#1
I tried looking up how to play F#6 from google but the result I got was the same as a D7 (x68676). So is there a page or site that shows how to play all chords? Or can you just at least tell me how to play F#6? thanks!
#4
F G A Bb C D E - F Major
F G A Bb C D# E - F Major with a #6

So... F A C D# is what I understand it to be (though I've never heard of #6 chord).

Knowing that, build your own voicing.

I built one real quick, just as an example:

-1- (F)
-1- (C)
-2- (A)
-1- (D#)
-3- (C)
-1- (F)

Barre the first fret.

PS: I can't say with certainty that this is a F#6 chord, but I played it on my guitar and it does, at least, sound musical... lol.
Last edited by freakstylez at Jan 11, 2010,
#5
learn chord construction.it will save u looking up chords
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Tell me what nation on this earth, was not born of tragedy-Primordial
#6
Quote by freakstylez
F G A Bb C D E - F Major
F G A Bb C D# E - F Major with a #6

So... F A C D# is what I understand it to be (though I've never heard of #6 chord).

Knowing that, build your own voicing.

I built one real quick, just as an example:

-1- (F)
-1- (C)
-2- (A)
-1- (D#)
-3- (C)
-1- (F)

Barre the first fret.

PS: I can't say with certainty that this is a F#6 chord, but I played it on my guitar and it does, at least, sound musical... lol.


But that is an F7... your D# should be Eb. F7 is very musical.
#9
An x6 chord is equivalent to an xm7 chord with the root a minor third down/major sixth up. Example: C6 (C E G A) is really just an Am7 (A C E G), because C6 doesn't really function as anything, or at least not in nearly as many scenarios as the Am7.

An x#6 chord should probably be labeled as a dominant 7 chord. i.e. C(#6) would be C E G A#. That's enharmonic to a C7 (C E G Bb). Seeing as the dominant chord actually has a function, you'd use that unless you were in some bizarre, very specific circumstance. You'd probably write it as C add#13, as well. At least, that's how I'd notate it.

So in reference to the TS (if he's asking for an F# with an added 6), it's probably not F#6, it's probably D#m7. If he's asking for an F with an added #6, it's more appropriate to call it F7.
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Jan 11, 2010,
#10
Quote by evolucian
But that is an F7... your D# should be Eb. F7 is very musical.


It's an F7 because it's 1 3 5 b7, yes?

Then I just don't understand how #6 works.

Edit: Unless, as the above poster mentioned, X#6 and X7 are enharmonic. Or, more correctly, X7 is the correct term for an X#6 chord -- which only theoretically exists.

Edit 2: Also, that barre shape seemed familiar. No wonder.
Last edited by freakstylez at Jan 11, 2010,
#11
Quote by freakstylez
It's an F7 because it's 1 3 5 b7, yes?

Then I just don't understand how #6 works.

Edit: Unless, as the above poster mentioned, X#6 and X7 are enharmonic. Or, more correctly, X7 is the correct term for an X#6 chord -- which only theoretically exists.

Edit 2: Also, that barre shape seemed familiar. No wonder.


timeconsumers post is correct, although In a 6 chord... that 6 replaces the 7 and is a nice substitute to the maj7 sound. U wouldn't normally have a #6 chord, as it will most likely be a b7 in that instance, regardless of the enharmonic quality (unless it is stipulated on the score as #6 and not b7)

But in writing a chord... any Letter and # or b is associated with the note and not the degree that must be raised... unless it has an "add" accompanying it. The numbers most commonly associated with sharp (#) is the 5, the 9 and 11. The notes associated with the flats (b) would be the 5 and 9.

These are known as altered chords and are mostly associated to the V chord... except the #11 which is more common as a IV chord than a V chord.

If the chord has raised degrees, they are usually written in small print next to the letter (slightly impossible in this format... slightly... someone will get it right though)
#12
Quote by evolucian
timeconsumers post is correct, although In a 6 chord... that 6 replaces the 7 and is a nice substitute to the maj7 sound. U wouldn't normally have a #6 chord, as it will most likely be a b7 in that instance, regardless of the enharmonic quality (unless it is stipulated on the score as #6 and not b7)

But in writing a chord... any Letter and # or b is associated with the note and not the degree that must be raised... unless it has an "add" accompanying it. The numbers most commonly associated with sharp (#) is the 5, the 9 and 11. The notes associated with the flats (b) would be the 5 and 9.

These are known as altered chords and are mostly associated to the V chord... except the #11 which is more common as a IV chord than a V chord.

If the chord has raised degrees, they are usually written in small print next to the letter (slightly impossible in this format... slightly... someone will get it right though)


Oh, I read the chord itself wrong in the first place, then. I know there's a #5, and so I thought he was implying the same thing, with a #6 instead. Neeeeevermind.