#1
im thinking about getting the ibanez RG1570 prestige but i have never owned a guitar with a floyd rose tremolo. just how much of a pain in the ass are they? what is it that you really have to do with them to have them set up just right, and how do you go about changing the strings and all that sort of stuff? just give me any information on them that would be helpful, because i really want to know what im dealing with before i buy it.
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#2
Getting it set up for the first time is kind of a pain in the ass, but once you do, you'll almost never have to touch it again. Unless you decide to change string gauges. Look it up on youtube, there's instructional videos all over.
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#3
My most used thread on this site much cheers to madpickin03

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226

To answer your question they are a complete pain in the ass till you know what you're doing then they can be your friend.
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#4
Whenever you palm mute, you bend the bridge a little which temporarily detunes the strings. If you find that annoying have to place extra tension springs in to disable the tremolo system. I don't know a whole lot about tremolo systems but I'm presuming all Floyd Rose tremolo systems are floating. In that case when you place all the tension springs in the bridge will sort of collapse and you have to adjust some screws to stabilize it. I'm also presuming all Floyd Roses have locking nuts and fine tuners. In which case tuning is going to be vary annoying whether you use the locking nuts and fine tuners or not.

The only good thing I've found from the tremolo system, if you're not into tremolos in the first place, is that you'll rarely have to buy strings. This is because you have to cut the ball end of a string off and place it into the slot/hole. And because strings mostly or always break at the bridge you can just sort of scoot the string up.

To replace the strings you simply use the Allen key the guitar comes with, unscrew the cylinder that holds your string, replace the string (making sure the ball end is cut off), and re-tighten the cylinder all while holding tremolo bar down, because you need to fit the key into the cylinder.

If you don't need the tremolo system, DON'T GET IT. I completely regret getting it. If you love tremolo systems though, definitely get it if you don't mind the work.
#5
Quote by o0Vox
Whenever you palm mute, you bend the bridge a little which temporarily detunes the strings. If you find that annoying have to place extra tension springs in to disable the tremolo system. I don't know a whole lot about tremolo systems but I'm presuming all Floyd Rose tremolo systems are floating. In that case when you place all the tension springs in the bridge will sort of collapse and you have to adjust some screws to stabilize it. I'm also presuming all Floyd Roses have locking nuts and fine tuners. In which case tuning is going to be vary annoying whether you use the locking nuts and fine tuners or not.

The only good thing I've found from the tremolo system, if you're not into tremolos in the first place, is that you'll rarely have to buy strings. This is because you have to cut the ball end of a string off and place it into the slot/hole. And because strings mostly or always break at the bridge you can just sort of scoot the string up.

To replace the strings you simply use the Allen key the guitar comes with, unscrew the cylinder that holds your string, replace the string (making sure the ball end is cut off), and re-tighten the cylinder all while holding tremolo bar down, because you need to fit the key into the cylinder.

If you don't need the tremolo system, DON'T GET IT. I completely regret getting it. If you love tremolo systems though, definitely get it if you don't mind the work.


i believe the tremolo that this guitar comes with is a little different than most. it says something on the description about not having to cut the balls off the strings and things like that and it has other things that are a little different about it as well i believe, but thanks for the advice.
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#7
Quote by Chaz-6(sic)6
It's a floyd rose? I thought most ibanez guitars had edge trems.


it's an edge pro, but i thought it would be considered a floyd rose? haha, just goes to show how much i know about floyd rose i guess.
Quote by ultimatedaver
You know, I'm actually gonna sig that. Because it is so unbelievably true.
#8
At first they can be a real pain to set-up. When I got my Jackson I had an employee at my local guitar store help me set-up and I just payed attention while he walked me through and the Floyd has been my friend ever since. For the people that say that they hate the floating bridges, fair enough, but I think it's good to have at least gone guitar with some sort of vibrato system even if you're not into all the crazy dive bombs and Dime squeals just for that subtle vibrato effect that's so beautiful.

One of the greatest benefits of the Floyd is also how it's neigh impossible to knock out of tune, so once you're tuned up maybe use the fine tuners every once in awhile to make sure it's tuned perfectly but besides that you're honestly good to go for at least a few months. So all in all yes, the Floyds or Edge Pros or Kahlers are a pain in the ass at first but after changing strings once or twice it's absurdly easy and won't trouble you. I would recommend having an employee help you set it up at first and have them just walk you through it just to get the gist.

Anyways, I hope you get one! Since I've gotten my Jackson every subsequent guitar I've gotten I've made sure had a floyd because they are honestly fun and extremely reliable systems.
#9
A floyd rose is hard at first, but after trial and error, you get better at it.

And if you don't like the floyd rose, you can easily block it and turn it into a hardtail.
#10
I have the seven string version of the guitar your looking at. I would highly recomend it.

Now onto floyds. At first they take a while to get use to. Restrings will take some time out of your day. But after a few days you will get the fine tuning down, and you will learn about the hand pressure for palm mutes. After about 3-5 restrings you will have it down pat. I went to 1h:32m to an average of 25-30m a restrings, with my fastest time being 15m26s, includeing streatching the strings.

Basicly you just gota spend time doing it. Your playing guitar you may as well learn to work/maintain them nomater what the model.
#12
like other people said on here, they just take some getting used to. after you get your initial set up over with you dont really have to work at it anymore. theyre not the best for people who like to change their tunings around a lot though. unless ou like serious divebombs, it should stay in tune for a good long while