#1
I saw a video of a guitar seminar Kurt Rosenwinkel gave to a class, and he talked about how, to practice playing chord changes, he would set his metronome slow and play through scales off his head, and then whenever the chord changes, he'd shift to the closest note in the scale of that chord, or something to that effect.

Has anyone tried this? Or does anyone have any further extension on this? I have not yet practiced it, but it seems like a very good idea.
#2
I'm a bassist, it's almost ALL i do

it is a good way of practising playing over chords and being aware of what you're doing rather than hitting random scales. Why not also try landing on the 3rd or 5th of each chord, maybe put some double stops in too (play root and 3rd so you think whether it's minor or major for example)
#4
Quote by hippieboy444
I saw a video of a guitar seminar Kurt Rosenwinkel gave to a class, and he talked about how, to practice playing chord changes, he would set his metronome slow and play through scales off his head, and then whenever the chord changes, he'd shift to the closest note in the scale of that chord, or something to that effect.

Has anyone tried this? Or does anyone have any further extension on this? I have not yet practiced it, but it seems like a very good idea.

Just to clarify, you wont want to change scales when the chord changes, you just want to use a chord tone from the same scale.

I'll give a quick example in case you're not sure what I mean. The song is in G major so you use the G major scale to improvise. First chord is G, so start the phrase on a G, B or D (The G major chord tones). Next is C so play a C, E or G when it changes. Next is D so play D, F# or A at the right time. Notice it's all still in G major (GABCDEF#).

Thats the basics anyway. Once you get more advance, there may be times you feel it would be appropriate to use different scales.

And if you ARE already advanced to that level, sorry for wasting your time
Last edited by chrisweyers at Jan 10, 2010,