#1
Hey guys, iv'e been playing about one year. I'm curious, what exactly is legato and what are some good scales to practice legato on? Thanks so much
#3
Please disregard the idiot above me.

Legato means to play each note consecutively with no rests separating the notes.
The opposite would be staccato. Which has a rest separating the notes; usually the rests/notes are divided according to the time signature.
Example: In 4/4. Just playing a single note, Staccato would generally hit on the down beats of 1,2,3 and 4 with rests(muting the string to stop the note) on the upbeats.
Legato lets the notes ring out but still picking on the downbeats.
#4
Quote by musicman1012
Please disregard the idiot above me.

Legato means to play each note consecutively with no rests separating the notes.
The opposite would be staccato. Which has a rest separating the notes; usually the rests/notes are divided according to the time signature.
Example: In 4/4. Just playing a single note, Staccato would generally hit on the down beats of 1,2,3 and 4 with rests(muting the string to stop the note) on the upbeats.
Legato lets the notes ring out but still picking on the downbeats.


You need some serious help dude. Tenfold had it right. Shut the f**k up until you learn what you're talking about. Legato is more or less just defined as hammer ons and pull offs.
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#6
Quote by Junior#1
You need some serious help dude. Tenfold had it right. Shut the f**k up until you learn what you're talking about. Legato is more or less just defined as hammer ons and pull offs.


No, he's right, you're wrong, and both of you need to stop being so childish and insulting of other forum members.

Legato a musical term indicating that notes are played in a smooth, connected fashion. Guitarists have abused the term and often use it to describe playing techniques that do not require picking (hammer-ons, pull-offs and taps, mostly). This is incorrect, as legato (strictly speaking) would require there being a slight overlapping of notes, something not possible when playing a sequence of notes on a single string. Swept arpeggios would be the best example I could think of demomstrating something that is true legato that can be played on a guitar.
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#7
also try to alternate pick some riffs you know.. the notes wil sound more "linked togheter" if you do it right. combine this with some nice hammeron, pulloff action and you will have way a more legato "smooth" sound.
#8
Quote by Prophet of Page
No, he's right, you're wrong, and both of you need to stop being so childish and insulting of other forum members.

Legato a musical term indicating that notes are played in a smooth, connected fashion. Guitarists have abused the term and often use it to describe playing techniques that do not require picking (hammer-ons, pull-offs and taps, mostly). This is incorrect, as legato (strictly speaking) would require there being a slight overlapping of notes, something not possible when playing a sequence of notes on a single string. Swept arpeggios would be the best example I could think of demomstrating something that is true legato that can be played on a guitar.


I think some of the confusion comes from the fact that notes marked "legato" are more often than not played with "hammer-ons" and "pull-offs". Legato doesn't require a slight overlap, just not gap between the notes, which is normally best achieved with hammer-ons etc,.

Legato isn't "defined as" hammer-ons and pull-offs, it's "achieved with" hammer-ons and pull-offs.

I think sometimes guitarists forget the difference between a technique on guitar and a musical device or concept (another example of this being: tremolo and tremolo picking).

Oh yeh, and the insulting that's going on is just pathetic.
#9
Quote by musicman1012
Please disregard the idiot above me.

Legato means to play each note consecutively with no rests separating the notes.
The opposite would be staccato. Which has a rest separating the notes; usually the rests/notes are divided according to the time signature.
Example: In 4/4. Just playing a single note, Staccato would generally hit on the down beats of 1,2,3 and 4 with rests(muting the string to stop the note) on the upbeats.
Legato lets the notes ring out but still picking on the downbeats.


This is right on the legato definition, but I'm inclined to disagree with the way in which you defined staccato because staccato is not a rhythm therefore would not be notated with rests. It is a technique in which notes are pluck but not allowed to "ring out." A note played staccato might still be given a quarter note notation and marked as staccato, not an 8th note and an 8th rest. Least ways all the sheet music I played when I played piano and in orchestra was notated that way.
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#11
Quote by chainsawguitar
Legato doesn't require a slight overlap, just not gap between the notes, which is normally best achieved with hammer-ons etc


"Overlapping" was probably the wrong word, there are "legato" techniques on instruments where it is not possible to play "overlapping" notes (wind instruments, for example), I was trying to express the idea that the sequence should be seamless in a sense, where as a sequence of hammer-ons and pull-offs is inherently disjointed, while it's very possible to play a swept arpeggio legato.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#12
Quote by Prophet of Page
"Overlapping" was probably the wrong word, there are "legato" techniques on instruments where it is not possible to play "overlapping" notes (wind instruments, for example), I was trying to express the idea that the sequence should be seamless in a sense, where as a sequence of hammer-ons and pull-offs is inherently disjointed, while it's very possible to play a swept arpeggio legato.


I don't know about you but I can't hear any gaps in my hammer-ons and pull-offs, maybe you should look at what you're doing again?
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#13
ok wait. easy way to fix this discussion. legato = slur.

At least that's how I always thought of it. There were slurred notes in the sheet music I used to read for trumpet, and now when reading tabs on guitar pro, I see the same slurred lines when there's a legato lick; so it makes sense to best define it that way.

if not, can someone explain the difference between the two?
#14
Quote by Moonshield17
ok wait. easy way to fix this discussion. legato = slur.

At least that's how I always thought of it. There were slurred notes in the sheet music I used to read for trumpet, and now when reading tabs on guitar pro, I see the same slurred lines when there's a legato lick; so it makes sense to best define it that way.

if not, can someone explain the difference between the two?


That's pretty much it, yeah, the hammer-on/pull-off idea is simply the resulting physical means to achieve the sound.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#15
Quote by tele10
Hey guys, iv'e been playing about one year. I'm curious, what exactly is legato and what are some good scales to practice legato on? Thanks so much
Like most of the guys above said, legato basically just means 'smoothly' - so the notes run from one to the next as seamlessly as possible.

Imo the easiest way to practice it using hammer ons and pull off is to take any 7note scale you know (eg major) and play it single string, starting with the first 3 notes of the scale (R 2 3), and work out a pattern to play those 3 notes in using hammer ons and pull offs, then move up to the next 3 notes (2 3 4) and play them the same way with the same pattern, then the next 3 notes (3 4 5) until you get all the way up to R 2 3 an octave above where you started. Then when you get comfortable start mixing up the order and using different sequences.
#16
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I don't know about you but I can't hear any gaps in my hammer-ons and pull-offs, maybe you should look at what you're doing again?


My hammer-ons and pull-offs are very solid. When you play using only the fretting hand on a single string, every note still has a very definite beginning, and a very definite end. The sequence of notes is thus disjointed, though not by any "gaps."
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#17
Quote by Prophet of Page
My hammer-ons and pull-offs are very solid. When you play using only the fretting hand on a single string, every note still has a very definite beginning, and a very definite end. The sequence of notes is thus disjointed, though not by any "gaps."


Disjointed was a bad choice of word then seeing as how it means disconnected.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#18
Quote by Moonshield17
ok wait. easy way to fix this discussion. legato = slur.

At least that's how I always thought of it. There were slurred notes in the sheet music I used to read for trumpet, and now when reading tabs on guitar pro, I see the same slurred lines when there's a legato lick; so it makes sense to best define it that way.

if not, can someone explain the difference between the two?


IIRC slurs go between half tones, and there is no definite point where the note changes. So when you do hammers and pulls you can easily hear the notes between them changed by a fixed amount, whereas a slur would be more like a slide on a fretless instrument.
#19
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Disjointed was a bad choice of word then seeing as how it means disconnected.


In English it probably, but there is a concept of disjointedness in mathematics, and there is a concept of disconnectedness, which are vastly different. The concept of disjointedness as it appears in mathematics is somewhat parallel to it being possible to tell where the notes change. Sometimes I forget that not everybody interprets a word the same way as I do.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#20
Quote by Avedas
IIRC slurs go between half tones, and there is no definite point where the note changes. So when you do hammers and pulls you can easily hear the notes between them changed by a fixed amount, whereas a slur would be more like a slide on a fretless instrument.


ah ok, I guess I forgot about slurs also constituting as slides. or even more so than them being like legato. thanks for pointing that out.