#1
Is this difficult, or just one of those pop-in-pop-out things? Any special tools or soldering required? I don't necessarily plan to do this soon, I'm just trying to expand my technical knowledge. I did a quick search with no result. Forgive me if i overlooked something.
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#2
O.o

Is that even possible?
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#4
It's much more of a pain in the ass than it's worth. B+ voltages would change and that must be compensated for in other ways. The layout would need to be significantly changed.
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#5
Just to clarify in case of possible misunderstanding: I'm talking about the component rectifier, not the Mesa model name rectifier.

In other words, just talking about changing one part, not changing a tube amp to a SS.

This, for example:
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Last edited by Sunn_O))) at Jan 11, 2010,
#6
Quote by Sunn_O)))
Just to clarify in case of possible misunderstanding: I'm talking about the component rectifier, not the Mesa model name rectifier.

In other words, just talking about changing one part, not changing a tube amp to a SS.


A rectifier is part of the power supply. I suggest you do some serious reading up on what you're doing.
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#7
Quote by mmolteratx
A rectifier is part of the power supply. I suggest you do some serious reading up on what you're doing.


Not planning on doing anything, really.

Just trying to get my learn on.

And yes, I knew it was a power component.
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Last edited by Sunn_O))) at Jan 11, 2010,
#8
Quote by Sunn_O)))
Not planning on doing anything, really.

Just trying to get my learn on.


Alright. If you'd just like to know more, a quick Google search will bring up a few good web sites. A good one for beginners is AX84. They're very helpful and will recommend a few books if you want to really get into it and will answer in as much detail as you want any questions you may have. I'd highly recommend it if you want to get started. And the difference in tone between a SS rectifier and tube rectifier is extremely negligible, unless you're running your amp at full strain in which case the tube rectifier will start to 'sag' a bit. Most people prefer the SS rectifier.
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#10
If your amp has a tube rectifier, it's very easy to switch to solid state.
Just buy a replacement that is mounted on an octal socket like your rectifier tube.
You should be familiar with your amp's schematic, or have a tech look it over.
There is much less voltage drop across a solid state rectifier than across a tube rectifier.
This means your amp will have a higher DC supply. It's possible this voltage could exceed the ratings of your filter caps and/or the maximum allowable voltage on the plates of your output tubes.

Most amps with tube rectifiers will not have a problem with the increased DC voltage, but you want to be SURE your amp can handle it before you try this.

With a solid state rectifier, your amp will have more headroom. You'll have to get louder before the power amp distorts. Depending on your wants and needs, this might be good or it might be contrary to what you're trying to achieve.


Changing an amp that was built with a solid state rectifier is another matter entirely. You aren't likely to have a separate 5 VAC filament winding on your power transformer. And you will have to add a large hole in the chassis for a rectifier tube. These two additions are more costly in terms of labor and parts.

Might be worth it though. The sag provided by a tube rectifier is awesome. Solid state rectifiers kinda suck, by comparison.
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#11
Too much hassle for little difference, don't bother. Obviously it's possible, but not worth the effort.

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#12
I know it can be very hard to find replacement parts for SS amps, is it equally as hard to find replacement SS rectifiers for tube amps? I know SS rectifiers have a good reputation for reliability, but it'd be nice to know I could get a replacement if needed.

I'm making the jump to a tube amp soon and want to learn all I can about it. I am well versed in the tonal advantages they offer, but I'm a complete noob on the technical side. I think if someone owns something of value, he should take the time to acquire a decent amount of knowledge about it.
I know there are other threads about tube amps; I just had a couple of very specific questions that were not answered in them.
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Last edited by Sunn_O))) at Jan 11, 2010,
#13
Im highly certain it isn't just a "pop in pop out" procedure. im pretty sure its a "take your amp apart, and totally rebuild it" procedure if its even possible at all.
#14
As Someoneyouknow said, it's very easy to replace a tube rectifier with a solid state rectifier. They have solid state plug ins, Weber has one called the copper cap that does the job. Metroamp also has one, they're like $10-$15. You just pop out the tube rectifier and plug in the new one. But like Someoneyouknow said, it increases the B+ and you have to rebias and make sure the filter cans can handle the new high voltage.

Putting a tube rectifier into an amp with SS rectification is more difficult and involved.

Tonal advantage is a cleaner, tighter sound. It's fine if you're into metal and want something tight and focused, but a tube rectifier has its merits. A tube rectifier lowers headroom (more breakup at lower volumes), they're less efficient and also causes the amp to "sag" when drawing the most power (ie, when you turn it and when you play with a more aggressive pick attack), this causes a slight delay between the time when you pick the note and when the note's peak volume is reached so on low notes you get a sagging kind of response, on the higher notes you have the same effect but when you pick a note it sort of blooms, like a slight reverse delay, it's a cool sound, I have a tube rectifier on my JTM45 and it adds a good deal of touch response and adds some interesting dynamics to your sound.

Some people don't really like it, if you like to play fast on low notes and like to palm mute those fast riffs then it's going to get really loose and muddy because the amp simply cannot keep up. Repsonse on the high notes may also not be quick enough if you're playing Steve Vai esque leads.
Last edited by al112987 at Jan 11, 2010,
#15
Also, with SS rectifiers they often use a bridge rectifier as opposed to a 2 diode rectifier with a centre tapped transformer. A valve rectifier is two diodes in a bottle and uses a centre tapped transformer. Therefore, if you have a SS rectifier chances are that you don't have the right type of transformer. It is still possible to do it in that case anyway but not with a single valve and quite frankly not worth the trouble.
Going the other direction, ie converting a valve rectifier to a SS one is a piece of cake.
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#16
Your Power tube must be compatible to them (meaning it should have a non-center tapped, one 5 and one 0 ACV slot to connect to the plate's of the tube)

There's a PSD on ax84 about these tubes and it breifly expains tube rectifiers and how you can add one.
Last edited by stykerwolf at Jan 11, 2010,