#1
Hi,

For a few weeks I've been planning on putting some crazy LED's inside my old strat copy but I dont really fancy taking my whole guitar apart when I want to replace a dead battery. So I came up with this idea to replace the mono jack in my guitar with a stereo one and then use the left channel to power the LED's and the right one to go to the amp. I drew up a little diagram so you all know what I'm talking about:



So, would this work or am I missing something?

Thanks,
Kacper
#2
i think you're going about this all wrong. brb with a pic.



You have to have a current limiting resistor to keep the LEDs from burning out. LEDs can safely operate with no resistor only up to 3v. anything higher requires a resistor.

you say you dont want to take the guitar apart to replace a battery, but where are you going to put the one in your diagram?

If i'm reading your diagram correctly, you want to use a stereo jack's ring connection to supply +9v between the ring and ground. this wont work because then you'll ground the +9v when you plug in a mono plug. if you use a stereo plug, you risk damaging whatever amp you plug into. or best case scenario, grounding the +9v at the amp instead of at the guitar output jack.

my advice is follow this diagram and put the battery in your trem claw cavity.
#3
Ok, so my idea has no way of working? I'd put the battery beside the amp or something btw. I know all the resistor stuff and im aware of that. So I just opened up the thing at the back with the springs and there's no way a battery would fit in there lol.

I'm just annoyed that you said it wouldnt work since I was sure it would as I've always been told in school that the negative side is just to let electrons flow back to earth so there wouldnt be anything wrong with my circuit as long as the left and right positive cables dont touch together which they wont.
#4
electricity flows from negatve to positive btw

sorry, but it just won't work. the tip connection carries the output of the guitar. the ring connection would get grounded if you plugged in a mono cable or plugged a stereo cable into any amp.
#5
For some reason I just dont get how this wouldn't work, if you have the paitience could you explain exactly what is wrong with this? And whats a ring btw?

#6
a split cable like that could possibly work.

but honestly, it would be way easier to just stick the battery in the guitar. if you have a back cavity for a trem, it might fit in there. if it doesnt, cut a section of the pick guard off from the main part.. that way you only have to remove that little section of the guard to change the battery, not the whole thing.

i mean it is an interesting idea in concept, but it isnt really the best way to go about it.
#7
The grounds are the same though. You're going to have to ground the battery to the same ground signal thats going to your amp. Your example above, you have the lines sort of wrong because they share the same ground. Tip, ring and sleeve are only 3 possible connections for a stereo plug, but in reality you need 4. Amp signal and ground, plus battery + and -. You don't want to ground the battery to the same ground going to amp. If you want to replace your input jack with a 8pin midi cable or something and then make a breakout box, that would work, but in reality, put a battery in your pickguard and call it a day. For a few LED's a 9V battery will last a long time before you have to change it.
Lefty Strat Copy w/ GFS Lil' killer rails + Crazy wiring
Lefty Kona Thinline Acoustic/Electric
Righty-to-Lefty Silvertone Bass
Righty-to-Lefty Memphis Short Scale Bass
Vox AD30VT-XL

Tascam US-428 USB Interface Mixer
Guitar Rig 3
Last edited by GeToChKn at Jan 8, 2010,
#8
grounding the battery and the amp will work just fine. what do you think they do in pedals? they put the battery ground to the ring of a stereo input jack. plug in a mono plug and it shorts the ring and sleeve together to turn the battery on. the sleeve of the pedal is connected thru the cable to the amp's ground, which is in turn grounded via your house's neutral wire (which is connected to the actual ground (i.e. the planet earth) inside your breaker panel).
#9
Quote by Invader Jim
electricity flows from negatve to positive btw

sorry, but it just won't work. the tip connection carries the output of the guitar. the ring connection would get grounded if you plugged in a mono cable or plugged a stereo cable into any amp.

There is actually a second way/analogy, there is more than one way electricity flow can be thought of
#10
Quote by Invader Jim
grounding the battery and the amp will work just fine. what do you think they do in pedals? they put the battery ground to the ring of a stereo input jack. plug in a mono plug and it shorts the ring and sleeve together to turn the battery on. the sleeve of the pedal is connected thru the cable to the amp's ground, which is in turn grounded via your house's neutral wire (which is connected to the actual ground (i.e. the planet earth) inside your breaker panel).


I stand mistaken then. Still seems like a bad idea and over complicated to avoid changing a battery every once in a while.
Lefty Strat Copy w/ GFS Lil' killer rails + Crazy wiring
Lefty Kona Thinline Acoustic/Electric
Righty-to-Lefty Silvertone Bass
Righty-to-Lefty Memphis Short Scale Bass
Vox AD30VT-XL

Tascam US-428 USB Interface Mixer
Guitar Rig 3
Last edited by GeToChKn at Jan 8, 2010,
#11
really? my reasoning was because electrons are always seeking their positive ions. what's the other analogy? my college instructor would love to hear about it.

edit: yeah this whole thing is just a bad idea in general imho. way over complicated just to keep from changing a battery.
#12
electrons flow from negative to positive, so electricity actually flows from the - to the +. you could look at it as the movement of holes, but they dont actually move per-se.

this sums it up pretty much perfectly (thanks XKCD):

#13
ive read about the hole movement thing. got some Navy electronics training material from my cousin and they go into retarded amounts of detail. they also say that the initial impulse of electricity is the speed of light but then it instantly slows to an inch every hour or smt. i have a hard time beliving that though.

well im done spamming this thread