#1
Heya

I've used this chord used a lot as an alternative to the typical powerchord, I just want to get the name.

for example, this starts on an A and uses the fourth. Does this make it "A4"?

e--
B--
G--
D--7
A--5
E--5

I'm assuming this because your normal powerchord is called "A5"
Last edited by SilverSpurs616 at Jan 8, 2010,
#2
Well, the way i see these is as an inversion of a power chord, with the fifth as lowest note, which would make this a D5 or D5/A. Don't know if that is "officially" correct, though.
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#3
Quote by Zhuriel
Well, the way i see these is as an inversion of a power chord, with the fifth as lowest note, which would make this a D5 or D5/A. Don't know if that is "officially" correct, though.


The fifth isn't the lowest note, the root is. There are 2 A's and 1 D in this chord, D being the 4th


EDIT: Actually, I see what you mean now and I could agree with that
#4
I only know it's used in Satriani's Lights of Heaven ... It's a sort of power chord. Going from a standard PC to this kind is nice-sounding.
#5
Quote by Zhuriel
Well, the way i see these is as an inversion of a power chord, with the fifth as lowest note, which would make this a D5 or D5/A. Don't know if that is "officially" correct, though.


Yes, D5/A would be the technically correct name for the chord!
#6
So, D5 with A in the bass? I'm just trying to fully understand so that I don't tab something wrong. D5/A sounds good though
#7
Could it not be an Adim5 chord? I agree with the D5/A too, maybe it's both, depending on the key you're in?

Edit: Actually, the Adim5 is definitely wrong. To be an Adim5 it'd be:
e--
B--
G--
D--7
A--6
E--5
Stupid me!
Last edited by sebwillis1 at Jan 8, 2010,
#8
It's a A4. If it didn't have the octave it would be easier to argue for it being an inverted D5.

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#9
yeah its relative

you can see it as an a chord, in which case it would be A4 or as a d chord in which case it would be a D5/A chord
#11
Quote by STABxYOU
It's a A4. If it didn't have the octave it would be easier to argue for it being an inverted D5.

Ultimately, it's relative.

no, it isnt. its an inversion of an D5 chord. you can call it D5/A if you want, but you cannot call it an A4. when naming chords, you look at the order of strengths of intervals. its something like 3-5-7-2-4-6, but i know the first half of that is right. so you look for the third and fifth way before you look for the fourth.

hell, the thing technically isnt a chord anywy. chords require three notes. but if you were naming it, its an inversion of a D5 "chord."
#12
Quote by jof1029
its something like 3-5-7-2-4-6


It's 3-5-7-9-11-13, I think, which is basically the same. The 4th would be called an 11th in a chord, iirc. But an A11 is more than just A and D, there would be 5ths and 3rds also, I think.
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#13
yeah, an A11 would be A, C#, E, G, B, D. you can leave out a few notes, the 5th being a common one to leave out (the E here).

you can use a 4th in a chord, but it would be replacing the third. otherwise, as you said its usually called an 11th.
#14
Quote by jof1029
you can use a 4th in a chord, but it would be replacing the third.


That would be a sus4.
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#16
It's a D5.
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#17
Yep it's a D5. The higher A note is the standard 5th of the D chord. What you're doing in this chord is playing an extra A note an octave lower to thicken up the sound of the chord. It's actually quite common.
#18
Quote by AlexAngus
Yep it's a D5. The higher A note is the standard 5th of the D chord. What you're doing in this chord is playing an extra A note an octave lower to thicken up the sound of the chord. It's actually quite common.


I couldent agree with you more, D is the root chord, and A is just added on top of it, I like to use it in place of a D power chord to thicken up the songs, I use these kind of chords alot.