#1
Hey guys, lately I've been recording with the good old fashioned rock band microphone into usb and audacity set up. While it's quite terrible, it made me realized that I do have a lot of interest in recording. In general, I play to a click track in Audacity and then record track-by-track whatever I want, but it get's frustrating as there is so much lag between when I play and when it's recorded I don't have the opportunity to listen to the things I've recorded while I play.

Building off this, I'm also really looking to expand my recording abilities. I would like the ability to record more than one thing at a time (such as guitar and singing, or a couple people playing). I want something where I'll be able to record onto the computer and then record over what I just did while being able to hear it without lag. I'm also looking to maybe at least try a program a little more high-tech than Audacity.

I've been browsing around and I came across these bundles:
1. http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Digidesign-Pro-Tools-Mbox-Mini-Package?sku=702525

2. http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Digidesign-Mbox-2-Factory-Studio-Bundle?sku=583511

I would probably buy a Shure SM57 in addition to these just for another mic. Basically what it comes down to is, will these be worthwhile buys for me? Will it be easy enough to learn, being able to get a halfway decent sounding recording without spending hours learning ProTools, but still have the capability to get more involved if I want?

I realize I'm not going to have a professional sounding recording, but I do want to try my hand at getting some of my stuff down. I'm really looking to be able to play without lag, and also multitrack. Which of these bundles is better, or if neither of them are recommended, what can you point me towards?

Also, I don't know if this matters much, but I already have a PA system with a decent mixer.
All of our days are numbered
I’ve taken some comfort
In knowing the wave has crested
Knowing I don’t have to be an exception
#2
When recording the most important thing ain't the microphone.

Alot of this is done by the computer, your amp, your guitar skill etc...

If you got for all of this decent stuff than you can think of a nice microphone.

Check your sound card on computer, it's one of the most important part in all this...

Hope that help i ain't professional in recording...

-MDP

Edit: I'll also recommend speed up your comp if you got some lag with audacity...
#4
if you go with a pack, get the higher price one. the monitors are better quality and greater response, the mic is better, and the interface is more flexible.
#5
Yeah, if you can afford the larger package, go for it. That's a great start in recording, and as long as your computer can handle it, you won't need to upgrade for a good while.

The reason you're experiencing lag with audacity is your lack of interface, most likely. What are your PC specs?

Also, your sound card is completely irrelevant. An interface bypasses the sound card, so you don't need to give that a second thought!
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#6
Quote by Sid McCall
Yeah, if you can afford the larger package, go for it. That's a great start in recording, and as long as your computer can handle it, you won't need to upgrade for a good while.

The reason you're experiencing lag with audacity is your lack of interface, most likely. What are your PC specs?

Also, your sound card is completely irrelevant. An interface bypasses the sound card, so you don't need to give that a second thought!


Thanks everyone, I have a fairly powerful PC (8 gigs ram, great processor, etc.) so I'm about 99% sure that the lag comes from the lack of interface like you said.

I can definitely afford the larger package, I just want to make sure that it's going to be able to do what I want and that it isn't going to be impossible to learn. I'm more interested in recording and trying to produce immense sounds and learning mic placement and whatnot than sitting in front of a computer trying to learn a program.
All of our days are numbered
I’ve taken some comfort
In knowing the wave has crested
Knowing I don’t have to be an exception
#7
ProTools is easier than people say it is. I used to think it was tough, then I started learning Ableton Live and I felt like I was hit by a truck. ProTools is a breeze, especially to do simple things. You still need to LEARN a bunch of stuff about recording, and you won't get all of it from a manual, but it's not rocket science. That's a great starter package, I say go for it.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#8
As one who is using the same setup minus the mic (They didn't have the nice bundle when I bought mine :P), go for it.

Pro Tools has been a solid investment and the monitors are great sounding. Also, either get a SM57 or a Sennheiser e609 if you plan on micing a Guitar cab.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#9
Reaper and Mixcraft are powerful programs that is both cheap and easy to learn.

An interface will also add a bit to the quality.

Presonus Audiobox will get you started (150$)
and maybe one or two condensers, don't ask me about what mic, but the Audiobox may handle them and that thing is ****ing solid, saw a youtube video of one kicking it around and running over it with a full-size truck and recorded a song on it afterwards.

What do you think you can spend? 2 tracks is enough as long as you're not going to record a full drum kit.
#10
Quote by GisleAune
Reaper and Mixcraft are powerful programs that is both cheap and easy to learn.

An interface will also add a bit to the quality.

Presonus Audiobox will get you started (150$)
and maybe one or two condensers, don't ask me about what mic, but the Audiobox may handle them and that thing is ****ing solid, saw a youtube video of one kicking it around and running over it with a full-size truck and recorded a song on it afterwards.

What do you think you can spend? 2 tracks is enough as long as you're not going to record a full drum kit.


I wouldn't really want to spend more then $500-600. I could, but I don't want to spend all my money on just recording equipment. Also, if I wanted to mic drums, couldn't I technically run a few mics into my PA mixer and then use the output from that to run into the interface? I realize I won't have each drum sound as a different track then, but it would still work better than nothing, yes? Or am I completely wrong.

Edit: I believe this is the mixer I have: http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Behringer-EUROPOWER-PMP2000-800Watt-10Channel-Powered-Mixer?sku=630182
All of our days are numbered
I’ve taken some comfort
In knowing the wave has crested
Knowing I don’t have to be an exception
Last edited by InfiniteRain at Jan 8, 2010,
#11
Quote by InfiniteRain
I wouldn't really want to spend more then $500-600. I could, but I don't want to spend all my money on just recording equipment. Also, if I wanted to mic drums, couldn't I technically run a few mics into my PA mixer and then use the output from that to run into the interface? I realize I won't have each drum sound as a different track then, but it would still work better than nothing, yes? Or am I completely wrong.

Edit: I believe this is the mixer I have: http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Behringer-EUROPOWER-PMP2000-800Watt-10Channel-Powered-Mixer?sku=630182


Doing that will work but you've gotta do all the mixing for drums before you record. This can be a pain if in the middle of mixing you come to the conclusion that you need more cowbell or something drum related.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#12
Quote by lockwolf
Doing that will work but you've gotta do all the mixing for drums before you record. This can be a pain if in the middle of mixing you come to the conclusion that you need more cowbell or something drum related.


Alright thanks. I think for now it will hopefully work ok. While I am expecting to try and learn to record better, I'm not 1. Instantly expecting studio quality (or really ever, with my budget ), and 2. Also looking as recording as a way to explore some of the musical ideas in my head.
All of our days are numbered
I’ve taken some comfort
In knowing the wave has crested
Knowing I don’t have to be an exception
#13
Quote by InfiniteRain
2. Also looking as recording as a way to explore some of the musical ideas in my head.


You're gonna love Pro Tools then. I don't know how many times I've sent up a looping synth and plugged my guitar and just played over the top of it. I've walked away in the end so many times after playing for like an hour and realize that 1, its a loop and 2, nothing actually got recorded :p
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#14
Quote by lockwolf
You're gonna love Pro Tools then. I don't know how many times I've sent up a looping synth and plugged my guitar and just played over the top of it. I've walked away in the end so many times after playing for like an hour and realize that 1, its a loop and 2, nothing actually got recorded :p

Then you should try Ableton! That's how I write all of my songs, except my guitar actually gets recorded, then I add more stuff all around the loops and end up with a finished song after a few hours.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#16
i use Cubase LE4 with Audio Kontrol recording Interface...It was going well until I had "Latency Output" issues. So I gave up recording for a while, almost a year i'd say. I recently decided to reinstall everything and give it another shot. If I could remember, my latency output was too high so whenever I played a note on my guitar, the note would be played about a second later in a delay sort of fashion.