#1
Hello!

I was wondering what string gauge would be ideal for a shortscale Fender Mustang. I currently have them equipped with .09. However, I notice especially when I hit the low-e string pretty hard or have it fretted beyond the 12th string, that the strings start hitting the frets, creating buzz.

So I thought of perhaps going up a gauge or two/three. Which would you recommend? I was thinking 0.11's myself. Would that alleviate the problem?

Thanks!

Michael
#3
I think you'll need to raise the action a bit. That, and I think increasing the gauge to .11s would be a great idea. I've got a 24" Jaguar and .11s suit it perfectly!
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#4
11s will be much too thick. try 9.5s or 10s. also, when using a normal/appropriate action, you will still get string buzz if the strings are too loose.
Last edited by TheFunkyAvocado at Apr 5, 2010,
#5
Quote by TheFunkyAvocado
11s will be much too thick. try 9.5s or 10s. also, when using a normal/appropriate action, you will still get string buzz if the strings are too loose.

orly?

i have 11s on a few of my 25.5" scale guitars - in standard tuning. And that's not too thick at all - since 24" tends to make the strings feel really limp anyway, 11s should give a decent amount of tension comparable to that of 10s on a 25.5" scale neck.

I think that the buzzing in the upper frets may also be something to do with the neck relief, too, which will probably be corrected by stepping up to 11s, if there even is an issue with it in the first place.
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#6
Quote by Blompcube
orly?

i have 11s on a few of my 25.5" scale guitars - in standard tuning. And that's not too thick at all - since 24" tends to make the strings feel really limp anyway, 11s should give a decent amount of tension comparable to that of 10s on a 25.5" scale neck.


sure you CAN have 11s on the guitar. personally i use 12-56s on my 25.5 inch guitar (it is tuned down but the strings are still tight as f***). chances are though, that the ts wont like it. unless you really have a commitment to using thick strings, it will likely just be a pain.
#7
I use .11 on an 24" neck, gives me a better and more powerful tone than with .10, also good for getting stronger fingers
#8
Thanks everybody. And no worries Funky Avocado, I usually play acoustic (13s on 25.5"), so I'm sort of used to heavy strings. While I love .09s on a 25.5", it just feels really wimpy on a shortscale. So I'm still pondering between 10s or 11s. Keep 'em coming, especially Jaguar/Mustang owners!

If it matters I'd like to mostly play RHCP/Hendrix-esque (funk)rock and classic rock.
#9
Quote by TheFunkyAvocado
sure you CAN have 11s on the guitar. personally i use 12-56s on my 25.5 inch guitar (it is tuned down but the strings are still tight as f***). chances are though, that the ts wont like it. unless you really have a commitment to using thick strings, it will likely just be a pain.

You're still missing the point which is the strings are looser on a 24" scale, and the mustang is a 24" scale.
Rig Winter 2017:

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Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#10
I have 10s on my strat/tele which are a bit too slack for my liking, and 11s on my Jaguar. I would say there's a little less tension using 11s on the 24" than on my other two guitars. I'm likely to be moving to 12s on the jag and 11s on the others (perhaps 12s on my strat which will be tuned down half a step).

On all setup guides I've read for the Jag they've always said not to use anything less than 11s. Because of the scale length that doesn't make for pretty arduous work anyway.
#11
Brian May's guitar is a 24" scale and he uses .008s. Guess he's a light picker.
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#12
For that guitar 0.9 should be fine.
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#13
Get 11s.

Short scale fenders crave them. I have a jag too and use 10-52 gauge strings on it. Feels good.

But generally heavier gauge strings on the jags are only reccomended because the angle from the trem to the bridge of the strings is really low and has pretty low tension meaning it buzzes alot.. Not that much of an issue with the mustang since the bridge and trem are like a few CMs from each other.

But floppy string tension can still create buzz, its deffinately worth looking into your guitars set up.
#14
Quote by beckyjc
Get 11s.

Short scale fenders crave them. I have a jag too and use 10-52 gauge strings on it. Feels good.

But generally heavier gauge strings on the jags are only reccomended because the angle from the trem to the bridge of the strings is really low and has pretty low tension meaning it buzzes alot.. Not that much of an issue with the mustang since the bridge and trem are like a few CMs from each other.

But floppy string tension can still create buzz, its deffinately worth looking into your guitars set up.


I'm slightly confused. You say 'get 11s', next you say that 10s 'feel good'. Thanks for your advise though! Just want to know why 11s instead of 10s? Will that extra decrease in tension help even more?
#15
I'd go with .10s. It's what has been on ever Jag I've come across before and it seems to be the best fit for standard tuning, to my fingers at least. That said they are justa little bit on the soft side, if I was tuning down say half a step I'd definitely then move up to .11s.

That said, change string gauge if you don't like the tension of the strings, but if it is just the buzz you have a problem with then string gauge isn't going to fix that - if anything it'll make it worse. To fix the buzz you need to check the neck relief is set properly and then you'll need to check the frets are all level and in good condition - assuming these two things are both fine, you'll need to raise your bridge slightly and possibly consider getting a new, slightly taller nut. You'd need to raise the action if you got thicker strings anyway, so you might as well raise it first to check if it solves your problem, then get thicker strings after if you still want 'em (bearing in mind that raising your action will also slightly increase string tension anyway).
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