#1
Well the bottom line is, I'm tired of being a newby guitarists who can't really do anything but improvise to silly jam tracks and play songs that other people have created. I want to be as good as my idols, but I really just don't know what exactly to practice.

I've taken the first steps and gotten a teacher, and I've been playing 2-6 hours a day for about 10 months now. I fully understand that most people aren't born shredding and thrashing like madmen with a flying V haha, but I just want to know how much time a person puts into their instrument to get to the level of my idols (Dimebag, Gilbert, Hendrix, Schuldiner, Friedman, Satriani, etc....)? How the hell did they do it??

I'm not really sure what I'm asking you guys, I guess what it really comes down to is practice, practice, practice... I just kinda seem like I'm not getting anywhere. =(
#2
at least 4 I would say (slash0 although John Fruscainte of the chili peppers played around 12 hours a day, although it doesnt make much snese to force yourself to play, it would ratehr ruin teh fun
#3
It takes a while. Hell, I've been playing for over 5 years now, and I still feel like a noob sometimes.

Don't give up though! The outcome is worth it.

I can tell you what usually happens for me.

It doesn't seem like my playing ability is constantly climbing uphill. What usually happens, is I'll be at about the same ability level for a while, then all of a sudden, I'll make drastic leaps in my skill. I know a few others who had it happen that way too. Its almost like I'll learn a ton of stuff in my sleep, and be better overnight.

Not everyone is like that though. Just keep at it. I guarantee that Satch wasn't the Satch that we know and love today after just 10 months of playing!
Quote by rmr024
Well, in California, people carry around devices that control the minds of bears. So expect to see people walking their bears.

Also, don't be surprised if some robot hookers try to solicit sex to you on the streets.
#4
its sorta like climbing a mountain dude.... you climb (this being the noticeable skill increase) and then you come to a plateau where you camp for awhile then you start climbing again.
just keep at it. the first year and a bit for me werent that great but i feel a lot better about playing now than what i did then. im by no means satriani or dime but its not about being the best, just have fun with it
Quote by thanksgiving


One time my girlfriends mum was showing me a picture of her brother blowing out a birthday cake and I laughed cause he had a funny look on his face like he blew too hard.

Turns out he has Downs Syndrome.
#5
I could never force myself to play that long. There's just too many things to do in this oh so beautiful world

In fact it wasn't until this year that I finally got to the level where I could practice for 3 hours straight (for the last 9 years I would normally play for ½ an hour, sometimes 1 to 2 hours max) but the bottom line is: it doesn't really matter how much you practice, the real question is are you happy with yourself! (pretty deep huh)

I don't know how good you are but I'm pretty sure you're no Dimebag yet, and if that's your ultimate goal then yeah, you're likely to be a very frustrated person for a very long time to come. Everyone wants to kick ass in the long run, but if you wanna find the motivation to keep practicing then perhaps it's better to focus on more short term goals: I wanna learn to play that song, I wanna learn how to tap with both my index and middle finger at the same time, I wanna master this particular exercise, etc. And if even THAT turns out to be frustrating (say you picked a song that was too difficult and is taking forever) there's nothing wrong with turning to easier stuff, as long as it's still challenging and fun to do. I remember feeling pretty down a few years ago because I couldn't play a particular Dream Theater song (the Carpe Diem part from A Change of Seasons). My fingers simply weren't strong enough for that, but a while ago I suddenly remembered I hadn't played that song for ages so I gave it another shot and voila, within an hour I could play it neatly and up to speed. It's signs of progress such as those that keep you motivated

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq0iJzDwbyk&feature=related

Another thing I like to do is just try to play as elegantly as possible (watch Steve Vai's hands while he plays something like Tender Surrender and you'll see what I mean) because I just like the way it sounds (especially when you switch from that to a more aggressive style)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yw74sDWPH7U

And finally there's one more thing I could definetly recommend: try to be as diverse as possible. I mean, if you started playing guitar because you wanna play all of the Satriani repertoire, and that goal still hasn't changed then perhaps it's best to just practice the stuff that he does. If you wanna be a good guitarist however then why not try playing fingerstyle, african gutar licks, bossa nova, jazz or (my favorite) stuff that wasn't originally intended for the guitar at all like, I dunno, Rondo Alla Turca or some crazy Frank Zappa melody (there's lots of those in Echidna's Arf, RDNZL, Inca Roads...) because that way you're more likely to come across stuff you've never played before.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvUaJbosZj4

If you're practicing your scales AND playing fingerstyle AND studying Allan Holdsworth's legato AND messing around with some new tones on your amp you'll find out it's a lot harder to grow tired of playing than if you're just practicing the same pentatonic sweeps over and over again. I now have something play to even when I lost all of my picks again or whenever my left hand wrist is sore (i just start plucking away with my right hand fingers, developing speed there) but the real reason I do this is because I'd like to be a good allround guitarist. There's enough people out there who are only good at shredding

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTI2s4svE2s

I'm tired now...

/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Last edited by shwilly at Jan 11, 2010,
#6
its like climbing a mountain eh... you climb (the noticeable increase in skill) and then you plateau, then you climb again. thats how i've found it anyway... suddenly i'd just get better. but for me the first year of playing wasnt too glamerous... it gets better though dude just keep at it
Quote by thanksgiving


One time my girlfriends mum was showing me a picture of her brother blowing out a birthday cake and I laughed cause he had a funny look on his face like he blew too hard.

Turns out he has Downs Syndrome.
#7
soz for the double post.... page didnt show my first one when i posted the second one...
Quote by thanksgiving


One time my girlfriends mum was showing me a picture of her brother blowing out a birthday cake and I laughed cause he had a funny look on his face like he blew too hard.

Turns out he has Downs Syndrome.
#8
If you don't feel like you're getting anywhere try recording yourself regularly - you may not notice any improvement on a day to day basis, but compare yourself to a month old recording of yourself and you should be able to pick out where you've improved a lot easier.
#9
Thanks a lot for the inspiration guys, I'll surely keep at it. For the past week I've been trying to get in 4 hours a day (which extremely hard when you factor in chores, school, and homework) but I'm getting it. Thanks!
#10
Quote by Unispex
Well the bottom line is, I'm tired of being a newby guitarists who can't really do anything but improvise to silly jam tracks and play songs that other people have created. I want to be as good as my idols, but I really just don't know what exactly to practice.

I've taken the first steps and gotten a teacher, and I've been playing 2-6 hours a day for about 10 months now. I fully understand that most people aren't born shredding and thrashing like madmen with a flying V haha, but I just want to know how much time a person puts into their instrument to get to the level of my idols (Dimebag, Gilbert, Hendrix, Schuldiner, Friedman, Satriani, etc....)? How the hell did they do it??

I'm not really sure what I'm asking you guys, I guess what it really comes down to is practice, practice, practice... I just kinda seem like I'm not getting anywhere. =(


Something to consider.....

most of your heros played guitar all the time because they loved it. They become good as a result....... over a period of time.

Maybe you should take that approach instead of the "Im forcing myself to practice cause I have to be good" method.


Everyone wants to be good. Allow yourself the time it takes to develop the skills, and most importantly...... enjoy the experience. Playing guitar is rewarding at all levels IMO.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 11, 2010,
#11
Running on what zhilla said, I've found that playing back recordings of myself (though I've only done it a few times, lacking a mic) actually makes me sound better in a lot of ways, and is inspiring.

Additionally, if you have timing issues, you will notice them immediately and clearly.
#12
Oh no, don't think that I only play guitar to be like the people I love. I play BECAUSE I love playing, I just wouldn't mind becoming as good as them one day is all. ^_^
#13
A thing to try is playing along to a metronome and recording yourself, it allows you to pick out mistakes that i didn't notice within the first 3 1/2 years of playing guitar such as not playing at a consistent speed, falling out of time, tension in your arms etc. Correcting those problems will show barely, if any, improvement in recordings yet inside you can feel that you're playing better.

Another thing to try is to listen to some music that's motivational - for instance something by malmsteen that makes you awe, or, if you're an arsehole like myself, you could see people playing badly and think 'I'm way better than them - but i could be even better!'

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#14
It depends on how determined you are. If you've got the desire to learn and progress more, you'll be there in no time.