#1
I'm sorry, I did search it up, and I found dozens of threads talking about why anchoring is good or bad for you.

Now, I don't care if it's good or bad, I just want to know the definition. I've just started seriously playing guitar everyday, and I want my technique to be near perfect before I start nailing in practice. As far as I know, some people say anchoring is when you use any of your non picking fingers to sit on the body of the guitar with pressure, and you use it to like, balance your accuracy. Like, pushing down with your pinky on your guitar. Others said when any part of your arm/wrist/hand touches down on your guitar.

Now this is what I"m doing. Right now, I don't anchor with any of my fingers, but the side of my hand (Not the palm, kinda like I karate chopped the bridge) is resting on the bridge, and just naturally, my elbow rests on the top of the body of the guitar.

Ok, now when I pick, my hand like, swivels up and down. My whole arm does not move, just from my wrist up. I don't put any pressure on the bridge really, it's just naturally resting there. I read earlier that based on some peoples definition, you should be relaxed, but no part of your arm should touch down on the guitar. I tried playing without my right arm/wrist not touching down at all, and it was anything but nice and relaxed.

So I was wondering...Is picking with your wrist considered anchoring? Should I be moving my whole fore arm, using the elbow's pivot to pick not the wrist? And should i not be touching down on the guitar at all anywhere to avoid the definition of anchoring? Because honestly, when sitting down, it's like, 3x more uncomfortable then when my arm rests on the guitar. In fact, I'm using other muscles to keep my arm afloat. So yeah, basically, what really fits the definition of anchoring?

Edit : My style would be something like this, but a LITTLE less fluid.

Nevermind I'll find a different movie.
Last edited by Goliath797 at Jan 7, 2010,
#2
anchoring refers to resting your picking arm on the body of the guitar instead of "hovering" it. whichever feels more natural and makes you sound good is the right one, in my opinion.
Audio Ecstasy Productions!

Guitar/Backline Tech in the Los Angeles area and on tour!
Custom guitar pedals and cabling for stage and studio!

I set up DAWs and tweak computers to record audio. Hit me up @ audioecstasyproductions[at}gmail.com
#3
From what I can tell, and what I do, is I put my forearm on the top of the guitar, but no part of my fingers or hand touch the guitar when I'm picking unless it's palm muting.

Also, I've found it to be waaaaay more precise when you pick using the index and thumb than the wrist, I've never seen any decent guitarist pick from the wrist unless it was a tremolo picking section.

But on a by-the-book definition, you are anchoring in the extreme, which could be very very very bad. Having the forearm on the top of the guitar is ok, atleast when sitting down, but keeping your hand on the bridge like that is sehr sehr schlect.
Last edited by CaptinSpalldin at Jan 7, 2010,
#4
Watch Paul Gilbert videos for non-anchoring.
Watch David Gilmour videos for anchoring.

Anchoring is resting ANY part of your arm used as an "anchor."
That's what I call anchoring.
#6
Yeah, mine looks more like Paul Gilbert. My arm rests on the guitar body, and my hand is like, on the bridge.

But honestly, that looks like the opposite. David Gilmour looks like his hand was more free, and Paul Gilbert looks like his hand is anchored.

I'm so confused now. And sorry about the wrong section, I looked through all of them to see if there was a more direct one to post in, and I guess I skimmed too fast.
#7
Quote by CaptinSpalldin
From what I can tell, and what I do, is I put my forearm on the top of the guitar, but no part of my fingers or hand touch the guitar when I'm picking unless it's palm muting.

Also, I've found it to be waaaaay more precise when you pick using the index and thumb than the wrist, I've never seen any decent guitarist pick from the wrist unless it was a tremolo picking section.

But on a by-the-book definition, you are anchoring in the extreme, which could be very very very bad. Having the forearm on the top of the guitar is ok, atleast when sitting down, but keeping your hand on the bridge like that is sehr sehr schlect.


paul waggoner picks from the wrist. and i'm assuming you've seen him play. as well as damn near every guitarist on earth thats any good picks from the wrist. circle picking is actually an oddity amongst almost all guitar players. that doesnt mean they dont use their fingers at all, its just the wrist is in motion almost the entire time.
#8
Oh yeah, made a mistake there, I only use my wrist in tremelo picking and sweeping, but what I mean by not use the wrist, is that the wrist is what puts the pick in place, but the actual force is exerted by my fingers, not the wrist.

I'm pretty sure Paul does it that way too, I need to check that though.....

EDIT: Seems you're right about Paul, but it doesn't mean much to me, I'm not trying to emulate him or anything

Again, my wrist moves, but its not what makes the pick hit the string, if you get what I'm saying
Last edited by CaptinSpalldin at Jan 7, 2010,
#9
Quote by CaptinSpalldin
Oh yeah, made a mistake there, I only use my wrist in tremelo picking and sweeping, but what I mean by not use the wrist, is that the wrist is what puts the pick in place, but the actual force is exerted by my fingers, not the wrist.

I'm pretty sure Paul does it that way too, I need to check that though.....


its both, and i bet if i saw a video of you i would see both being used as well.
#10
By jove, you're right, sorry for the retarded posts haha, I remember only being able to use my fingers exclusively when I was anchoring my pinky, but now that I've stopped thaT I just noticed I'm using my wrist, again, sorry for the wrongness haha.
#11
Sorry for a misleading post, but turns out now that I think about it, and I actually try picking using my wrist, theres a large difference between using my wrist to exert the force and my fingers. It's my fingers exerting the force, but my wrist just kinda moves along with it because it kind of has to.

So yeah, I feel kinda safe. I don't really take a side in whether or not anchoring is dangerous or not, but I just want to avoid it just in case :P.
#12
It depends. I hardly notice because I just get so into playing, but I usually mix it up between anchoring and letting my hand float freely.

It's whatever works, man. There is no wrong way to comfortably play guitar.

Hell, Paul Gilbert thought you were only supposed to play with upstrokes when he first started out. He got comfortable with it, and now look at him. He's got the most badass alternate picking skills I've ever seen.