#1
So I want to get a job at a guitar store, but I dont know much about guitar...despite having played for over 3 years. What I know alot about are pedals, but amps and guitars I dont really know much about. I have 2 electrics, but they are not popular named brands.

So...

what are popular brands of guitars? Are there any websites I could learn about types of guitars and what pick-ups are and stuff?
Quote by thankyougermany
I'm not in there
#2
Really? Okay...well brands to check out are:

Fender
Gibson
Epiphone
Ibanez
Jackson
Schecter
ESP
Paul Reed Smith
Dean

Google them and you won't have any problems finding their websites.
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
Gibson Faded V
Warmoth Strat copy
Epiphone Hummingbird (FS!!)
Ibanez SR400QM
Fender BXR100
Reggae Bass Covers mahn!!!

#3
get acquainted with the brands the store you want to work at has. most smaller stores don't really stock very many, so it shouldn't be so hard.

popular guitar brands: fender, gibson, epiphone, ibanez, jackson, schecter, etc.
#4
And heres another question:

The 3 line things on the body of my guitar are called pick-ups right? The switch on my guitar has 5 positions (one is an off position), so there are 4 others. But only 3 pick-ups?
Quote by thankyougermany
I'm not in there
#5
to answer your question about your guitar, most 3 pickup guitars have a 5 way switch that has 5 completely different positions, no off spot. so your guitar is a little bit unusual. i can tell from your question that you asked that you'll have a ton more to ask before you'd be able to really give people information about their own guitars (no offense. really!).

i learned most of what i know about guitars by hanging out with people who knew more than i did. everybody has to learn sometime, so while reading a book that lays out the different parts of a guitar is a good idea, it's definitely helpful to just be around people who will teach you things. find a friend that plays guitar and go to guitar center and listen to what they have to say. hopefully they will really know what they're talking about and not just spewing a bunch of nonsense and biased information around haha
Warmoth Telecaster Deluxe. Warmoth Strat. Seagull Artist Portrait Acoustic.

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#6
I'd thought about applying for a job at a few different guitar shops. It seems like it would be a cool job and all that.

As it turns out though, most guitar shops don't want the kind of employees you'd expect. Instead of someone who can walk you around the store and explain the differences between various pieces of equipment, pointing out pros and cons, they want guys who know jack about everything. All you need to be able to do is misinform and lay down a tasty lick or two.
Quote by Marty Friedman
Because I bend in such an unorthodox fashion; the notes kinda slide up and slide down...
#7
To work in a music store, you're going to have to be able to sell the products. If you don't know how to operate, and explain the features on an amp, guitar, effects unit, etc., no one is going to hire you as a salesman.
Knowing how to do simple repairs such as setups, pickup installation, replacing volume and tone pots, etc., is another valuable skill, that the manager might look for.

Some stores might hire a "gopher", someone to take out the trash, run the vacuum, wipe down the counters, polish guitars. This might not sound overly glamorous, but everyone has to start somewhere. You can gain product knowledge and learn how to sell. Plus most stores give their employees discounts.

I've been working in music stores for 20 years. It's not as much fun as you might think. I'm currently a teacher and have been for most of those 20 years. But I've done my share of sales. And I can't think of many things in life that I hated more than being a salesman. The majority of the people that come in, just want to check out the latest gear. Because guess what, most musicians don't have any money. So they'll waste your time, by asking you a million questions, trying out every piece of gear in the store, wearing out the strings and getting fingerprints all over the guitars. Meanwhile, you're trying to sell them something because if you want to make decent money, your sales depend on it. All the while you have to listen to horrible versions of Iron Man, Enter Sandman, and Smoke on the Water. The basic rule for guys who play in music stores is this: The louder they play, the worse they play.
It's not all bad. There are people who buy stuff. And you will on rare occasion find someone who can play really well. But it's probably less than 10% of the time.
This is why I teach instead of work on the sales floor.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#8
Quote by ch0
I'd thought about applying for a job at a few different guitar shops. It seems like it would be a cool job and all that.

As it turns out though, most guitar shops don't want the kind of employees you'd expect. Instead of someone who can walk you around the store and explain the differences between various pieces of equipment, pointing out pros and cons, they want guys who know jack about everything. All you need to be able to do is misinform and lay down a tasty lick or two.


Mostly false statements.
I work in a music store; and there is no chance I can sell a piano, even though I can play some. We have another guy there for that. Point being, you do have to know about the stuff you're selling.

You do need to know about the pro's and cons. Although, the trick to selling is to avoid the cons and emphasise the pros of a product.

I sell tons of spider III 30's. They're in my opinion a poop amp. Why do they still sell?

Because i advertise them for having a lot of handy features. CD/Mp3 input for playalong(this is a great one), Built in-effects, 4 "modes", or the "Clean, grunge, metal and insane", and mostly because it's something that's easier to sell to a beginner, which are usually kids, their parents/wallet is thrilled to hear about the headphone output. And because I don't rely my advertising on the sound quality, I avoid the cons. Do I misinform? No. If they do ask about the sound quality and my personal opinion about it, I'll spill the guts no problem. The point is, don't emphasize it. Call it a cheap trick, but it's not lying, and they are free to try before they buy after my demonstration anyway.


You do need to know the products thoroughly. And you do need to know some tasty licks. And you need to avoid misinforming, or it will get you into some serious trouble. if you have to lie to sell something, you're a bad salesman.


For TS:
If you can start out as a gopher, suck up as much knowledge as you can, and start pushing some smaller sales here and there, and you'll get into the game quickly.

a site you should check out is stewmac.com. they have some lessons and articles on amongst other things guitar electronics and mechanics, proper string changing(you'll do this a LOT), and other "must-knows".
#9
Ya, this really isnt a big music store. I know the guy that runs it - not very well - but I go in often, and he recognizes me. But ya, he pretty much knows nothing about guitars himself. I asked him how long he had been playing and he said something like "meh, since I was a kid, but you know...its not my life...its just...I just run the store, you know?" lol. So ya...I dont think its all about selling and stuff. More about scheduling the appointments since I get the feeling that is where 90% of his income comes from and such.
Quote by thankyougermany
I'm not in there
#10
I'm gonna do the same in a few weeks gonna go to local guitar store i normally go to

they seem to recognize me anyway so hopefully i'll put on a nice shirt and pants and maybe a tie and hand in my resume and have a talk to them about what i want which is only really a part time job i odn't know much but i do know stuff about prices and what is decent etc, only been playing a year but i really enjoy guitars and the different stuff about them
#11
Quote by BoL7z
I'm gonna do the same in a few weeks gonna go to local guitar store i normally go to

they seem to recognize me anyway so hopefully i'll put on a nice shirt and pants and maybe a tie and hand in my resume and have a talk to them about what i want which is only really a part time job i odn't know much but i do know stuff about prices and what is decent etc, only been playing a year but i really enjoy guitars and the different stuff about them
Youre an idiot. I was just saying its not about getting a SALE for him like it is a big music stores where they get paid on commission.
Quote by thankyougermany
I'm not in there
#12
Quote by seth's daddy
.

Some stores might hire a "gopher", someone to take out the trash, run the vacuum, wipe down the counters, polish guitars. This might not sound overly glamorous, but everyone has to start somewhere. You can gain product knowledge and learn how to sell. Plus most stores give their employees discounts.


Do this. Try and get an internship or something where you don't do much of the salesman stuff but more of that and changing strings (NO Floyd Rose yet, only hard-tails). Seriously, it's a great way to start. You get paid, get discounts on strings, polish and shit AND you pick up a lot of good tips from the more experienced players at the store.
Well at least it worked for me.
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#13
If you have to ask all that, you're probably looking to be working in the wrong job. :/

I found out most of what I know about guitars by chatting to shop workers/owners (even if most of the time i disagree with them, bar a few good exceptions), talking to other guitarists, lurking UG, reading brand's websites and catalogues, and experience of my own. It's not complicated.