#1
So, I started learning this song "Break" by Three Days Grace last night. It is the first song I have ever played in drop D, everything else has been standard. Anyway, most of the sing is simply barring the low E, A and D strings, playing a chord. Is this not the exact same thing as playing a power chord in standard? (example, F is 1-3-3 in standard, would this be 3-3-3 in Drop D?) It's easier to play if this is the case, but is that really the whole reason bands use drop D, for simplicity?

Another example, is another part of the song is power chord on the third fret of A, fifth fret D and G. I have seen other tabs which say to play this 10-10-10 on E, A, D. Again... Same thing but a different way to do it?
#3
I don't really understand the question you are asking.

Yes, you're are doing Drop D chords right. Yeah, most bands use it for that simplicity.
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#5
Quote by potatohead_33
So, I started learning this song "Break" by Three Days Grace last night. It is the first song I have ever played in drop D, everything else has been standard. Anyway, most of the sing is simply barring the low E, A and D strings, playing a chord. Is this not the exact same thing as playing a power chord in standard? (example, F is 1-3-3 in standard, would this be 3-3-3 in Drop D?) It's easier to play if this is the case, but is that really the whole reason bands use drop D, for simplicity?

Another example, is another part of the song is power chord on the third fret of A, fifth fret D and G. I have seen other tabs which say to play this 10-10-10 on E, A, D. Again... Same thing but a different way to do it?



Indeed a lot of bands use it for simplicity, mainly for the guitarplayers.
by barring it, you have your pinky or other fingers available to add some higher
notes as well,
Like this
----------------
----------------
----------------
4474-2242--
4444-2222
4444-2222-
the guy in Billy talent uses this frequently.
But it makes you write in a different way, at least it does that for me.

and indeed playing
--------
------
------
10---
10---
10---
is the same as
------
-----
5----
5-----
3-----
------

The fifth fret of each string is the same as the string above it open, except for the G string, there it's the Fourth fret.
Last edited by Freth at Jan 8, 2010,
#6
Ian D'sa from Billy Talent does indeed play in drop D for everything. He says it's so he can play both a 'rhythm' cord and make some interesting other chord shapes for the lead 'fill' parts.
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#7
Aswell as simplicity it helps when using a 3-string D chord as an anchor.
e.g.


D|-0-0-7--0-0-7--0-7--5-5-7--3-3-7--3-3---------------------------------------------|
A|-0-0-7--0-0-7--0-7--5-5-7--3-3-7--3-3---------------------------------------------|
D|-0-0-7--0-0-7--0-7--5-5-7--3-3-7--3-3---------------------------------------------|

(Palm muting the open D for better effect)
Last edited by mikey_360 at Jan 8, 2010,
#8
Very interesting... It certainly makes playing it a heck of a lot easier, that's for sure. I guess theortetically you could play this song in E standard pretty easily, but you'd have to improvise a chord for the open low E/A/D chord. I never really thought about that, or first fret power chords, so thanks for pointing that out... I knew it had to be more than just easier playing as I imagine any of these guys are good enough to play it any way.
#9
Quote by potatohead_33
but you'd have to improvise a chord for the open low E/A/D chord. .


actually the open low would be a D A D chord
the first D you meet in standard is on the A string the 5th fret