#1
Just have a couple questions that I'm confused about:

-If you know all your major scales don't you also know all your minor scales?

-If you're playing a power chord on the piano, and if it's easier to play it with the fifth on top, would you be actually playing a 4 chord? I know they both invert to the same thing but it's confusing. If you play GC (for a C5 chord), instead of CG there's a perfect fourth in between instead of a fifth, resulting in a different sound.

Ha, or thats the whole purpose of a inversion. The thing is on guitar everybody knows the x13xxx fingering so there is no 'whatever's eaiser' atleast for that chord.
#2
The minor scale is just the major scale starting on the 6th scale degree, so yes.


And to the second question, it really depends on what you want to call it.
#3
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
-If you know all your major scales don't you also know all your minor scales?

I don't know if you mean neckwise, or notewise, but if you mean notewise then yes it's easy just flatten the 3rd, 6th, and 7th degrees.

Quote by d1sturbed4eva
-If you're playing a power chord on the piano, and if it's easier to play it with the fifth on top, would you be actually playing a 4 chord? I know they both invert to the same thing but it's confusing. If you play GC (for a C5 chord), instead of CG there's a perfect fourth in between instead of a fifth, resulting in a different sound.

I'm not sure what you're asking. If you play a 5 chord, then it's a 5. And if you play a 4, it's a 4.
#4
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
Just have a couple questions that I'm confused about:

-If you know all your major scales don't you also know all your minor scales?

-If you're playing a power chord on the piano, and if it's easier to play it with the fifth on top, would you be actually playing a 4 chord? I know they both invert to the same thing but it's confusing. If you play GC (for a C5 chord), instead of CG there's a perfect fourth in between instead of a fifth, resulting in a different sound.

Ha, or thats the whole purpose of a inversion. The thing is on guitar everybody knows the x13xxx fingering so there is no 'whatever's eaiser' atleast for that chord.



In principle yes... but it's the same logic as saying "i know my alphabet so i know C major". You know what the notes are, but until you understand how they relate in the conext of a minor scale over a minor progression i wouldn't say you know your minor, only the notes in it. In reality you're probably familiar enough with the sound of the minor scale to say you understand it, but remember it is not just the major scale played on a differen point on the neck. It's a scale in it's own right.

- By 5th in top i assume you mean the 5th is the highest note, which is the way a standard power chord is constructed E5 has a E on the low e-string and a B on the A string, the B is on top surely?

As it is power chords aren't really chords at all, they are dyads or double stops. You need 3 or more notes to make a chord.

For inversions of full chords, then yes it i possible to give the same set of notes different chord names (as any "chord computer" will show you) however only one is (normally) correct and it is largely a contextual thing, it's fairly tricky to explain here goes:
It is essentially what note the chord resolves to, in the same way you could have a chord sequence F G C G and still be in C major even though it doesn't start or end on it - but resolves to it.
If you can't work out where it resolves to the standard conventions are (in no order):
- the name chosen should be appropriate to other melody lines
- It should be appropriate to the chords around it ( Am Bbm Ddim C doesn't make sense, go for Am Bbm Bdim C as it acends chromatically)
- Simple names are preferred (C E G A = A7 not Cadd13)
- lowest notes are commonly the roots unless an inversion is stated, (this is more a guideline than a rule)

Last and most important: So long as it's CLEAR to everyone one who needs to read it what to play and what it means it doesn't matter what you name it