#1
Hi, friend is really into this guitar, fender jag Fender Products: Classic Player Jaguar® Special HH , he plays alot of clean stuff but also gets into some distortiony type of stuff, not a metal fan, anyway, with the pickups, it says it has a humbucker/single coild blend switch. does that mean he would be able to switch the pickups between single coil and humbucker? coz he really likes the single coil clean sound but wants a humbucker for some rock stuff. so is that what the "blend" control does?

thanks
Gear List:
Guitars:
Schecter C7 Hellraiser
Jackson JS20 Dinky
Ibanez MTM1 (Slipknot Signature)
Amps:
Peavey 6505+ Head (with Grill Mod)
Cab and Effects:
Orange PPC412(BLK)
Boss NS-2 Noise Supressor
#2
Hey Jamesy.
Yeah its a great system , not 100% sure about the Classic Player Jaguar® Special HH , but with some Ibanez guitars i believe its the same system where you can mix and match whether you want to use single coil and bridge and humbucker at the neck.
Single coil and bridge and neck etc etc.
So yeah , would be very versatile from what i can see
#4
thanks alot man
Gear List:
Guitars:
Schecter C7 Hellraiser
Jackson JS20 Dinky
Ibanez MTM1 (Slipknot Signature)
Amps:
Peavey 6505+ Head (with Grill Mod)
Cab and Effects:
Orange PPC412(BLK)
Boss NS-2 Noise Supressor
#5
EDIT: Whoa, didn't mean to go on for so long. Well, I'l leave the info there for refernce, but basically short version: it's really not worth bothering with, it's harder to use and gives you less useful tones. Fender Jaguar Special HH would be a better choice, or even a normal SS Classic Player Jag would be an improvement.




It's actually not a particularly useful control layout. Basically, on a normal Jaguar you have a rhythm and lead circuit. The rhythm circuit contains the neck pickup with a volume and tone control - just like using the neck pickup selection on any other guitar. The 'lead' circuit has a volume and tone control, a cut/filter switch (on most Jag models this gives an optional brighter tone; on some models though it's used to effect bass instead and on others it's made to effect the middle frequencies) and separate controls to turn each pickup on or off. So you can set up your tones before hand using every combination of pickups, brighter/thicker tones and either rhythm or lead circuits, and then during a performance switch directly between them without having to constantly re-adjust the volume and tone controls. You get everything from the absolute thickest neck tones (the volume and tone controls for the neck pickup on the rhythm circuit are 50k - most single coils use 250k pots and most humbuckers uses 500k pots. The 50k pots the Jaguar has give a much smoother tone than anything else you'll ever be able to buy off the shelf) up to the absolute brightest bridge tones (the volume and tone controls for the lead circuit are 1meg pots, which barely take off any treble at all - and then there's the treble filter switch on top).

With the Classic Player HH, the first set of volume and tone controls (for the rhythm circuit - neck pickup) are replaced with variable coil splits. These sound good in theory - giving you single coil, humbucker and every combination in-between - but in practise they only do two sounds. Because of the way humbuckers work, so long as one of the coils is even at just 1% volume, it's always going to sound pretty much the same. It's not like the old PAF pickups where you got more 'bite' out of a pickup if one coil was hotter than the other, in the case of a variable coil split all you can get out of it are the same two tones only it takes longer to switch between them than it would with a normal on-on coil split switch.
On top of that, the rhythm/lead selector switch is turned into a killswitch. Great if you want to spend your time in a Buckethead tribute act but of little use otherwise.

These two things combined mean you actually have a much harder time using the guitar. You can't easily switch between pickups - with a normal Jag you've got the neck pickup always on on the rhythm circuit and any combination you like on the lead circuit. With the Classic Player HH you don't have that rhythm circuit to switch back to, you're perminantly stuck on the lead circuit which means if you want to change from neck pickup to bridge pickup, you've got to flick two switches instead of one which does get annoying very quickly. The coil split, as I previously said, is rather pointless as it takes longer than if it was a normal direct on/on switch or a push-pull pot controlling them and the 'in-between' tones don't actually exist when you do the split with those sorts of controls (you can get them if you used indented pots, but you'd have to fit those yourself and would require completely re-wiring the whole guitar, something you could more cheaply do to any other Jaguar model). THe killswitch is something that sounds nice in theory but in practise I'm willing to bet it won't get much use and it's not really worth losing your pickup selector switch over.



Long story short, the Classic Player HH Jag system is more complicated to use than the normal Jag system and it gives you no extra tone options - a regular Jag can do everything from smooth neck to almost Telecaster-like bright bridge tones plus everything in-between while the CS HH Jag can do very bright humbucker tones and very bright fake-singlecoil tones, that's it.

Not to mention, the Jaguar (and Jazzmaster) bridge vibrato is a bit odd to use. It can actually be much better than a typical Strat vibrato but if you don't know how to use it properly and if you don't know how to set it up properly then it is utterly awful and a complete nightmare to have. If you're not already familiar with Jaguar guitars, this cane become a huge problem.

Fender make a Jaguar Special HH as well - tradtional (better) Jaguar wiring, two mid-output humbuckers (more mellow than the ones found in the CP Jag) and a Gibson-style fixed bridge. It's made in Japan - same as the CP Jag - and for nine out of ten people will be a far more appropriate choice.
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Last edited by MrFlibble at Jan 8, 2010,
#6
Quote by MrFlibble
EDIT: Whoa, didn't mean to go on for so long. Well, I'l leave the info there for refernce, but basically short version: it's really not worth bothering with, it's harder to use and gives you less useful tones. Fender Jaguar Special HH would be a better choice, or even a normal SS Classic Player Jag would be an improvement.

*Essay*

Fender make a Jaguar Special HH as well - tradtional (better) Jaguar wiring, two mid-output humbuckers (more mellow than the ones found in the CP Jag) and a Gibson-style fixed bridge. It's made in Japan - same as the CP Jag - and for nine out of ten people will be a far more appropriate choice.
Agreed!




#7
Quote by MrFlibble

It's made in Japan - same as the CP Jag - and for nine out of ten people will be a far more appropriate choice.


Actually the Classic Player Jags are made in Mexico