#1
What essentially is the difference between a song in the Ionian mode, and a song in the regular major scale? The same could go for minor and aeolian, I guess.
Rubys.
We could change the world if we had the source code.
#3
It doesn't necessarily need to be a lengthy vamp, but it should be the "I chord", and tunes using Ionian will stay clear of other Diatonically connected chords.

Try this:

||: Dmaj9 | Dmaj9 | Ebmaj9 | Ebmaj7 :|| Make sure you repeat it!!!! You have to hear it resolve.

You would use D Ionian and Eb Lydian. You will see when you reach the end of playing this progression over and over that Dmaj9 is the home, or resolving, chord. And you'll see that D Ionian is the base scale for it.

Many modal tunes have chords that are not only disparate from a common Key but also lack a series of chords with in each chords mode.
#4
Quote by MikeDodge
It doesn't necessarily need to be a lengthy vamp, but it should be the "I chord", and tunes using Ionian will stay clear of other Diatonically connected chords.

Try this:

||: Dmaj9 | Dmaj9 | Ebmaj9 | Ebmaj7 :|| Make sure you repeat it!!!! You have to hear it resolve.

You would use D Ionian and Eb Lydian. You will see when you reach the end of playing this progression over and over that Dmaj9 is the home, or resolving, chord. And you'll see that D Ionian is the base scale for it.

Many modal tunes have chords that are not only disparate from a common Key but also lack a series of chords with in each chords mode.
I have no idea what you are trying to say. The notes in that are C# D Eb E F F# G A Bb.

I'm pretty sure nonatonic modes don't exist, thus ruling out the possibility that that is modal.

Quote by Myshadow46_2
Ionian would be used in a strictly modal setting e.g. over a Vamp, or a pedal tone.
This. There's a distinct difference between modal music. Read through the modes sticky and it should start to make some sense to you.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jan 8, 2010,
#5
As I said here: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showpost.php?p=22872972&postcount=11 modal music is an entirely different system to diatonic music. The ionian mode and the major scale may have the same notes technically, but they're used entirely different.
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#6
I don't think there are any valid differences between Ionian and Major (or aeolian and minor) that have useful impact on playing them.

A lot of people say 'Ionian should just use the I' or sometimes 'you can't use accidentals in ionian' but these things don't really hold any water in my opinion.

Personally, i don't think you need to manage Ionian any differently from Major, so long as the tonal centre is at the 'I' surely either way of thinking is valid.
I mean, where would you draw the line? Gmaj vamp = modal, but then what if you add in a D7? Do we suddenly tell the composer 'i'm very sorry, but that is not modal any more'.

I remain unconvinced of any useful difference.


ed- just read Demons post link, yes i agree with all the statements in there, although still standing by what i wrote here. If that makes sense.
Last edited by branny1982 at Jan 9, 2010,
#7
In some sense, like branny said, there is no difference whatsoever -- it's simply a matter of reference.

However, to say it's in Ionian, I think, would imply modality, and that's where demonofthenight's response comes in.