#1
Strumming chords and stuff I can usually keep good timing but when it comes to arpeggios and 1-note strings I can just tell my timing gets outta wack pretty quick. I tend to creep (start slow and pickup speed). I know playing simple scales to a metronome is a good start but that gets boring pretty quickly, any advice out there for a novice player?
#2
try playing along with songs, that's what I typically do
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#3
use a metronome for your riffs at super slow speeds the raise it by 4 or 8bpm when you are perfectly on time /thread
#4
The author investigated the effects of three syllabic recitation systems on skills associated with the ability to read rhythm notation. Subjects were 160 second- and third-grade children enrolled in public schools in southern Maine. Twelve rhythm patterns containing half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes were used. Random combinations of the twelve patterns were combined into complete measures of 4/4 or 6/8. Subjects were tested on their ability to recognize, write, and clap these patterns. Evaluation of these three skills was based on experimenter-designed tests, and a pretest-posttest experimental design was used. Results showed that a syllabic system that differentiated between duple and triple subdivisions of the beat improved recognition skills to a greater degree than one that did not. Furthermore, a system in which specific words were assigned to intact rhythm patterns improved performance and notation skills to a greater degree than did the two systems that used monosyllables.
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#5
Quote by firebird103
use a metronome for your riffs at super slow speeds the raise it by 4 or 8bpm when you are perfectly on time /thread



That's hardly /thread. You can do scale exercises at slowly increasing speed for decades and still have no grasp of rhythm or groove.

The only solution I'm aware of is to start playing music with people and play lots and lots of rhythm. A drum machine is a poor substitute, but is better than a metronome.
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#6
^ yup, super slow metronomic practice isn't really useful here.

Don't forget you can practice this stuff in your head, as you walk to school or sit in the bus, tap your foot and imagine some great guitar playing.

Then when you get home, figure out what you were imagining.
#8
Quote by Even Bigger D
The only solution I'm aware of is to start playing music with people and play lots and lots of rhythm. A drum machine is a poor substitute, but is better than a metronome.
It's funny that you say that cuz out here in podunk town I dunno anyone here that plays. So other night this band from Jersey checks into our hotel, I wasn't a big fan of their music but it was really cool to chill and watch em play. It was more helpful than I thought ... made me realize I need to connect with more musicians.
#9
Quote by wheelz1045
Start tapping your foot (in time) when you play something.


This. Some people just have rhythm, the rest of us learn by doing. My father is a drummer and he falls into the group of naturals, I had to learn rhythm.

Firstly, it's important that you understand the difference between rhythm and timing. Timing is the matter of when the notes are played relative to the beat, so in a sense, "perfect" timing would involve the correct notes landing precisely on the beat every time. Rhythm is much more important, the matter is no longer where we are relative to the beat, but whether we can play coherently with it, in a sense, that the notes have the correct "flow," regardless if whether or not the notes land perfectly on the beat divisions.

There are plenty of players who have excellent timing when playing to a simple rock beat. There are much fewer who can play to any beat coherently.

First, let me suggest you put the metronome away for a while, you don't need it. What you do need is something that will play you different beats, so you can learn to play them. A good drummer is best but a drum machine will serve you considerably better than a bad drummer. Begin by playing to a straight beat with the usual 4 beats to a bar. If you find yourself drifting from the beat, you've got problems. Serious, serious problems that will take considerable time to rectify, and it will be urgent that you fix that problem immediately. If this does happen, I'd recommend you listen to simple songs, count the beats, and tap along on a table (or anything else), until you can do it without thinking about it. This sounds simple, but if you don't have a basic grasp of rhythm, you won't be able to do it.

Assuming you can play coherently with a straight beat, you should move on to playing to other beats, beginning with simple rock beats, then shuffles. Once you've mastered the usual beats, you should move on to more complicated beats, like a Latin beat, then moving on to Carnatic beats (don't expect to be able to do this anytime soon).

As was mentioned, you can practice rhythm in your head. You can practice rhythm anywhere. Try walking to a beat while listening to music. Also, if you're more advanced, I recommend you read my posts in this thread.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1187337
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#10
Metronome, metronome, metronome, also look up bleed-meshuggah. Awesome rhythm guitar work there
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#11
I noticed that everyone is recomending a drummer, or a drum machine over a metronome. Well, I say that all you need is a metronome (I mean, what do you think drummers use?).

Try playing different divisions of the beat: one note, two notes, three, five... this exercise can improve your timing significantly. It doesn't matter what you play to- you just need something keeping time.

After that you can start to push and pull the beat a bit- playing slightly ahead of or slightly behind the metronome click.
#12
Quote by chainsawguitar
I noticed that everyone is recomending a drummer, or a drum machine over a metronome. Well, I say that all you need is a metronome (I mean, what do you think drummers use?).


Firstly, regarding what drummers use, the majority that I know tend not to use anything to keep time. The approach for those learning drums would probably be to (this is hwo the little drumming I can do was taught to me) first learn how to keep a steady straight beat (essentially the equivalent of the metronome click, one would hope you could master this quickly) first, then gradually increase the complexity. The same principle applies to more complicated beats. ou begin with a stripped down version that you can keep in time, then increase the complexity again.

I don't believe a metronome will suffice. Rhythm for drummers usually involves being able to provide a beat that is in perfect (or at least close to perfect) time. For guitarists, rhythm is more about playing to the beat, rather than providing the beat. It is easy to play to a straight metronome click or a steady rock beat, but this won't prepare you to play to a more complex beat, like a Latin or salsa beat. For this, you need a drum machine or a good drummer if possible. I recommend the drummer, as a drum machine does not orchestrate the beat, it will remain as programmed. A good drummer on the other hand will make subtle changes to the rhythmic pattern (they too are creative musicians after all), which can be confusing to play to if you're not used to it.

Quote by chainsawguitar
Try playing different divisions of the beat: one note, two notes, three, five... this exercise can improve your timing significantly. It doesn't matter what you play to- you just need something keeping time.


I agree with the validity of the excercise, but I don't believe rhythm and timing are the same thing. If you can't fluently change between those note divisions (2s to and from 4s likely being the easist to master, personally I find 5s to and from 7s to be the toughest) or begin the note division at any space in the beat it won't help your rhythm, only your ability to play a string of evenly spaced note precisely to a simple beat, where you can always "find the one."
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#13
I would say get with a friend and practice jamming over blues patterns (because they build a good sense of 'squareness') or use backing tracks/drum beats instead of a metronome, or if you can find a good teacher that can help you with that specific issue would probably be the best option.
#14
Quote by Prophet of Page

I don't believe a metronome will suffice. Rhythm for drummers usually involves being able to provide a beat that is in perfect (or at least close to perfect) time. For guitarists, rhythm is more about playing to the beat, rather than providing the beat. It is easy to play to a straight metronome click or a steady rock beat, but this won't prepare you to play to a more complex beat, like a Latin or salsa beat. For this, you need a drum machine or a good drummer if possible.


I don't see why you would need a drum machine. Even if you're playing a complex RHYTHM (if that's what you mean?) you need to be aware of where the BEAT is.

Quote by Prophet of Page
I agree with the validity of the excercise, but I don't believe rhythm and timing are the same thing. If you can't fluently change between those note divisions (2s to and from 4s likely being the easist to master, personally I find 5s to and from 7s to be the toughest) or begin the note division at any space in the beat it won't help your rhythm, only your ability to play a string of evenly spaced note precisely to a simple beat, where you can always "find the one."


How are rhythm and timing a different thing? Surely you need good timing to judge the rhythm?

You seem to be saying that you need good "rhythm" first, which doesn't make sense because that's what we're trying to achieve. I think you'll find that "good timing" is something that you can improve and that will help you play "rhythms". I think you have these words confused- rhythm isn't something you have, its something you play. Timing is what you have to improve to play rhythms.

This is why a metronome is all that is needed.
#15
Quote by Quaned
Metronome, metronome, metronome, also look up bleed-meshuggah. Awesome rhythm guitar work there


How is listening to complex and confusing rhythm work going to help someone get their own sense of rhythm in order?
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#16
I find using Guitar Pro useful when learning a new song. Use the "Apply to Coefficient to the Tempo" function to decrease speed to 0.5, 0.75 and then try to jam along in normal speed.

You can also use a program like VLC media player to slow down the speed of the song and jam along to the slowed down version and once you've cracked it at a certain speed, increase the playback speed slightly until you're challenged again. Repeat until you can play the song at full speed.
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#17
Quote by chainsawguitar
I don't see why you would need a drum machine. Even if you're playing a complex RHYTHM (if that's what you mean?) you need to be aware of where the BEAT is.


No, you've entirely missed what I mean. I'm not talking about playing rhythm guitar, I'm talking about playing the guitar with rhythm. When learning the rhythm guitar part of a piece, I agree that you should only need a metronome, but you can learn all the rhythm guitar parts you want and still not have rhythm.

A metronome can only ever provide a steady click, or straight beat. Learning how to play to a complex beat is something you cannot learn from playing to a metronome.


Quote by chainsawguitar
How are rhythm and timing a different thing?


Rhythm is about coherency to a beat and overall "flow." Timing is about where relative to the beat you want to be when playing. If you don't understand what I mean, you don't understand music.

Quote by chainsawguitar
Surely you need good timing to judge the rhythm?


You can have excellent timing relative to a steady click and have no rhythm. You can have excellent rhythm and be slightly off on timing.

Quote by chainsawguitar
You seem to be saying that you need good "rhythm" first, which doesn't make sense because that's what we're trying to achieve.


Yes, of incredible importantance to every musician is rhythm. I'm trying to give a way by which those who don't naturally have it can develop it.

Quote by chainsawguitar
I think you'll find that "good timing" is something that you can improve and that will help you play "rhythms".


Having good timing helps you play rhythm parts, it does not help you have rhythm.

Quote by chainsawguitar
I think you have these words confused- rhythm isn't something you have, its something you play.


Wrong. So, so very wrong.

People have a sense of rhythm (it's actually observed in all higher primates), it's something built into our cerebellum. It's a sense that allows us to coordinate movement coherent to a beat. Some people naturally have a highly developed sense of rhythm, others don't and need to deveop it.

Quote by chainsawguitar
Timing is what you have to improve to play rhythms.

This is why a metronome is all that is needed.


Better timing helps you play rhythm parts with better timing, that is all, and yes, you need a metronome for that. Rhythm is entirely different. To develop rhythm, you need something to provide you with different beats. There are many musicians who can play wit perfect timing to a steady click or simple rock beat and are incapable of playing to a complex Latin or African beat.
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