#1
I've been trying to learn the song Try by John Mayer, and I noticed it wasn't sounding right until I picked up on this. It's a strumming technique... no matter what the rhythm of the melody is, you keep your strumming hand moving at a steady pace, be it eighth notes, sixteenth, whatever. I noticed a lot of the funk guys do this too. Even when they are on a rest, they still do an upstroke or downstroke (but intentionally miss the strings) to keep the groove going. What is this technique called?
#2
I'm not 100% certain of this but I doubt it has a name. It's just a method of keeping rhythm.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#4
It's essentially playing the notes as straight eigth or sixteenth notes. It's a similar concept to tremolo picking, albeit at a generally slower speed. It adds a sort of blurring or energetic feeling to the melody.
#5
That technique is called correct technique IMO.

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#7
Yeah, it just helps you keep rhythm. I know some drummers who deliberately miss a cymbal or something if they have to count a complex rhythm.
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#8
Keeps the downstrokes on the down beats and the upstrokes on the up beats. Downstrokes sound different than upstrokes, especially when strumming chords. I've never heard of a name for it. It's like asking: what's the name of the technique for tapping your foot and/or counting beats in your head?
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Feb 12, 2010,
#9
Interesting. Question: If this technique is so commonly taught, then why do so few guitar players actually use it? Maybe "few" is the wrong word, but when you look at the greater scheme of guitar players, people who do this are in the minority. Most people stop strumming completely when they hit a rest.
#10
Quote by danleary
Interesting. Question: If this technique is so commonly taught, then why do so few guitar players actually use it? Maybe "few" is the wrong word, but when you look at the greater scheme of guitar players, people who do this are in the minority. Most people stop strumming completely when they hit a rest.

Heavy metal guys probably think it looks funny.
#11
Quote by danleary
Interesting. Question: If this technique is so commonly taught, then why do so few guitar players actually use it? Maybe "few" is the wrong word, but when you look at the greater scheme of guitar players, people who do this are in the minority. Most people stop strumming completely when they hit a rest.


Well, the minority of guitarists are actually good guitarists

But to be honest, it seems like it's the minority of people who don't do this. Take galloping for example. Down, up, down... down, up, down... down, up, down... same concept there. We naturally do what we have to do to keep the downstrokes on the down beats and at the start of measures.
#12
Quote by fixationdarknes
Keeps the downstrokes on the down beats and the upstrokes on the up beats. Downstrokes sound different than upstrokes, especially when strumming chords. I've never heard of a name for it. It's like asking: what's the name of the technique for tapping your foot and/or counting beats in your head?


Downstrokes sound different than upstrokes? Brilliant, who'd have thought! Thanks for this revelation!

I think you're over simplifying this a bit. I'm not talking about simply doing upstrokes and downstrokes. I'm talking about doing a stroke, but not actually playing a note. Doing a stroke on a rest, missing the strings completely.
#13
If you are playing on all up beats for example, and you keep your hand moving during the down strokes and miss the strings deliberately, you will play the up-beat notes with up strokes. However, if you simply do not move during rest, you will likely either play with all down strokes or alternate between down strokes and up strokes. Hence why I said that downstrokes and upstrokes sound different.
#14
Alright, thanks, I think I get what you mean. I still don't understand why you say a minority of guys don't do this though, or maybe I'm just not noticing them do it. It seems usually people strum to the rhythm but don't really keep it straight. I'm talking about famous guitarists too, not just no names on youtube. I guess I have to keep practicing this.
#15
Well, you're certainly not wrong. It definitely depends on the context of the musical situation. Some do, some don't. Some choose to do so at times and choose to not do so at other times. It's just that from what I've experienced, I generally find that people usually keep the downstrokes on the down beats/measure starts, and this usually involves some of this technique you are speaking of.

Sometimes if a tempo is very quick and it would make me uncomfortable to keep my hand moving when not necessary, I will minimize on the movement and keep still during rest. And like I mentioned before, galloping is the same kind of thing. At more relaxed speeds though, I find it nice to keep the flow goin'.
#16
yeah it's the correct way to strum, instead of stopping your hand between strums, which can be awkward, you just keep your hand moving and don't hit the strings when you're not supposed to play
#17
Yeah, I do this somewhat. It's what my teacher taught me from the beginning.
#18
I object to people claiming that this is the "correct" way. Whilst certainly not wrong, it's not correct either. It's simply a method of keeping rhythm, to say it's the correct way is like saying: "dude, you're nodding your head to the rhythm, that's all wrong, you should tap your foot!"
The way you keep rhythm is entirely personal imo.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#19
its handy for keeping track of rhythm but it isnt necessary if you are good enough at keeping time which is why a lot of experience guitarists dont do it because its a waste of energy
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#20
I just do this naturally, but i guess it depends on the the person. I don't think there's a name for it though.
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#21
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Heavy metal guys probably think it looks funny.


Yeah, I'd agree. Most guitar players play metal, and you don't see chording much in metal.
#23
some people call it ghost picking
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#24
yeah i think i've noticed a lot of local acoustic singer / songwriters doing that...like their arm kinda like... strums air to i dunno...keep track of time? makes sense to me
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