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#1
Post your vocal range!

Lowest: Low F (1st fret on low E string)
Highest: pretty much high A (5th fret on high E string).....I have hit A# before though
Falsetto: I'm like a ****in girl opera singer when it comes to falsetto lol I can hit normal notes but can also be an idiot and hit like the 22th fret on the high E string
#2
i've got the biggest range of anybody i've ever met so far...
i can go from almost inaudible (no tuner picks it up, its deeper than a 6 string bass by at least one octave if not more) and my highs/falsetto are somewhere in the vacinity of Adam Levine from Maroon 5
#3
Haha, barely any. A lot of songs go too high and too low for me. But I'm sure I have awful singing technique.
#6
F#2 to C5, and i can hit notes within a major third on either side, but uncomfortably so.

i never checked my range with falsetto.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#7
i can hit from the low D in drop D to the Bb on the high E string.
(thhe Bb only on good days, but i can hit the A consistently).
like alot of people in this thread, im not sure about my falsetto.
but thats cause my falsetto sounds like a cat being skinned alive.......compared to my normal singing voice which gets alot of compliments.

haha i dont know why my falsetto sucks such balls.
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#8
Pretty standard tenor range, about A2-C5 without falsetto
I've kinda got a low G the first few hours of the morning and I can keep pushing the high end up to about Eb5, maybe even E5 but anything above the high C sounds really strained

Falsetto I really don't know, I never really developed mine cause I've always found it hard to flip without sounding like shit, but I know I can at least scream out an A5.
That's not really musically useful with the way I sound up there though lol
#9
If you just want to include all of the sounds I can reasonably squeak out, regardless of tonality (so, including vocal fry and whistle voice) then I'd say B1-G6. If you talking about a tonally consistent, usable range that could still pass as full voice, I'd say D2-C6 (drop D on a guitar to whatever the soprano high C is.)

I'm not sure people are really aware of how low a bass guitar is. Some of the world's most accomplished basses couldn't possibly hit the low E on a bass guitar. I'm getting the impression that perhaps people are hitting the equivalent of low Es and Ds on a standard guitar with an especially dark tone and thinking "man, that's really low, like a bass." It would help to do a descending scale, starting from the low E on a guitar. If anyone here can actually do that with any reasonable semblance of decent tone, you've got some phone calls to make, and some concert halls to sell out.
Last edited by Chaingarden at Mar 31, 2010,
#10
From what I can gather, I can hit an A below the low E string on a guitar, up to the 12th fret on the low E string.

I don't really have a very large range. I used to be able to sing louder, but I let myself slack off a few years ago. I'm currently in the process of doing a few excersies to get my range back to something more respectable.

As well, for as long as I can sing, it almost pointless for me as I never sing that low in a song.
"Here I sit, beneath a lonely line."

~iband48's signature
#11
I've got quite a nice range i have to say. I can sing about a really low A to pretty high D. According to my old vocal teacher I appearantly can sing lower than most russain opera singers. who knew. as for my high singing it's pretty good. I can hit the notes with plenty of power and sustain but when I try to go too high it sounds like sh*t. im still trying to expand my range so i can hit those higher notes tho. As for my falsetto. at it's highest......sounds like a combination of Rob Halford and a school girl tied to a railroad track with an approaching train
#12
Quote by lavalamp360
I've got quite a nice range i have to say. I can sing about a really low A to pretty high D. According to my old vocal teacher I appearantly can sing lower than most russain opera singers. who knew. as for my high singing it's pretty good. I can hit the notes with plenty of power and sustain but when I try to go too high it sounds like sh*t. im still trying to expand my range so i can hit those higher notes tho. As for my falsetto. at it's highest......sounds like a combination of Rob Halford and a school girl tied to a railroad track with an approaching train
I'd like to hear that low A. Care to record it?

Anyways, here's mine:

Comfortably, E2 to E4.
On a good day, or really pushing, D2 to F#4, although I've had a few days where I could hit a G4. And of course some of those sick days when I could hit like a C2 or a B1. But those don't count.

So, if you're counting only notes that I can hit comfortably any day, E2 to E4. If you're counting notes I can usually hit, it's D2 to F#4.

Edit: Actually I can hit a B1 at the moment. I guess I'm a little sick.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Mar 31, 2010,
#13
Are you all counting vocal fry at the bottom of your range? cause most of you seem to sing lower than anyone I've ever known and I doubt you're all deep basses.

BTW I've finally figured out how to use the high head voice stuff without sounding breathy and straining my voice, I kinda first got it by doing a staccato "ow" sound and now I have a nice loud high A without any pain in my throat. Gonna see if I can get up to that soprano C when the practise rooms here open again =D
#14
Quote by User_Name336
i've got the biggest range of anybody i've ever met so far...
i can go from almost inaudible (no tuner picks it up, its deeper than a 6 string bass by at least one octave if not more) and my highs/falsetto are somewhere in the vacinity of Adam Levine from Maroon 5

that is something we all have to hear. Am I right?

As for me, I have something like F#2 - A#4 (when I'm wormed up of course. I can go lower, but it sounds stupid).
Falsetto up to B5. But what's the point in it anyway?
*maybe i'll do a record of my range. Would like to hear it for myself)*
#15
from G2 to G4 solidly
sometimes I can pull off a low F or F# and on a good day and with a bit of a rasp I can get to A5
#18
Quote by Cheeseman07
Are you all counting vocal fry at the bottom of your range? cause most of you seem to sing lower than anyone I've ever known and I doubt you're all deep basses.
+1.

There are 4 vocal registers: (from low to high) vocal fry, modal, falsetto, whistle. Your "vocal range" only counts the modal register. NOTHING else.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#19
My real vocal range is like a C2 on a piano to a E4 (E above middle C) falsetto gets me to about an A above the soprano staff.
#21
Well, I'm not going to ramble out random notes like some of the people quite obviously have.

But eh.. well, I guess I'll just say like, the notes in songs my band covers, that I do comfortably.

I can hit the low "numb" note in Brick by Ben Folds Five, a semi-tone lower than the original (since it's in D, and we play tuned a semi-tone down), I don't think there's many songs where I've had to go lower than that.
It comes out clearly and easy to understand.. not sure what note that actually is though.

As for highest, well, I'm not sure, but I can hit every note in "Hands Down" by Dashboard Confessional a semi-tone higher than the original (we've been playing in standard recently, original song is tuned down a semi-tone).. they aren't falsetto notes, they are all head-voice stuff, they come out clear and easy for me to sing, I can actually go higher than that, in head voice, but I'm failing to remember any songs where I've had to do it.

Random squeal noises don't count, and for falsetto, well I can easily hit the high falsetto note in "Unchained Melody" by The Righteous Brothers, in the original key, and it's incredibly easy, I could go a fair bit higher than that (we don't have any other songs we cover that go higher than that in falsetto though)..

So yeah, no idea how I'm supposed to figure out exactly what the notes are that I can reach but yeah.
#22
just checked with my guitar.

bearing in mind that i've been awake all night and its now 7:30am i think my actual range is quite a bit more after proper warmups etc.

Lowest: low e string dropped to a c
Highest: 7th fret on high e string
sleep when your dead- now is time for rock
#23
this thread has got me really interested.

does anyone know of male singers who hit B4-C5 range and higher consistently?
the only one i can think of now is james labrie from dream theater and the dude from symphony X.
(symphony X singer is probably the best male singer ive heard in my life)
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#24
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
this thread has got me really interested.

does anyone know of male singers who hit B4-C5 range and higher consistently?
the only one i can think of now is james labrie from dream theater and the dude from symphony X.
(symphony X singer is probably the best male singer ive heard in my life)


Chris Cornell, Myles Kennedy, Robert Plant, Ian Gillian, Jeff Buckley, David Lee Roth, David Coverdale.
#25
As of this very moment, my range is E2? (open low E string) to A6?(17th fret high e string). On a good day I can hit an open D in drop D (and that's about my absolute lowest, which may be vocal fry in all fairness) and the 18th fret high e. And no, I'm not including falsetto or whistle register in my range. For some reason I haven't been able to use any falsetto lately, although my head voice can go really high.
#26
Quote by canvasDude
As of this very moment, my range is E2? (open low E string) to A6?(17th fret high e string). On a good day I can hit an open D in drop D (and that's about my absolute lowest, which may be vocal fry in all fairness) and the 18th fret high e. And no, I'm not including falsetto or whistle register in my range. For some reason I haven't been able to use any falsetto lately, although my head voice can go really high.

You're mistaken
I bet your range is something like E2-A4. everything else is falsetto (which you mix up with head voice)

4 octaves? this is omg

PS. your avatar made me lol... its super cool

UPD: if you think i'm wrong, the recording of your range would be cool to hear
Last edited by vict at Apr 10, 2010,
#27
This is ridiculous. 98% can "sing" lower than any Bass 2 and higher than any Tenor 1 in my semi-professional (100 person) choir. You are all full of shit. I saw maybe a few people who actually posted realistic answers.

I am in my second year minoring in voice in University and I was told by my voice teacher, who's been teaching for 25 years, that I have a good range. It is Eb2 to about F4 consistently (give or take either way on good days) not counting falsetto.

So stop lying about how great you are or how many notes you can squeak out. No one actually cares about that; the only notes that matter are the ones that actually sound good.
And I can play guitar like a mother****in riot.
#28
Quote by radioheadfreak
This is ridiculous. 98% can "sing" lower than any Bass 2 and higher than any Tenor 1 in my semi-professional (100 person) choir. You are all full of shit. I saw maybe a few people who actually posted realistic answers.

I am in my second year minoring in voice in University and I was told by my voice teacher, who's been teaching for 25 years, that I have a good range. It is Eb2 to about F4 consistently (give or take either way on good days) not counting falsetto.

So stop lying about how great you are or how many notes you can squeak out. No one actually cares about that; the only notes that matter are the ones that actually sound good.


*sigh* Most of us are rock singers. Most of us include a supported head voice in our range. Classical styles differ in how range is defined, and what is acceptable tonality.

If there's one thing I've learned about music majors at universities, especially those that concentrate on voice, it's that they generally reject blending of registers and adducting the voice. What a shame; it's so limiting.

I can't speak for everyone, but I didn't lie about what I said. I have recordings to prove it.
#29
If you talking about a tonally consistent, usable range that could still pass as full voice, I'd say D2-C6


I believe that you may be able to hit this D, but the fact that you claim to be able to hit that C with good tone is absolutely ridiculous. Do you realize that that C is 2 octaves above middle? Great operatic tenors are able (somewhat expected) to hit just one octave above. Now what does that make you? Either incredibly/improbably talented, or full of shit...


BTW where are these recordings of yours that feature your 4 octave range?

Classical styles differ in how range is defined, and what is acceptable tonality.


Read the sticky on how to define range before you start making assumptions.
And I can play guitar like a mother****in riot.
Last edited by radioheadfreak at Apr 14, 2010,
#30
D2 to Fsharp 4 !

Although on good days i can go to that G :S... i want to go to C!!!
#31
How exactly does one go about measuring their vocal range?


I imagine mine would be fairly restricted anyways, but just curious.
#32
Quote by radioheadfreak
I believe that you may be able to hit this D, but the fact that you claim to be able to hit that C with good tone is absolutely ridiculous. Do you realize that that C is 2 octaves above middle? Great operatic tenors are able (somewhat expected) to hit just one octave above. Now what does that make you? Either incredibly/improbably talented, or full of shit...


BTW where are these recordings of yours that feature your 4 octave range?



Read the sticky on how to define range before you start making assumptions.


it's in his sig, but what's gonna happen here is that you're gonna listen to those samples and call what he's doing "falsetto" even though it's connected and blended smoothly with his lower range. then we trade blows and bash each others technique, and the circle of life continues.
#33
Quote by radioheadfreak
I believe that you may be able to hit this D, but the fact that you claim to be able to hit that C with good tone is absolutely ridiculous. Do you realize that that C is 2 octaves above middle? Great operatic tenors are able (somewhat expected) to hit just one octave above. Now what does that make you? Either incredibly/improbably talented, or full of shit...


BTW where are these recordings of yours that feature your 4 octave range?



Read the sticky on how to define range before you start making assumptions.


Firstly, do not patronize me or the others in this thread. You have been nothing but acerbic thus far. In addition, you have provided no recordings to establish any semblance of authority you may have with regards to vocal pedagogy.

In my signature, there is a song entitled "Live Like a Martyr," as well as a "Billie Jean" cover, which both feature F#s above high C. That is 6 semitones below the C we're talking about, but if you're really that interesting in hearing, I can record a soprano C for you.

The sticky about defining range was written by another person who has an opinion. It is in no way an infallible and conclusive consensus amongst the vocal community. While I respect axemanchris's opinion (I'm assuming that's who wrote the sticky, I could be wrong) there is a large portion of the vocal community that does disagree with him on range definition, myself included. You and Chris come from an operatic school of teaching. It is an entirely different approach and tonality than a VAST majority of popular and rock singing.
#34
Quote by ankthebank
i want to go to C!!!


I as well. :/

At the moment, my range is from C2-D4. I would be happy with this, but I have Russell Allen and James LaBrie as vocal idols.
#35
I don't know what note properly gauges "BBLLLLLLAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRGGGHHH"
Some grammar and proper spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.

*This has been a public service announcement*
#36
To find my range, I downloaded the sing&see demo. I think you need a mic, though.
#37
Quote by Chaingarden
Firstly, do not patronize me or the others in this thread. You have been nothing but acerbic thus far. In addition, you have provided no recordings to establish any semblance of authority you may have with regards to vocal pedagogy.

In my signature, there is a song entitled "Live Like a Martyr," as well as a "Billie Jean" cover, which both feature F#s above high C. That is 6 semitones below the C we're talking about, but if you're really that interesting in hearing, I can record a soprano C for you.

The sticky about defining range was written by another person who has an opinion. It is in no way an infallible and conclusive consensus amongst the vocal community. While I respect axemanchris's opinion (I'm assuming that's who wrote the sticky, I could be wrong) there is a large portion of the vocal community that does disagree with him on range definition, myself included. You and Chris come from an operatic school of teaching. It is an entirely different approach and tonality than a VAST majority of popular and rock singing.


First of all, as a musician, I am tired of coming to places like this to see people just bragging about themselves. That is why I my tone is as negative as it is. You're right, I am probably better off not voicing my opinion.

But now that we're here I might as well.

So, I don't really feel the need to "provide recordings to establish any semblance of authority I may have with regards to vocal pedagogy," because I have really not made any outrageous claims. My range is small (compared to the claims on here), and I said I was a voice minor, not even a major. I am actually a guitar major, but that is beside the point.

So, I listened to your recordings. I'm not going to start insulting you or analyzing your voice, because I would analyze from a classical standpoint and we'll always butt heads there, so agree to disagree on tone and such. Intonation, well you can't make excuses for. Either you're in tune or not; style plays no part here. For the most part you were pretty good, but your high notes just got completely lost in a lot of spots. You might call that style, I call it lack of vocal control. I've heard amazing rock singers who will do what you call style, but their intonation is really good throughout.

As for range... well, you did "hit" that F#, but in my humble opinion, it really just sounded terrible. But hey, I'm just a classically trained vocalist, I don't know what "good" rock music sounds like.
And I can play guitar like a mother****in riot.
#39
Quote by radioheadfreak
First of all, as a musician, I am tired of coming to places like this to see people just bragging about themselves. That is why I my tone is as negative as it is. You're right, I am probably better off not voicing my opinion.

But now that we're here I might as well.

So, I don't really feel the need to "provide recordings to establish any semblance of authority I may have with regards to vocal pedagogy," because I have really not made any outrageous claims. My range is small (compared to the claims on here), and I said I was a voice minor, not even a major. I am actually a guitar major, but that is beside the point.

So, I listened to your recordings. I'm not going to start insulting you or analyzing your voice, because I would analyze from a classical standpoint and we'll always butt heads there, so agree to disagree on tone and such. Intonation, well you can't make excuses for. Either you're in tune or not; style plays no part here. For the most part you were pretty good, but your high notes just got completely lost in a lot of spots. You might call that style, I call it lack of vocal control. I've heard amazing rock singers who will do what you call style, but their intonation is really good throughout.

As for range... well, you did "hit" that F#, but in my humble opinion, it really just sounded terrible. But hey, I'm just a classically trained vocalist, I don't know what "good" rock music sounds like.


You know what, that's totally fair. I would disagree in that I think the intonation, at least in Live like A Martyr was fairly spot on (unless you can distinguish the exact Hz of each note. If you're a perfect pitch type, I guess I couldn't argue with you.) There are many off-notes in Billie Jean, and it's a fairly nasty sounding F#, but the whole song is only half serious. I think the Live Like A Martyr F# is fairly tonally rich for being an F#. But those are mostly differences in opinion.

I can't tell you you're wrong, just that I disagree with you. By classical standards, using only chest voice, I can probably only get to about a G or A below high C.

I do think though, that if you do want to talk about tone and intonation, you better provide some recordings to show that you indeed are familiar with how to produce good tone, and how to sing exceptionally in tune. Otherwise, it just comes off as idle critique.
#40
Quote by vict
You're mistaken
I bet your range is something like E2-A4. everything else is falsetto (which you mix up with head voice)

4 octaves? this is omg

PS. your avatar made me lol... its super cool

UPD: if you think i'm wrong, the recording of your range would be cool to hear



Actually, (after ditching the guitar for a piano as reference) my lowest usable note is G2. My highest possible note (using only head voice) is still the A6, but that note is rather forced (though not all together bad sounding). That would make my range just over 4 octaves (including chest and head voice only). I don't see the problem with this, considering a three octave range is fairly standard from what I've observed in my secondary school choir.

P.S. Thanks about the avatar, lol.

EDIT: I don't have a means of recording myself atm, so I can't supply any evidence of my claims. However, all my friends at school (who are in select choir) make fun of my for how high my voice can go relative to my speaking voice; if that counts for anything.

EDIT2: I meant F2, not G2. Sorry.
Last edited by canvasDude at Apr 15, 2010,
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