. Look into U of M and MSU. I like the idea of staying in-state (despite the fact that I don't go to school in PA) as you're not really at any kind of advantage if you go to a state school elsewhere and it's markedly less expensive, but other nearby schools are probably good as well.

You could also look into Juilliard. (The "haha" is directed at their admission requirements, which make Yale look tame, not you.)


Yale's music school is only a graduate school, and they don't offer a Jazz program. Only classical. And Julliard....5% acceptance? Yeah. Best of Luck (not to say you're not good, I've never met you...but Berklee and Julliard are two VERY different schools).

Really, I'd look into learning some jazz stuff and finding some schools that offer degrees in Jazz Studies (and allow you to audition with Jazz too). There aren't too many schools that will respect you playing a rock song or whatever for an audition or whatever it is. There are however, many schools that offer "Jazz and Contemporary Music" degrees. That being said...one school I'm auditioning for has the requirements of two solo pieces, any style.
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#20
Quote by inanevoyage
This is the first time I have heard this from anyone. I'm suspecting this person has some kind of vendetta.

Berklee is top notch.




K dude. Go to berklee, and get your degree. There might be 3 or 4 big names you can list that made it out of berklee; but Id be interested to find out how many of their graduates ever find work

A lot of naive guitarists hold berklee on a pedestal because they think they think its a realistic way to get a degree in music, without having to learn how to do anything they cant already do

But I mean, come on. The school is about 90% guitar majors. That should tell you something right there.

EDIT: Fun fact about Julliard. They are not accredited by the national board of colleges. But hey, its Julliard. They dont need to be.


Im sorry, but if your goal is to be a working musician making a living with something you love, go to a real college and get a real degree
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Jan 13, 2010,
#21
Quote by tubatom868686


K dude. Go to berklee, and get your degree. There might be 3 or 4 big names you can list that made it out of berklee; but Id be interested to find out how many of their graduates ever find work

A lot of naive guitarists hold berklee on a pedestal because they think they think its a realistic way to get a degree in music, without having to learn how to do anything they cant already do

But I mean, come on. The school is about 90% guitar majors. That should tell you something right there.

EDIT: Fun fact about Julliard. They are not accredited by the national board of colleges. But hey, its Julliard. They dont need to be.


Im sorry, but if your goal is to be a working musician making a living with something you love, go to a real college and get a real degree


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Berklee_College_of_Music_alumni


Number of alumni Grammy Awards: 162
Percentage of Berklee graduates who work in the music industry: 80
Number of principal instruments: 29

You are full of shit and stuck up in the classical world.
12 fret fury
#22
If you want to become a professional musician, don't just go to a school with a great reputation and expect them to make you a superstar. Choose a city with thriving music scene, and get involved in that as much as possible while you're doing your diploma/degree. Music colleges are great places to learn about music, but above all they are fantastic places to meet other musicians.
#23
Quote by Punk Poser
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Berklee_College_of_Music_alumni


Number of alumni Grammy Awards: 162
Percentage of Berklee graduates who work in the music industry: 80
Number of principal instruments: 29

You are full of shit and stuck up in the classical world.




For starters "Members of this list have attended Berklee for at least one semester or summer program"

Second off, pretty much anyone can get a grammy. In fact, my high schools music dpt has 3 of them. Also, Id be curious as to what "Working in the music industry" means.

And last but not least, I am not stuck up. Im just trying to warn you all. Hey, no ones stopping you from going to berklee.
#24
Quote by tubatom868686
Im sorry dude, but berklee is sort of a joke.

If you want to major in guitar, the only respectable majors are classical or jazz.

Berklee is the only school that offers contemporary guitar, and its for a reason. Every real college knows that actually offering a major in contemporary guitar is ridiculous


How exactly does this make Berklee a joke? What's so ridiculous about majoring in guitar? Just because guitar has this stigma around it (anyone can play guitar, bla bla bla bla bla)

Also, what the **** do you mean by respectable? I'm sorry, but your throwing a lot of terms out there without backing anything you say up. Do you have any proof that a non-jazz major is any less respectable?

You can't just say it's a shitty school because they offer non-conventional courses. Honestly, I'm getting a lot of arrogance from you...."I'm a classically trained musician and I majored in Jazz, so I'm better than you."

K dude. Go to berklee, and get your degree. There might be 3 or 4 big names you can list that made it out of berklee; but Id be interested to find out how many of their graduates ever find work


You people are talking so much bullshit! Why should it even matter how many of the alumni became "succesful". Success is not the product of a college education, but hard work. If your going to a college thinking "I'm gonna get this degree and instantly become a huge star!" then you're a ****ing dumbass. First of all, how is one degree in music any different than another degree in music? Music is music, and you don't need a damn degree to be a succesful musician...nobody is interviewing you, nobody's looking at your credentials....and you sure as hell don't need the support of colleges and record companies to be succesful. The music business is one of the few where you can actually make it on your own. The problem is that people are too lazy to try to get their names out there...they've convinced themselves that if you don't have the support of record companies, then you might as well not 'waste' your time.

And last but not least, I am not stuck up. Im just trying to warn you all. Hey, no ones stopping you from going to berklee.


Warn us against WHAT? What's going to happen, are we going to burn in musical hell for attending a well-known college?
Last edited by JBender23 at Jan 14, 2010,
#25
Berklee has 56 guitar instructors, so even if it is"a joke", you'll be around a ton of guitar pros and other guitarists. Plus, Boston is close to New York, and both have an active music scene, and great guitarists/musicians.

The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music is in New York is modern if you like jazz, which I don't think you do.

If you're into rock, I think Musician's Institute might be for you. But don't quote me on-i haven't looked into it a much.
#26
If your goal is to say you went to a school that famous people went to, then yeah go to MI or Berklee.

If you just want a good education though, there are lots of other equally valid if not better options.

In Michigan...... U of M, WSU, Oakland

you could even get alot out of a place like Macomb Community College


Also, you should have the sense to consider that those famous players you mentioned have more than just the school they went to going for them. It would be foolish to think that just because you go to Berklee that you'll end up like Vai or Petrucci. It would also be foolish to think you couldn't be that good via any other path.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 14, 2010,
#27
What will he get from a college or university program that he won't get from private instruction at a fraction of the cost, that will help him with his goal, which is to play pop-based music?

His degree or diploma will NOT help him achieve that goal. Nobody in that world gives half a crap about that for the most part. They want to hear what you can do, and know you exist, and feel confident depending on your reputation.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#28
Quote by axemanchris
What will he get from a college or university program that he won't get from private instruction at a fraction of the cost, that will help him with his goal, which is to play pop-based music?



Depends on what he puts into it. Certainly, the experience would be beneficial.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 14, 2010,
#29
Quote by JBender23
How exactly does this make Berklee a joke? What's so ridiculous about majoring in guitar? Just because guitar has this stigma around it (anyone can play guitar, bla bla bla bla bla)

Also, what the **** do you mean by respectable? I'm sorry, but your throwing a lot of terms out there without backing anything you say up. Do you have any proof that a non-jazz major is any less respectable?

You can't just say it's a shitty school because they offer non-conventional courses. Honestly, I'm getting a lot of arrogance from you...."I'm a classically trained musician and I majored in Jazz, so I'm better than you."


You people are talking so much bullshit! Why should it even matter how many of the alumni became "succesful". Success is not the product of a college education, but hard work. If your going to a college thinking "I'm gonna get this degree and instantly become a huge star!" then you're a ****ing dumbass. First of all, how is one degree in music any different than another degree in music? Music is music, and you don't need a damn degree to be a succesful musician...nobody is interviewing you, nobody's looking at your credentials....and you sure as hell don't need the support of colleges and record companies to be succesful. The music business is one of the few where you can actually make it on your own. The problem is that people are too lazy to try to get their names out there...they've convinced themselves that if you don't have the support of record companies, then you might as well not 'waste' your time.


Warn us against WHAT? What's going to happen, are we going to burn in musical hell for attending a well-known college?


Majoring in contemporary guitar is ridiculous because there isnt that much to learn before you start getting into jazz and classical.

Second off, the amount of successful alumni as totally relevant. Its how you measure how well a college can teach a course. The reason so many people want to go to U of I for engineering school is because their engineers are so successful in the field. Thats just college 101 right there.

And you dont need a degree to do well in music. But your not going to college for a scrap of paper. The education you get in the process is whats important. In my eyes, Berklee is subpar (or at the very least, advertises itself as something its not)

Also, what do you mean no one looks at your credentials? Maybe not if your gonna be a rockstar. But if your a working musician (living off small well paying gigs), people are gonna wanna know where you went to school, what degree you majored in, where you did your grad studies, etc etc. For instance, if Im throwing together a brass quintet and I know nothing about 2 french horn players except the college they went to, and one of them went to Southern Illinois, and one went to Eastman, Im gonna hire the one that went to eastman.

Listen dude, go to Berklee if you want. No one is stopping you. Im just trying to keep you from wasting your money. Its obvious that you dont know anything about music schools though (berklee or otherwise), so I suggest you do some research before you plan on going to school for music

Oh, btw, whoever mentioned 56 guitar teachers, let me explain something about music schools to you. A teacher does not have to be full time to be listed as staff. In fact, usually, all they need is to have an office in the school. They may be at the school one day a month, and they can still say that teacher is "on staff."
#30
to respond the above post about degrees:
the school i go to (a small liberal arts college in new orleans with a decent and small jazz program) the guitar instructor did not go to college. he is a working musician known throughout the city and is currently on staff (3-4 days a week actually teaching) at my university.
bob moses (a professor at NEC, one of the better jazz and classical schools there are) did not go to college and IIRC did not attend high school.
and you'd be an idiot to put a group together based on where people go to school if you have not heard them or if someone you know and respect did not recommend them.

EDIT:
as far as berklee being subpar, if you are not a fairly developed player already and do not get noticed it is easy to fall to the back of the pack and not study with very good professors (specifically mediocre berklee grads from the 70's). If you get noticed and work hard, you can study with some of the best jazz or contemporary professors there are. A degree from berklee doesnt mean nearly as much as berklee says it does, but in music your playing is always more important than your degree. it is insanely expensive and huge (about 4000-5000 students IIRC, which is HUGE for a school of music) but you can also get excelent training and an accredited (though not by NASM) degree.
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Jan 15, 2010,
#31
Quote by tehREALcaptain

and you'd be an idiot to put a group together based on where people go to school if you have not heard them or if someone you know and respect did not recommend them.

EDIT:
as far as berklee being subpar, if you are not a fairly developed player already and do not get noticed it is easy to fall to the back of the pack and not study with very good professors (specifically mediocre berklee grads from the 70's). If you get noticed and work hard, you can study with some of the best jazz or contemporary professors there are. A degree from berklee doesnt mean nearly as much as berklee says it does, but in music your playing is always more important than your degree. it is insanely expensive and huge (about 4000-5000 students IIRC, which is HUGE for a school of music) but you can also get excelent training and an accredited (though not by NASM) degree.


For the first part, Im talking about finding subs on super short notice. Of course you wouldnt let someone join your group based on college alone.

Most of the EDIT is correct.