#1
Didn't know how else to name this one, but how do you count the beats as you're playing? Do you count 1-2-3-4 or count the lowest subdivision in the song (like 1e&a2e...etc. for a solo)? I don't really know how to explain it but I've been having a little trouble while playing along with songs while trying to count the notes/rhythms.
#2
I don't and likely wouldn't count anything at all while playing along with accompaniment... but that's just me and I'm not an expert.
#4
I think you had it with counting with the lowest subdivision of the notes, and of course blahblahpracticeblah
#5
depends on the speed of the song, and how syncopated my part is. "1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &" is usually the easiest for me
#6
I don't really count. I mean, I sometimes count 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. before I enter with a solo, riff, etc. But on the whole I don't count. I feel it man
I'll pretend I can mod your amp but break it instead.
#7
I count with my foot... yup my foot is that smart.

down is 1, up is +.

when it gets into triplets I ignore up, and just cocentrate on down (the main beat.)


EDIT:
Generally starting at I will count everything. Whether it be 1e+a or 1+a or whatever, but after I get the hang of it, I generally just feel it. If I have to wait for ages, I will count out the bars that I have rest or whatever.
Last edited by mdwallin at Jan 8, 2010,
#9
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i honestly never count out the beat, i just play. i find counting makes it harder for me to find the groove.


Even when its stuff where the time signature changes every couple bars, and they're all irregular?
#10
I wouldn't recommend counting by traditional means when soloing. You really need to feel the music not only for your audiences benefit but for yours as well - it's hard to enjoy the music while you're constantly thinking "one and two ee and uh!!

I'm not saying you should disregard the timing entirely, though, especially if you're working with some unusual time signatures. I once saw an interview with Al Dimeola where he explained what he did; I have done the same ever since and it's always served me well.

Use your foot to keep time with the basic beats (one..two..three..four). Once you do it for long enough you're going to be so used to it that you won't even have to think about it. You'll just know when that next beat is coming. Then you can mess around with it if you like, even adding 32nd notes in between beats or just before one. That's the essence of fusion.

But like I said, it all becomes automatic. Use your head to enjoy the music.
#11
I don't count unless i'm playing rhythm and that's normally just quavers and crochets anyway. Counting for leads normally makes my playing sound robotic. I like a nice loose-sounding lead.
1 2

Little solace comes
to those who grieve
as thoughts keep drifting
as walls keep shifting
and this great blue world of ours
seems a House of Leaves

My Rig
Quote by Will Swanson
HeavyReverb = Hero of The Pit 2010.
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You sir are my absolute hero.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
Even when its stuff where the time signature changes every couple bars, and they're all irregular?

I think you'd be in the minority if you were playing stuff like that...
The only songs I've played have been in 5/4, 4/4, 3/4, 2/4, 6/8, 3/8, 12/8, 9/8 or 7/8... everything else seems to be a little out of the genres I'm into.
#13
Quote by isaac_bandits
Even when its stuff where the time signature changes every couple bars, and they're all irregular?

well seeing as i mostly play blues and rock, that pretty much never happens. ive played some songs with odd timming and some jazz stuff and honestly, again i find it makes it harder for me to have the counting. i find it easier to just listen and then do it. i hardly ever know what time signaure im in unless its like a striaght forward rock or blues song.

for example reggae. i remember everyone saying it was a little hard to get the timing right because of where the accents are. i just listened and played and never understood what the big deal was. but as soon as i start counting i lose it.
#14
I play a lot of stuff in shifting time signatures and I still find that what works best for me is just listening through and finding the groove. Counting is useful for figuring stuff out and such though.
#15
As said before, counting like that throws me off. Even if I'm drumming. Or stop in the middle of the song and 4 count back into it. Playing with a click track in your ear is good if you're having trouble staying on beat, but otherwise, feel the music. You'll get better at it as time goes on, and the idea of counting will be gone. If you're transcribing music and you want everything perfect, counting isn't a bad idea, but outside of that, constantly counting will hurt more than help. You're using part of your brain that could be playing better leads or somethin.
#16
I tend to work around accents and particular memory more.

I work with a lot of odd time signatures and counter rhythms, so the groove, accenting and dynamics are defining factors for me. The accent may not necessarily be on the beat, and the accent may interchange between feels (straight, syncopated, swung), so it really is about the groove and responding to the dynamics and accenting more - both mentally and physically.

The memory aspect isn't so much remembering what to do, but more muscle and responsive memory. I'll isolate parts, and practice them slowly, and when I do, I'll count to suit the lowest denominator (usually 16ths, grouped 1 e & a), and tap my foot to the 8th or quarter to reinforce timing. It's more the practice of understanding and digesting the piece of music. Accenting when practicing helps too, because it provides a reference point, but I usually change it later - once the memory of how to play the phrase and stay tight sinks it - to better suit and compliment the music.

Counting really is valuable for remaining in time, most particularly for practice, as it's a more effective method of developing consistency and control over timing - even if you're changing tempos, feels, genres, and time signatures especially and/or rapidly. Also, always keep in mind to respond to and mark out dynamics and accenting; a groove is invaluable in music.
A controlled rhythmic component is one of the most valuable a musician can have, in any circumstance.

Alex
Last edited by juckfush at Jan 9, 2010,
#17
Quote by mdwallin
I count with my foot... yup my foot is that smart.

down is 1, up is +.

when it gets into triplets I ignore up, and just cocentrate on down (the main beat.)


EDIT:
Generally starting at I will count everything. Whether it be 1e+a or 1+a or whatever, but after I get the hang of it, I generally just feel it. If I have to wait for ages, I will count out the bars that I have rest or whatever.
This.


You changed your avatar!
#18
I don't really count most of the time. I only count if I'm trying to learn a song that has a weird time signature or something, but once I have it down I just feel it. I've just always found staying in time really easy (except for stuff like meshuggah, I have to really try for that)

as far as the 1&2&3& vs 1e&a2e&a3e&a or whatever - it really just depends on how fast the song is. If it's really slow like Black Sabbath by Black Sabbath I tend to count more in between spaces.


edit: ^ holy shit, she did! I didn't even recognize her til I saw your post.