dark_gilbert
UG's bastard son
Join date: Jul 2007
78 IQ
#2
Sorry to bust your bubble, but i'm pretty sure you've created a piece in 4/4. If you have a bar in 9/8 followed by a bar in 7/8 with straight quavers it groups into bars of 16. I'm pretty sure you haven't created any polyrhythms at all.
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DiminishedFifth
Absolute Imperfection
Join date: Nov 2008
3,247 IQ
#3
Quote by dark_gilbert
Sorry to bust your bubble, but i'm pretty sure you've created a piece in 4/4. If you have a bar in 9/8 followed by a bar in 7/8 with straight quavers it groups into bars of 16. I'm pretty sure you haven't created any polyrhythms at all.

This.

There is no polyrhythm, and there are no polymeters (which is what you were ACTUALLY asking for). It's just a straight 4/4 riff. Even the drums are in 4/4 with the snare on the 2 and 4.
juckfush
UG's Fancy Antsy-Lope!
Join date: Sep 2007
1,878 IQ
#5
Quote by DiminishedFifth
This.

There is no polyrhythm, and there are no polymeters (which is what you were ACTUALLY asking for). It's just a straight 4/4 riff. Even the drums are in 4/4 with the snare on the 2 and 4.

To be fair, the crash is implying some sort of 3 feel, but even then I feel like it's subtracting from the piece; it's overly-cluttered without really benefiting the piece or the melodic motifs.

The riff itself is good, and could be a solid bridging section, or a lead-in to something more dynamic. I'd say though, to answer your question, the entire piece is in straight 4/4, with the crash implying 3 feel. This would be considered a polymeter rather than a polyrhythm, which would typically imply that you're using two or more different subdivisions or groupings at once (such as a group of 16th note quintuplets over a group of 8th triplets implying a 5:3 polyrhythm).