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#1
Alright, last semester in my lutherie program. Our goal this semester is to complete the guitar and have it in a playable state by the end of May.

We were offered 3 different models to pick from. They are all from famous luthiers, so every guitar was tried and tested and proved the test of time. By doing this, the teacher's want to see our capacity to work under a schedule and reproduce what is drawn out on a plan, from A-Z.

More about the tonewoods:

-Neck: Mahogany
-Back/Sides: Koa, lightly flamed
-Soundboard: Heavy Bearclaw Sitka Spruce
-Binding: Ebony
-Bridge/Fretboard: Ebony
-Bracing: Romanillos style, pre-81 model
-650 mm scale length

Sitka Spruce Soundboard:


Koa Back:


Should have braced the top by next week, more pics up soon...
#2
That is awesome.
I've been looking into lutherie, but I wouldn't know where to get into a course.
Where are you taking this course? Is it a university course, or something your doing in your spare time? Do you get a degree?
How about a high five?

My Gear
Ibanez RG320
Schecter Demon 7
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Line 6 Spider III 30
Bugera 6262/Peavey 412 cabinet
#3
Looks like its gonna be a great build. Good luck!
I started studying classical guitar a few months ago, I love it.
New Setup:
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#4
Quote by VileGangrene
That is awesome.
I've been looking into lutherie, but I wouldn't know where to get into a course.
Where are you taking this course? Is it a university course, or something your doing in your spare time? Do you get a degree?


Hehe, same question popped-up in the other thread.. The school I'm attending is near Montreal, Canada. At the end of the 3-year program we get a diploma stating that we are graduates of the Guitar Lutherie program. On the 3-year period we have all of the basic college classes we have to attend to, aswell as the program specific courses. At this point we are about 10 graduating students together for at least 4days/week at the shop, and 1 day/week is for the basic classes we need to attend to. The workshop is called "Bruand", owned by André Brunet.
#6
Idealy yes you must speak french, but a teacher once mentioned you can pass though another school for basic classes (an english school) and attend the workshop in french. A few teachers speak english very well though, so I wouldn't see a problem in attending the class and getting extra help if needed. I'll ask about it today actually, it was something I was curious about also.
#9
I hope you'll continue building after you've finished the school, I really enjoy your builds.

This build is also looking great so far, can't wait to see the bearclaw figuring and the koa under finish.
Actually, what finish is going on this one?
#11
I have to ask if you have the binding in already. Mostly because me recent attempt at ebony binding didn't turn out as well as it could have. If you have any helpful tips so that next time it goes more smoothly it would be appreciated.
#12
Quote by guitarcam123
I hope you'll continue building after you've finished the school, I really enjoy your builds.

This build is also looking great so far, can't wait to see the bearclaw figuring and the koa under finish.
Actually, what finish is going on this one?


Thank you very much, it means alot!

We'll be spraying this on, as well as the acoustic at the same time. I know he teachers have spoken about a water-based finish but aren't sure yet. If I have enough time, I would love to apply shellac by hand for the top and spray the sides/back.

I'll most definately keep building after school. I should have a build by late summer. Nothing is 100% yet, but 2 classmates and I will be opening up a shop for acoustics and classicals along with electrics on order

Quote by soundjam
I have to ask if you have the binding in already. Mostly because me recent attempt at ebony binding didn't turn out as well as it could have. If you have any helpful tips so that next time it goes more smoothly it would be appreciated.



I haven't turned the bindings yet, that should be done in about 2 weeks. For now only thing I can suggest is to thickness them lower than usual, the blanks were already 0.020" thinner than the standard. To the eye, it isnt much, but it gives them a whole lot more flex to them.

Also wet ofter to prevent crabonization, a little trick I have is to place a damp clothe over the iron so a bit of steam always penetrates the binding.

Another good trick is to turn the bindings all at the same time: tape them up at each end, one next to eachother. This makes the pressure spread evenly on all 4 bindings rather than 1, you also have a better feel for the "bend".

Lastly turn slowly, only as much as the wood lets you bend. This one is very obvious, but I've seen many classmates break and crack bindings/sides by goin too fast, even by the 3rd year.
Last edited by velly69 at Feb 13, 2010,
#13
Thanks for the advice there. Mine were definitely too thick. And I used a heat blanket and mold to bend them, though in the future I might try using a bending iron instead.
#14
Wow...this is looking brilliant already. I agree with Cam, I hope you keep building, your work is amazing to watch.
#15
Really good stuff!


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#17
Alright, more pics uploaded...

Headstock:



Neck glued to soundboard:



Koa sides bent:



Next week I should be gluing the sides and kerfed lining to the soundboard, as well as radiusing the sides and gluing the kerfred lining to the sides. Hopefully by the end of the following week, i'll have time to glue the back to the sides.
#18
I like your headstock, I'm thinking about switching to a slotted headstock for future builds but it looks a bit more complicated then the standard solid variant.
#20
Quote by soundjam
I like your headstock, I'm thinking about switching to a slotted headstock for future builds but it looks a bit more complicated then the standard solid variant.


Thank you, I really wanted to keep it simple with this one. It simple, yet the top corners catch the eye, since they aren't in line with the rest of the side.

It's more time consuming to do, but isn't much harder. With some proper planing and the proper jigs it's easily made. If anything you can always carve out the channels by hand.
#26
no joke?? if you do make some to sell im sooooo down to buy one
i havent even seen the way this ends but i know its gotta be amazing
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#27
This seriously looks nice. No messing about with this build eh? Just a nicely made classical guitar.
EH


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#29
That looks amazing, man! Congratulations! Can't wait to see it finished!
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#30
Very nice looking, wish I could do that
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#31
Binding: Check!



Binding is made of Ebony (0.085"), Purfling (0.080") is made of Indian Rosewood/Maple/Indian Rosewood

I believe last page someone asked about how well ebony turns. To my surprise it turned very well. Something that helped very much was wetting it occasionally, so it didn't carbonize and crack. Also, placing a strip of sand-paper behind it for support helped alot. What it does is keep the grain in full contact with the sandpaper, and prevent kinks and cracks, basically spreading the tension equally along the binding.

Next step on it will be to glue on the fretboard, shape the neck and shape the bridge. After those, comes the final sanding and minor touch-ups. Should be spraying by the end of next week (15th,16th). Stay tuned, the fun part begins very soon!
Last edited by velly69 at Apr 4, 2010,
#33
Thanks! Yes, most bindings and pruflings are handmade. I happened to order this set of bindings off Luthiers Mercantile, simply to save time, but the finale dimensions were done by myself.

As for the pruflings I glued three long strips of veneers together. I generally keep the bindings and pruflings within the same color range as the guitar, I don't want them to pop out too much. These are only details, I want them to (apart from the structural aspect) to add something that slightly catches the eye, but not attracted it directly.
#35
As with the other acoustic I'm building, I'll be sanding this one and applying a sealer coat this week. Since last update, I've glued on the fingerboard, which is Madagascar Rosewood. Should be spraying by next week. The shaping of the neck will be done tomorrow.

If I have time, the first classical will be sealed also.

#39
absolutely sexy
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